Test Bank For Illustrated Anatomy Of the Head and Neck 5th edition by Susan W. Herring

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Illustrated Anatomy Of the Head and Neck 5th edition by Susan W. Herring – 
Test Bank 

 

Chapter 01: Introduction to Head and Neck Anatomy

Fehrenbach: Illustrated Anatomy of the Head and Neck, 5th Edition

 

MULTIPLE CHOICE

 

  1. Which surface of the body is visualized by the clinician when performing an extraoral examination of the patient’s eyes?
a. Anterior
b. Posterior
c. Superior
d. Lateral

 

 

ANS:  A

 

  Feedback
A The patient’s eyes are visualized on the anterior surface of the patient’s body.
B The patient’s eyes would NOT be easily visualized on the posterior of the patient’s body.
C The patient’s eyes would NOT be easily visualized on the superior surface of the patient’s body.
D The patient’s eyes would NOT be easily visualized on the lateral surface of the patient’s body.

 

 

DIF:    Comprehension                              REF:   p. 3                OBJ:   2

TOP:   CDA: General Chairside, I. B. Preliminary Physical Examination

MSC:  NBDHE, Scientific Basis for Dental Hygiene Practice, 1.1.1 Head and Neck Anatomy

 

  1. Which of the following is CORRECT concerning the sagittal plane of the body?
a. Parallel to the median plane
b. Parallel to the frontal plane
c. Parallel to the horizontal plane
d. Parallel to the coronal plane

 

 

ANS:  A

 

  Feedback
A A sagittal plane is parallel to the median plane.
B A sagittal plane is NOT parallel to the frontal plane but perpendicular.
C A horizontal plane is perpendicular to the median plane. A sagittal plane is parallel to the median plane. Thus a horizontal plane is perpendicular to a sagittal plane.
D A sagittal plane is NOT parallel to the coronal plane but perpendicular.

 

 

DIF:    Recall             REF:   p. 3                OBJ:   1

TOP:   CDA: General Chairside, I. A. Demonstrate understanding of basic oral and dental anatomy, physiology, and development

MSC:  NBDHE, Scientific Basis for Dental Hygiene Practice, 1.1 Anatomy

 

  1. When a patient is in anatomic position, what is the surface of the palms of the hand considered?
a. Anterior
b. Lateral
c. Medial
d. Posterior

 

 

ANS:  A

 

  Feedback
A The palms of the hands in anatomic position are facing toward the front and are anterior (or ventral).
B The palms of the hands in anatomic position are NOT facing lateral or away from the median plane but are facing toward the front and are anterior (or ventral).
C The palms of the hands in anatomic position are NOT facing medial or toward the median plane but are facing toward the front and are anterior (or ventral).
D The palms of the hands in anatomic position are NOT facing toward the posterior or back of the body but are facing toward the front and are anterior (or ventral).

 

 

DIF:    Recall             REF:   p. 3                OBJ:   2

TOP:   CDA: General Chairside, I. B. Preliminary Physical Examination

MSC:  NBDHE, Provision of Clinical Dental Hygiene Services, 1.0 Assessing Patient Characteristics

 

  1. What is the anatomic relationship of the right arm to the left leg?
a. Sagittal
b. Contralateral
c. Ipsilateral
d. Midsagittal

 

 

ANS:  B

 

  Feedback
A The two legs are contralateral to each other. Sagittal describes a plane of division of the body created by an imaginary plane parallel to the median plane.
B Contralateral structures are located on the opposite side of the body, which is the anatomic relationship of the right arm to the left leg.
C Ipsilateral refers to structures on the same side of the body; in contrast, the two legs are contralateral to each other and thus are located on the opposite side of the body.
D The two legs are contralateral to each other. Midsagittal describes a plane that divides the body into right and left halves.

 

 

DIF:    Comprehension                              REF:   p. 3                OBJ:   2

TOP:   CDA: General Chairside, I. A. Demonstrate understanding of basic oral and dental anatomy, physiology, and development

MSC:  NBDHE, Scientific Basis for Dental Hygiene Practice, 1.1 Anatomy

 

  1. What is the anatomic relationship of the muscles to the skin?
a. Anterior
b. External
c. Deep
d. Superficial

 

 

ANS:  C

 

  Feedback
A Muscles are deep to the skin.
B Muscles are deep to the skin.
C Muscles are located inward, away from the body surface, deep to the skin.
D Muscles are deep to the skin.

