Urinalysis And Body Fluids 6th Edition By Susan King Strasinger – Test Bank

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Urinalysis And Body Fluids 6th Edition By Susan King Strasinger – Test Bank

 

Chapter 2: Introduction to Urinalysis

 

 

 

Multiple Choice

 

 

 

  1. All of the following are components of normal urine except:
  2. Urea
  3. Chloride
  4. Amino acids
  5. Creatinine

 

ANS: C

DIF: Level 1

OBJ: 1

TOP: Urinalysis composition

 

 

 

  1. To determine if a specimen is urine, measure the concentrations of:
  2. Glucose and protein
  3. Urea and creatinine
  4. Uric acid and amino acids
  5. Protein and amino acids

 

ANS: B

DIF: Level 2

OBJ: 2

TOP: Urinalysis composition

 

 

 

  1. The average daily volume of urine produced by a normal adult is approximately:
  2. 200 mL
  3. 500 mL
  4. 1200 mL
  5. 2500 mL

 

ANS: C

DIF: Level 1

OBJ: 3

TOP: Urine volume

 

 

 

  1. A person exhibiting oliguria would have a urine volume of:
  2. 200 to 500 mL
  3. 600 to 1000 mL
  4. 1000 to 1500 mL
  5. more than 1500 mL

 

ANS: A

DIF: Level 2

OBJ: 3

TOP: Urine volume

 

 

 

  1. Which of the following terms is correctly matched with urine output?
  2. Anuria: 400 mL in 24 hours
  3. Oliguria: 1000 mL in 24 hours
  4. Polyuria: 3000 mL in 24 hours
  5. Nocturia: no urine output

 

ANS: C

DIF: Level 1

OBJ: 3

TOP: Urine volume

 

 

 

  1. The polyuria associated with diabetes mellitus is caused by:
  2. The presence of excess glucose in the urine
  3. A defect in the production of ADH (antidiuretic hormone)
  4. The diuretic effect of insulin
  5. Failure of the collecting duct to respond to ADH

 

ANS: A

DIF: Level 2

OBJ: 3

TOP: Urine volume

 

 

 

  1. Urine from a patient with diabetes insipidus has:
  2. Decreased volume and decreased specific gravity
  3. Decreased volume and increased specific gravity
  4. Increased volume and increased specific gravity
  5. Increased volume and decreased specific gravity

 

ANS: D

DIF: Level 2

OBJ: 3

TOP: Urine volume

 

 

 

  1. A patient with polyuria shows a high specific gravity in the urine. The patient should be evaluated for:
  2. Renal tubular acidosis
  3. Diabetes mellitus
  4. Diabetes insipidus
  5. Prostatic infection

 

ANS: B

DIF: Level 2

OBJ: 3

TOP: Urine volume

 

 

 

  1. Persons taking diuretics can be expected to produce:
  2. Anuria
  3. Polyuria
  4. Nocturia
  5. Oliguria

 

ANS: B

DIF: Level 2

OBJ: 3

TOP: Urine volume

 

 

 

  1. A urine specimen may be rejected by the laboratory for all of the following reasons except:
  2. Nonmatching label and requisition form
  3. Specimen contaminated with feces
  4. Contamination on the exterior of the container
  5. The container uses a screw-top lid

 

ANS: D

DIF: Level 1

OBJ: 4

TOP: Specimen collection/handling

 

 

 

  1. An unpreserved urine specimen left at room temperature overnight will have decreased:
  2. Bacteria
  3. Specific gravity and pH
  4. Glucose and ketones
  5. Color and specific gravity

 

ANS: C

DIF: Level 2

OBJ: 6

TOP: Specimen collection/handling

 

 

 

  1. Which of the following will be least affected in an unpreserved specimen left at room temperature overnight?
  2. Bilirubin
  3. Urobilinogen
  4. Red blood cells
  5. Protein

 

ANS: D

DIF: Level 2

OBJ: 7

TOP: Specimen collection/handling

 

 

 

  1. Red blood cells will disintegrate more rapidly in urine that is:
  2. Concentrated and acidic
  3. Concentrated and alkaline
  4. Dilute and acidic
  5. Dilute and alkaline

 

ANS: D

DIF: Level 1

OBJ: 7

TOP: Specimen collection/handling

 