 

 

DIF:    Comprehension                              REF:   p. 3                OBJ:   2

TOP:   CDA: General Chairside, I. A. Demonstrate understanding of basic oral and dental anatomy, physiology, and development

MSC:  NBDHE, Scientific Basis for Dental Hygiene Practice, 1.1 Anatomy

 

  1. What is the anatomic relationship of the shoulders to the hips?
a. Deep
b. Medial
c. Inferior
d. Superior

 

 

ANS:  D

 

  Feedback
A The shoulders are superior to the hips.
B The shoulders are superior to the hips.
C The shoulders are superior to the hips.
D The shoulders are superior to or closer to the head than the hips.

 

 

DIF:    Comprehension                              REF:   p. 3                OBJ:   2

TOP:   CDA: General Chairside, I. A. Demonstrate understanding of basic oral and dental anatomy, physiology, and development

MSC:  NBDHE, Scientific Basis for Dental Hygiene Practice, 1.1 Anatomy

 

  1. Which of the following is meant by the term “ventral”?
a. Back of an area of the body
b. Front of an area of the body
c. Inner side of an area of the body
d. Outer side of an area of the body

 

 

ANS:  B

 

  Feedback
A The back of an area of the body is referred to as the posterior surface.
B The front of an area of the body is referred to as the ventral surface.
C The inner side of an area of the body, away from the body surface, is referred to as deep.
D The outside of an area of the body, toward the surface, is referred to as superficial.

 

 

DIF:    Recall             REF:   p. 3                OBJ:   1

TOP:   CDA: General Chairside, I. A. Demonstrate understanding of basic oral and dental anatomy, physiology, and development

MSC:  NBDHE, Scientific Basis for Dental Hygiene Practice, 1.1 Anatomy

 

  1. Which of the following describes a patient’s eyes when they are in anatomic position?
a. Closed tightly
b. Looking toward the lateral
c. Looking toward the medial
d. Looking straight forward

 

 

ANS:  D

 

  Feedback
A The patient’s eyes in anatomic position are open and look forward.
B The patient’s eyes in anatomic position are open and look forward.
C The patient’s eyes in anatomic position are open and look forward.
D The patient’s eyes in anatomic position are open and look forward.

 

 

DIF:    Recall             REF:   p. 2                OBJ:   2

TOP:   CDA: General Chairside, I. B. Preliminary Physical Examination

MSC:  NBDHE, Scientific Basis for Dental Hygiene Practice, 1.1.1 Head and Neck Anatomy

 

  1. What is the anatomic relationship of the maxillary arch to the mandibular arch?
a. Deep
b. Inferior
c. Superior
d. Superficial

 

 

ANS:  C

 

  Feedback
A The maxillary arch is superior to the mandibular arch. Deep refers to structures that are located away from the body surface.
B The maxillary arch is superior to the mandibular arch. Inferior refers to surfaces closer to the feet or that face toward the feet.
C The maxillary arch is superior to the mandibular arch.
D The maxillary arch is superior to the mandibular arch. Superficial refers to structures located toward the surface of the body.

 

 

DIF:    Comprehension                              REF:   p. 3                OBJ:   2

TOP:   CDA: General Chairside, I. A. Demonstrate understanding of basic oral and dental anatomy, physiology, and development

MSC:  NBDHE, Scientific Basis for Dental Hygiene Practice, 1.1.1 Head and Neck Anatomy

 

  1. What is the anatomic relationship of the teeth located in the front of the mouth to the teeth located in the back of the mouth?
a. Anterior
b. Medial
c. Posterior
d. Superficial

 

 

ANS:  C

 

  Feedback
A Teeth located in the back of the mouth are considered posterior. Teeth located in the front of the mouth are considered anterior.
B Medial refers to structures located closer to the median plane.
C Teeth located in the back of the mouth are considered posterior to teeth located in the front of the mouth, which are considered anterior.
D Superficial refers to structures located closer to the surface of the body.

 

 

DIF:    Comprehension                              REF:   p. 3                OBJ:   2

TOP:   CDA: General Chairside, I. A. Demonstrate understanding of basic oral and dental anatomy, physiology, and development

MSC:  NBDHE, Scientific Basis for Dental Hygiene Practice, 1.1.2 Dental Anatomy

 

  1. The inner side of the wall of a hollow structure is referred to as internal. In contrast, the outer side of the wall of a hollow structure is external.
a. Both statements are true.
b. Both statements are false.
c. The first statement is true; the second is false.
d. The first statement is false; the second is true.

 

 

ANS:  A

 

  Feedback
A Both statements are true. The inner side of the wall of a hollow structure is referred to as internal. The outer side of the wall of a hollow structure is external.
B Both statements are true. The inner side of the wall of a hollow structure is referred to as internal. The outer side of the wall of a hollow structure is external.
C Both statements are true. The inner side of the wall of a hollow structure is referred to as internal. The outer side of the wall of a hollow structure is external.
D Both statements are true. The inner side of the wall of a hollow structure is referred to as internal. The outer side of the wall of a hollow structure is external.