 

 

  1. The primary cause of the changes that take place in unpreserved urine is:
  2. Bacterial growth
  3. Excessive exposure to light
  4. Oxidation of chemical constituents
  5. Precipitation of crystals

 

ANS: A

DIF: Level 2

OBJ: 8

TOP: Specimen collection/handling

 

 

 

  1. Which of the following urine chemicals will deteriorate when exposed to light?
  2. pH
  3. Leukocytes esterase
  4. Bilirubin
  5. Specific gravity

 

ANS: C

DIF: Level 2

OBJ: 7

TOP: Specimen collection/handling

 

 

 

  1. Which of the following is least likely to occur if a urine specimen stands at room temperature for more than 2 hours?
  2. Deterioration of formed elements
  3. Increased bacteria
  4. Decreased pH
  5. Decreased glucose

 

ANS: C

DIF: Level 1

OBJ: 7

TOP: Specimen collection/handling

 

 

 

  1. A urine specimen for reagent strip glucose analysis can be preserved using all of the following methods except:
  2. Refrigeration
  3. Boric acid
  4. Sodium fluoride
  5. Commercial tablets

 

ANS: C

DIF: Level 1

OBJ: 8

TOP: Specimen collection/handling

 

 

 

  1. A urine specimen containing a large amount of precipitated amorphous material may have been preserved using:
  2. Refrigeration
  3. Phenol
  4. Formalin
  5. Toluene

 

ANS: A

DIF: Level 2

OBJ: 7

TOP: Specimen collection/handling

 

 

 

  1. In the laboratory, the preferred method of urine preservation is:
  2. Refrigeration
  3. Boric acid
  4. Sodium fluoride
  5. Commercial tablets

 

ANS: A

DIF: Level 1

OBJ: 9

TOP: Specimen collection/handling

 

 

 

  1. A specimen for routine urinalysis and culture can be preserved using:
  2. Sodium fluoride
  3. Boric acid
  4. Formalin
  5. Toluene

 

ANS: B

DIF: Level 1

OBJ: 9

TOP: Specimen collection/handling

 

 

 

  1. All of the following are good preservatives of urinary cellular elements except:
  2. Boric acid
  3. Formalin
  4. Sodium fluoride
  5. Thymol

 

ANS: C

DIF: Level 1

OBJ: 9

TOP: Specimen collection/handling

 

 

 

  1. Before analysis, a refrigerated urine specimen must be:
  2. Warmed to 37oC
  3. Examined for crystal formation
  4. Examined for changes in color
  5. Returned to room temperature

 

ANS: D

DIF: Level 1

OBJ: 9

TOP: Specimen collection/handling

 

 

 

  1. The recommended specimen for routine urinalysis testing is the:
  2. Random specimen
  3. Timed specimen
  4. First morning specimen
  5. Catheterized specimen

 

ANS: C

DIF: Level 1

OBJ: 11

TOP: Types of specimens

 

 

 

  1. The required specimen for quantitative analysis of urinary constituents is the:
  2. Midstream clean-catch specimen
  3. First morning specimen
  4. Random specimen
  5. Timed specimen

 

ANS: D

DIF: Level 1

OBJ: 11

TOP: Types of specimens

 

 

 

  1. A first morning specimen is frequently requested to confirm:
  2. Orthostatic proteinuria
  3. Fanconi’s syndrome
  4. Urinary tract infection
  5. Antidiuretic hormone (ADH) deficiency

 

ANS: A

DIF: Level 1

OBJ: 11

TOP: Types of specimens

 

 

 

  1. The first morning specimen from a patient with no history of symptoms for diabetes is positive for glucose. The patient should:
  2. Be given a glucose tolerance test
  3. Be asked to collect the second morning specimen
  4. Be asked to collect a timed specimen
  5. Be tested for renal tubular damage

 

ANS: B

DIF: Level 2

OBJ: 11

TOP: Types of specimens

 

 

 

  1. The specimen of choice for routine urinalysis is the first morning urine because it:
  2. Has a high volume
  3. Is produced while the body is in a resting state
  4. Is more dilute to prevent false-positive reactions
  5. Is more concentrated to better detect abnormalities

 

ANS: D

DIF: Level 2

OBJ: 11

TOP: Types of specimens

 