 

 

DIF:    Recall             REF:   p. 3                OBJ:   1

TOP:   CDA: General Chairside, I. A. Demonstrate understanding of basic oral and dental anatomy, physiology, and development

MSC:  NBDHE, Scientific Basis for Dental Hygiene Practice, 1.1 Anatomy

 

  1. What is another term for a transverse section?
a. Vertical section
b. Horizontal section
c. Anterior section
d. Posterior section

 

 

ANS:  B

 

  Feedback
A The transverse section or horizontal section is a division through a horizontal plane.
B The transverse section or horizontal section is a division through a horizontal plane.
C The transverse section or horizontal section is a division through a horizontal plane.
D The transverse section or horizontal section is a division through a horizontal plane.

 

 

DIF:    Recall             REF:   p. 3                OBJ:   1

TOP:   CDA: General Chairside, I. A. Demonstrate understanding of basic oral and dental anatomy, physiology, and development

MSC:  NBDHE, Scientific Basis for Dental Hygiene Practice, 1.1 Anatomy

 

  1. An area closer to the median plane is considered to be distal, and an area farther from the median plane is considered proximal.
a. Both statements are true.
b. Both statements are false.
c. The first statement is true; the second is false.
d. The first statement is false; the second is true.

 

 

ANS:  B

 

  Feedback
A Both statements are false. An area closer to the median plane is considered to be proximal, and an area farther from the median plane is considered distal.
B Both statements are false. An area closer to the median plane is considered to be proximal, and an area farther from the median plane is considered distal.
C Both statements are false. An area closer to the median plane is considered to be proximal, and an area farther from the median plane is considered distal.
D Both statements are false. An area closer to the median plane is considered to be proximal, and an area farther from the median plane is considered distal.

 

 

DIF:    Recall             REF:   p. 3                OBJ:   1

TOP:   CDA: General Chairside, I. A. Demonstrate understanding of basic oral and dental anatomy, physiology, and development

MSC:  NBDHE, Scientific Basis for Dental Hygiene Practice, 1.1 Anatomy

 

  1. Structures on the same side of the body are considered ipsilateral. Structures on the opposite side of the body are considered contralateral.
a. Both statements are true.
b. Both statements are false.
c. The first statement is true; the second is false.
d. The first statement is false; the second is true.

 

 

ANS:  A

 

  Feedback
A Both statements are true. Structures on the same side of the body are considered ipsilateral. Structures on the opposite side of the body are considered contralateral.
B Both statements are true. Structures on the same side of the body are considered ipsilateral. Structures on the opposite side of the body are considered contralateral.
C Both statements are true. Structures on the same side of the body are considered ipsilateral. Structures on the opposite side of the body are considered contralateral.
D Both statements are true. Structures on the same side of the body are considered ipsilateral. Structures on the opposite side of the body are considered contralateral.

 

 

DIF:    Recall             REF:   p. 3                OBJ:   1

TOP:   CDA: General Chairside, I. A. Demonstrate understanding of basic oral and dental anatomy, physiology, and development

MSC:  NBDHE, Scientific Basis for Dental Hygiene Practice, 1.1 Anatomy

 

  1. The number of bones and muscles in the head and neck is NOT usually constant, and specific details of these structures can vary from patient to patient.
a. Both statements are true.
b. Both statements are false.
c. The first statement is true; the second is false.
d. The first statement is false; the second is true.

 

 

ANS:  D

 

  Feedback
A The first statement is false; the second is true. The number of bones and muscles in the head and neck is usually constant, but specific details of these structures can vary from patient to patient.
B The first statement is false; the second is true. The number of bones and muscles in the head and neck is usually constant, but specific details of these structures can vary from patient to patient.
C The first statement is false; the second is true. The number of bones and muscles in the head and neck is usually constant, but specific details of these structures can vary from patient to patient.
D The first statement is false; the second is true. The number of bones and muscles in the head and neck is usually constant, but specific details of these structures can vary from patient to patient.

 

 

DIF:    Comprehension                              REF:   p. 3                OBJ:   3

TOP:   CDA: General Chairside, I. B. Preliminary Physical Examination

MSC:  NBDHE, Provision of Clinical Dental Hygiene Services, 1.0 Assessing Patient Characteristics

 

  1. The median plane is created by an imaginary line dividing the body into equal right and left halves. On the surface of the body, these halves are NEVER symmetric in structure.
a. Both statements are true.
b. Both statements are false.
c. The first statement is true; the second is false.
d. The first statement is false; the second is true.