 

 

  1. All of the following specimens are acceptable for a urine culture except:
  2. Catheterized specimen
  3. Timed specimen
  4. Suprapubic aspiration
  5. Midstream clean-catch specimen

 

ANS: B

DIF: Level 1

OBJ: 11

TOP: Types of specimens

 

 

 

  1. Quantitation of a substance that varies with daily activities should be performed on a:
  2. Timed overnight specimen
  3. First morning specimen
  4. 24-hour specimen
  5. 2-hour postprandial specimen

 

ANS: C

DIF: Level 2

OBJ: 11

TOP: Types of specimens

 

 

 

  1. Failure to empty the bladder before beginning the collection of a timed urine specimen will:
  2. Cause falsely increased results
  3. Affect the preservation of glucose
  4. Cause falsely decreased results
  5. Adversely affect culture results

 

ANS: A

DIF: Level 2

OBJ: 10

TOP: Types of specimens

 

 

 

  1. An alternative to the catheterized specimen is the:
  2. Fasting specimen
  3. First morning specimen
  4. Midstream clean-catch specimen
  5. Three glass collection

 

ANS: C

DIF: Level 1

OBJ: 11

TOP: Types of specimens

 

 

 

  1. The least contaminated specimen for bacterial culture is the:
  2. Catheterized specimen
  3. Suprapubic aspiration
  4. Three glass collection
  5. Midstream clean-catch specimen

 

ANS: B

DIF: Level 2

OBJ: 11

TOP: Types of specimens

 

 

 

  1. The three glass collection is used for the diagnosis of:
  2. Bladder cancer
  3. Urinary tract infection
  4. Diabetes mellitus
  5. Prostate infection

 

ANS: D

DIF: Level 1

OBJ: 11

TOP: Types of specimens

 

 

 

  1. Documentation of appropriate handling of specimens for drug analysis is provided by the:
  2. Urinalysis supervisor
  3. Physician
  4. Temperature readings
  5. Chain of custody form

 

ANS: D

DIF: Level 1

OBJ: 11

TOP: Types of specimens

 

 

 

  1. The liver breaks down protein to form what waste product?
  2. Urea
  3. Amino acids
  4. Sodium
  5. Chloride

 

ANS: A

DIF: Level 1

OBJ: 1

TOP: Urinalysis composition

 

 

 

  1. An increase in urine production during the night is described as:
  2. Anuria
  3. Oliguria
  4. Polyuria
  5. Nocturia

 

ANS: D

DIF: Level 1

OBJ: 3

TOP: Urine volume

 

 

 

  1. Where should labels on urine specimen containers be placed?
  2. Container
  3. Lid
  4. Bottom
  5. Placement does not matter

 

ANS: A

DIF: Level 1

OBJ: 6

TOP: Specimen collection/handling

 

 

 

  1. Increased turbidity in urine stored at room temperature is usually caused by:
  2. Evaporation
  3. White blood cells
  4. Bacterial growth
  5. Protein precipitation

 

ANS: C

DIF: Level 1

OBJ: 7

TOP: Specimen collection/handling

 

 

 

  1. What is the maximum length of time a urine specimen can remain unpreserved at room temperature before testing?
  2. 30 minutes
  3. 2 hours
  4. 3 hours
  5. 6 hours

 

ANS: B

DIF: Level 1

OBJ: 8

TOP: Specimen collection/handling

 

 

 

  1. Which specimen(s) from a three glass collection do(es) not have to be examined microscopically?
  2. #1
  3. #2
  4. #3
  5. All should be examined

 

ANS: B

DIF: Level 2

OBJ: 11

TOP: Types of specimens

 

 

 

Matching

 

 

 

State whether the following actions will cause false-positive or false-negative test results:

  1. False-positive
  2. False-negative

 

  1. The temperature of a specimen for drug testing is 25oC when measured within 4 minutes of collection.
  2. The second sample of a three glass collection has a positive urine culture.
  3. A patient is deprived of fluids during a 6-hour timed urine collection.
  4. Aliquots from 24-hour specimens are being obtained before measuring and mixing the sample.

 

41. ANS: B DIF: Level 2 OBJ: 11

 

TOP: Types of specimens case study
42. ANS: A DIF: Level 2 OBJ: 11 TOP: Types of specimens case study
43. ANS: B DIF: Level 2 OBJ: 11 TOP: Types of specimens case study
44. ANS: B DIF: Level 2 OBJ: 11 TOP: Types of specimens case study

 

 

 

True/False

 

 

 

  1. Urine contains organic and inorganic chemicals that can vary with body metabolic functions.

 

ANS: True

DIF: Level 1

OBJ:1

TOP: Urinalysis composition

 

 

 

  1. Physicians performing urinalysis can determine whether a specimen is urine from the presence of formed elements.

 

ANS: False

DIF: Level 1

OBJ: 2

TOP: Urinalysis composition

 

 

 

  1. Dietary intake does not influence urine volume.

 

ANS: False

DIF: Level 2

OBJ: 3

TOP: Urinalysis volume

 

 

 

  1. Polydipsia is a symptom of both diabetes mellitus and diabetes insipidus.

 

ANS: True

DIF: Level 1

OBJ: 3

TOP: Urine volume

 

 

 

  1. A urine specimen label should include the date and time of collection.

 

ANS: True

DIF: Level 1

OBJ: 5

TOP: Specimen collection/handling

 

 

 

  1. Urine that remains unpreserved at room temperature will show an increase in the concentrations of nitrate, glucose, and white blood cells.

 

ANS: False

DIF: Level 1

OBJ: 7

TOP: Specimen collection/handling

 

 

 

  1. A specimen delivered to the laboratory in a gray-top Vacutainer is acceptable for urinalysis.

 

ANS: False

DIF: Level 2

OBJ: 9

TOP: Specimen collection/handling

 

 

 

  1. A urine bacterial culture should not be performed on a catheterized specimen.

 

ANS: False

DIF: Level 2

OBJ: 10

TOP: Types of specimens

 

Chapter 4: Physical Examination of Urine

 

 

 

Multiple Choice

 

 

 

  1. The primary pigment responsible for normal urine color is:
  2. Uroerythrin
  3. Urochrome
  4. Hemoglobin
  5. Bilirubin

 

ANS: B

DIF: Level 1

OBJ: 1

TOP: Normal urine color

 

 

 

  1. A dark yellow urine producing yellow foam may contain:
  2. Hemoglobin
  3. Protein
  4. Red blood cells
  5. Bilirubin

 

ANS: D

DIF: Level 1

OBJ: 3

TOP: Abnormal urine color

 

 

 

  1. Which of the following urine colors and causes match?
  2. Red—carotene
  3. Dark yellow—porphyrins
  4. Black—melanin
  5. Green—pyridium

 

ANS: C

DIF: Level 2

OBJ: 5

TOP: Abnormal Rrine color

 

 

 

  1. The color of a urine specimen containing blood can be attributed to all of the following except the:
  2. Amount of blood
  3. Blood type of patient
  4. pH of the urine
  5. Length of contact

 

ANS: B

DIF: Level 2

OBJ: 4

TOP: Abnormal urine color

 

 

 

  1. A urine specimen that turns black after standing may contain:
  2. Porphobilinogen
  3. Homogentisic acid
  4. Carboxyhemoglobin
  5. Myoglobin

 

ANS: B

DIF: Level 1

OBJ: 5

TOP: Abnormal urine color

 

 

 

  1. Which of the following specific gravity readings correlates with a pale yellow urine?
  2. 1.005
  3. 1.015
  4. 1.025
  5. 1.035

 

ANS: A

DIF: Level 2

OBJ: 11

TOP: Urine color

 

 

 

  1. Specimens that contain intact red blood cells can be visually distinguished from specimens that contain hemoglobin because:
  2. Hemoglobin produces a brighter red color
  3. Hemoglobin produces a cloudy pink specimen
  4. Intact red blood cells produce a cloudy specimen
  5. Intact red blood cells are rapidly converted to hemoglobin

 

ANS: C

DIF: Level 2

OBJ: 10

TOP: Urine clarity

 

 

 

  1. Urine from a patient diagnosed with hepatitis will appear:
  2. Pale yellow
  3. Amber
  4. Red
  5. Brown

 

ANS: B

DIF: Level 2

OBJ: 3

TOP: Urine color

 

 

 

  1. The pigment responsible for a pink precipitate in refrigerated urine is:
  2. Uroerythrin
  3. Urochrome
  4. Bilirubin
  5. Biliverdin

 

ANS: A

DIF: Level 1

OBJ: 9

TOP: Urine clarity

 

 

 

  1. The presence of a white precipitate in freshly voided urine can be caused by:
  2. Amorphous urates in alkaline urine
  3. Amorphous urates in acid urine
  4. Amorphous phosphates in alkaline urine
  5. Amorphous phosphates in acid urine

 

ANS: C

DIF: Level 1

OBJ: 9 and 10

TOP: Nonpathologic turbidity

 

 

 

  1. The addition of dilute acetic acid to a cloudy urine specimen will dissolve:
  2. Amorphous urates
  3. White blood cells
  4. Yeast
  5. Amorphous phosphate

 

ANS: D

DIF: Level 1

OBJ: 9

TOP: Nonpathologic turbidity

 

 

 

  1. Slightly warming a turbid urine specimen may dissolve:
  2. Talcum powder
  3. Amorphous urates
  4. Amorphous phosphate
  5. Radiographic contrast media

 

ANS: B

DIF: Level 1

OBJ: 9

TOP: Nonpathologic turbidity

 

 

 

  1. An antidiuretic hormone deficiency is associated with a:
  2. Specific gravity close to 1.025
  3. Low specific gravity
  4. High specific gravity
  5. Variable specific gravity

 

ANS: B

DIF: Level 2

OBJ: 11

TOP: Specific gravity

 

 

 

  1. The specific gravity of urine is directly proportional to its:
  2. Turbidity
  3. Dissolved solids
  4. Salt content
  5. Glucose content

 

ANS: B

DIF: Level 1

OBJ: 11

TOP: Specific gravity

 

 

 

  1. A patient that has been diagnosed with diabetes mellitus will produce urine with:
  2. Increased volume and decreased specific gravity
  3. Decreased volume and decreased specific gravity
  4. Increased volume and increased specific gravity
  5. Decreased volume and increased specific gravity

 

ANS: C

DIF: Level 2

OBJ: 11

TOP: Specific gravity

 

 

 

  1. If a refractometer reads 1.003 with distilled water, the technologist should:
  2. Subtract 0.003 from the specimen results
  3. Add 0.003 to the specimen results
  4. Use a urinometer to measure the specific gravity
  5. Calibrate the refractometer by adjusting the set screw

 

ANS: D

DIF: Level 1

OBJ: 12

TOP: Specific gravity

 

 

 

  1. A urine with the same specific gravity as the ultrafiltrate is called:
  2. Isosthenuric
  3. Hyposthenuric
  4. Ultrasthenuric
  5. Hypersthenuric

 

ANS: A

DIF: Level 1

OBJ: 11

TOP: Specific gravity

 

 

 

  1. A specimen with a specific gravity of 1.040 and a 1+ glucose and a negative reagent strip protein is most likely caused by:
  2. Glucose
  3. Protein
  4. Diabetes insipidus
  5. Radiographic contrast media

 

ANS: D

DIF: Level 2

OBJ: 14

TOP: Specific gravity

 

 

 

  1. A patient has the following readings on two different urine specimens:

    Which of the following statements best describes these results?
  2. The protein and glucose in Specimen B are falsely elevated because of the specific gravity.
  3. The results of Specimen A are falsely decreased because of the specific gravity.
  4. The microscopic findings in Specimen A are decreased because of the pH.
  5. The microscopic findings in Specimen B are increased because of the glucose.

 

ANS: B

DIF: Level 3

OBJ: 11

TOP: Specific gravity

 

 

 

  1. A urine specific gravity measured by refractometer is 1.028, and the urine temperature is 29oC. The specific gravity should be reported as:
  2. 1.020
  3. 1.025
  4. 1.028
  5. 1.031

 

ANS: C

DIF: Level 2

OBJ: 12

TOP: Specific gravity

 

 

 

  1. The refractive index compares:
  2. Light velocity in solutions with light velocity in solids
  3. Light velocity in air with light velocity in solutions
  4. Light scattering by air with light scattering by solutions
  5. Light scattering by particles in solutions

 

ANS: B

DIF: Level 1

OBJ: 12

TOP: Specific gravity

 

 

 

  1. Specific gravity is a measure of:
  2. Particle numbers
  3. Molecular weight
  4. Molarity
  5. Density

 

ANS: D

DIF: Level 1

OBJ: 12

TOP: Specific gravity

 

 

 

  1. A urine specimen is diluted 1:10, and the specific gravity reads 1.006. The actual specific gravity is:
  2. 1.006
  3. 1.016
  4. 1.060
  5. 10.006

 

ANS: C

DIF: Level 2

OBJ: 12

TOP: Specific gravity

 

 

 

  1. Which of the following statements concerning measurement of specific gravity by refractometer is not true?
  2. The refractometer must be calibrated after every specimen.
  3. This method is not affected by the temperature of the specimen.
  4. This method measures dissolved particles in the urine.
  5. The method requires less than 1 mL of urine.

 

ANS: A

DIF: Level 1

OBJ: 12

TOP: Specific gravity

 

 

 

  1. The calibration of the refractometer can be quality-controlled using all of the following except:
  2. Distilled water
  3. 5% NaCl
  4. 9% sucrose
  5. Commercial controls

 

ANS: A

DIF: Level 1

OBJ: 12

TOP: Specific gravity

 

 

 

  1. Results of a specific gravity reading obtained by refractometer in the urology clinic do not agree with the readings obtained by the laboratory’s automated reagent strip reader. The laboratory should:
  2. Recalibrate the reagent strip reader
  3. Check the calibration of the refractometer in the clinic
  4. Request the clinic to collect new specimens
  5. Report the results from the reagent strip reader

 

ANS: D

DIF: Level 3

OBJ: 12

TOP: Specific gravity

 

 

 

  1. Bacterial decomposition of urea produces urine that has an odor resembling:
  2. Aromatic amines
  3. Asparagus
  4. Ammonia
  5. Bleach

 

ANS: C

DIF: Level 1

OBJ: 16

TOP: Urine odor

 

 

 

Multiple Choice

 

 

 

NARRBEGIN: 04-nar-01

A urine turns black after standing, develops a cloudy white precipitate, and has a specific gravity of 1.010.

NARREND

 

 

  1. Based on the information provided, the primary concern about this specimen is:
  2. Color
  3. Turbidity
  4. Specific gravity
  5. None of the above

 

ANS: A

NAR: 04-nar-01

DIF: Level 2

OBJ: 2

TOP: Abnormal urine color

 

 

 

  1. Based on the information provided, the most likely cause of the black color in this specimen is:
  2. Methemoglobin
  3. Methyldopa
  4. Melanin
  5. Homogentisic acid

 

ANS: D

NAR: 04-nar-01

DIF: Level 3

OBJ: 5

TOP: Abnormal Urine color

 

 

 

  1. Based on the information provided, the most probable cause of the white precipitate is:
  2. Amorphous urates
  3. Lipids
  4. Amorphous phosphates
  5. Radiographic contrast media

 

ANS: C

NAR: 04-nar-01

DIF: Level 2

OBJ: 9

TOP: Urine clarity

 

 

 

  1. Based on the information provided, the primary basis for the changes that took place in this specimen is:
  2. Photo-oxidation
  3. Exposure over time to ambient air
  4. Specimen contamination during handling
  5. Evaporation of specimen

 

ANS: B

Nar: 04-nar-01

DIF: Level 3

OBJ: 5

TOP: Urine clarity

 

 

 

True/False

 

 

 

  1. A urine specimen that remains at room temperature for several hours may develop a darker yellow color.

 

ANS: True

DIF: Level 1

OBJ: 3

TOP: Urine color

 

 

 

  1. A pale yellow urine is a primary indication of impaired renal function.

 

ANS: False

DIF: Level 1

OBJ: 2

TOP: Urine color

 

 

 

  1. Clear red urine and red plasma are associated with myoglobinuria.

 

ANS: False

DIF: Level 1

OBJ: 4

TOP: Abnormal urine color

 

 

 

  1. Collection of a midstream clean-catch specimen can affect the clarity of a urine specimen.

 

ANS: True

DIF: Level 2

OBJ: 7

TOP: Urine clarity

 

 

 

  1. A clear yellow urine will not contain any pathologically significant constituents.

 

ANS: False

DIF: Level 1

OBJ: 7

TOP: Urine clarity

 

 

 

  1. Urine specific gravity can be measured by both physical and chemical methods.

 

ANS: True

DIF: Level 1

OBJ: 11

TOP: Specific gravity

 

 

 

  1. Urine specific gravity is equally influenced by the presence of glucose and sodium.

 

ANS: False

DIF: Level 1

OBJ: 13

TOP: Specific gravity

 

 

 

  1. The density of a urine specimen can affect the frequency of a sound wave.

 

ANS: True

DIF: Level 1

OBJ: 11

TOP: Specific gravity

 

 

 

  1. A supervisor should be concerned if a specific gravity reading of 1.008 is reported on a turbid urine specimen.

 

ANS: False

DIF: Level 3

OBJ: 10

TOP: Specimen quality

 

 

 

Matching

 

 

 

State whether the following specimens are acceptable or unacceptable for routine urinalysis testing:

  1. Acceptable
  2. Unacceptable

 

  1. A clear, pale yellow specimen with a specific gravity of 1.030
  2. A cloudy, brown-black urine with a positive test for blood and a strong odor of ammonia
  3. A hazy, yellow urine that produces a noticeable amount of white foam
  4. A port wine–colored specimen with a negative test for blood
  5. A pale yellow urine with a noticeable odor of bleach

 

41. ANS: A DIF: Level 3 OBJ: 11 TOP: Specimen quality case study
42. ANS: B DIF: Level 3 OBJ: 5 and 16 TOP: Specimen quality case study
43. ANS: A DIF: Level 3 OBJ: 7 TOP: Specimen quality case study
44. ANS: A DIF: Level 3 OBJ: 4 TOP: Specimen quality case study
45. ANS: B DIF: Level 2 OBJ: 16 TOP: Specimen quality case study

 

 

 

Indicate whether each of the following substances causes clinically significant or nonsignificant urine turbidity:

  1. Significant
  2. Nonsignificant

 

  1. White blood cells
  2. Radiographic contrast media
  3. Squamous epithelial cells
  4. Bacteria
  5. Lipids
  6. Amorphous urates

 

46. ANS: A DIF: Level 1 OBJ: 7 TOP: Urine clarity
47. ANS: B DIF: Level 1 OBJ: 7 TOP: Urine clarity
48. ANS: B DIF: Level 1 OBJ: 7 TOP: Urine clarity
49. ANS: A DIF: Level 1 OBJ: 7 TOP: Urine clarity
50. ANS: A DIF: Level 1 OBJ: 7 TOP: Urine clarity
51. ANS: B DIF: Level 1 OBJ: 9 TOP: Urine clarity

 

 

 

Match the following urine colors with their cause. (Some answer options may be used twice or not at all):

  1. Amber
  2. Green
  3. Pale yellow
  4. Black
  5. Red
  6. Dark yellow

 

  1. Melanin
  2. Clorets
  3. Polydipsia
  4. Porphobilinogen
  5. Pseudomonas infection
  6. Beets
  7. Bilirubin

 

52. ANS: D DIF: Level 1 OBJ: 5 TOP: Urine color
53. ANS: B DIF: Level 1 OBJ: 3 TOP: Urine color
54. ANS: C DIF: Level 1 OBJ: 7 TOP: Urine color
55. ANS: E DIF: Level 1 OBJ: 4 TOP: Urine color
56. ANS: B DIF: Level 1 OBJ: 3 TOP: Urine color
57. ANS: E DIF: Level 1 OBJ: 4 TOP: Urine color
58. ANS: F DIF: Level 1 OBJ: 3 TOP: Urine color

 

 

 

Match the following conditions with their urine odor (Some answer options may be used twice or not at all):

  1. Fruity
  2. Ammonia
  3. Bleach
  4. Aromatic

 

  1. Normal urine
  2. Bacterial infection
  3. Diabetes mellitus

 

59. ANS: D DIF: Level 1 OBJ: 16 TOP: Urine odor
60. ANS: B DIF: Level 1 OBJ: 16 TOP: Urine odor
61. ANS: A DIF: Level 1 OBJ: 16 TOP: Urine odor

 

 

 

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