 

 

ANS:  C

 

  Feedback
A The first statement is true; the second is false. The median plane or midsagittal plane is created by an imaginary line dividing the body into equal right and left halves. On the surface of the body, these halves are generally symmetric in structure, yet the same symmetry does NOT apply to all internal structures.
B The first statement is true; the second is false. The median plane or midsagittal plane is created by an imaginary line dividing the body into equal right and left halves. On the surface of the body, these halves are generally symmetric in structure, yet the same symmetry does NOT apply to all internal structures.
C The first statement is true; the second is false. The median plane or midsagittal plane is created by an imaginary line dividing the body into equal right and left halves. On the surface of the body, these halves are generally symmetric in structure, yet the same symmetry does NOT apply to all internal structures.
D The first statement is true; the second is false. The median plane or midsagittal plane is created by an imaginary line dividing the body into equal right and left halves. On the surface of the body, these halves are generally symmetric in structure, yet the same symmetry does NOT apply to all internal structures.

 

 

DIF:    Recall             REF:   p. 3                OBJ:   2

TOP:   CDA: General Chairside, I. A. Demonstrate understanding of basic oral and dental anatomy, physiology, and development

MSC:  NBDHE, Scientific Basis for Dental Hygiene Practice, 1.1 Anatomy

 

  1. An area closer to the median plane of the body or structure is considered lateral. An area farther from the median plane of the body or structure is considered proximal.
a. Both statements are true.
b. Both statements are false.
c. The first statement is true; the second is false.
d. The first statement is false; the second is true.

 

 

ANS:  B

 

  Feedback
A Both statements are false. An area closer to the median plane of the body or structure is considered medial. An area farther from the median plane of the body or structure is considered lateral, and an area closer to the median plane is considered to be proximal.
B Both statements are false. An area closer to the median plane of the body or structure is considered medial. An area farther from the median plane of the body or structure is considered lateral, and an area closer to the median plane is considered to be proximal. Within the dentition, the proximal surface would be considered mesial.
C Both statements are false. An area closer to the median plane of the body or structure is considered medial. An area farther from the median plane of the body or structure is considered lateral, and an area closer to the median plane is considered to be proximal.
D Both statements are false. An area closer to the median plane of the body or structure is considered medial. An area farther from the median plane of the body or structure is considered lateral, and an area closer to the median plane is considered to be proximal.

 

 

DIF:    Recall             REF:   p. 3                OBJ:   2

TOP:   CDA: General Chairside, I. A. Demonstrate understanding of basic oral and dental anatomy, physiology, and development

MSC:  NBDHE, Scientific Basis for Dental Hygiene Practice, 1.1 Anatomy

 

  1. What is another term for coronal plane?
a. Frontal plane
b. Coronal section
c. Horizontal plane
d. Horizontal section

 

 

ANS:  A

 

  Feedback
A A frontal plane or coronal plane is created by an imaginary line dividing the body at any level into both anterior and posterior parts.
B The frontal plane or coronal section is a division through any frontal plane.
C A horizontal plane is created by an imaginary line dividing the body at any level into superior and inferior parts and is always perpendicular to the median plane.
D The transverse section or horizontal section is a division through a horizontal plane.

 

 

DIF:    Recall             REF:   p. 3                OBJ:   1

TOP:   CDA: General Chairside, I. A. Demonstrate understanding of basic oral and dental anatomy, physiology, and development

MSC:  NBDHE, Scientific Basis for Dental Hygiene Practice, 1.1 Anatomy

 

  1. Muscles may differ in size and details of their attachments. Joints, vessels, nerves, glands, lymph nodes, fasciae, and spaces of an individual can vary in size, location, and even presence.
a. Both statements are true.
b. Both statements are false.
c. The first statement is true; the second is false.
d. The first statement is false; the second is true.

 

 

ANS:  A

 

  Feedback
A Both statements are true. Muscles may differ in size and details of their attachments. Joints, vessels, nerves, glands, lymph nodes, fasciae, and spaces of an individual can vary in size, location, and even presence.
B Both statements are true. Muscles may differ in size and details of their attachments. Joints, vessels, nerves, glands, lymph nodes, fasciae, and spaces of an individual can vary in size, location, and even presence.
C Both statements are true. Muscles may differ in size and details of their attachments. Joints, vessels, nerves, glands, lymph nodes, fasciae, and spaces of an individual can vary in size, location, and even presence.
D Both statements are true. Muscles may differ in size and details of their attachments. Joints, vessels, nerves, glands, lymph nodes, fasciae, and spaces of an individual can vary in size, location, and even presence.

 

 

DIF:    Comprehension                              REF:   p. 3                OBJ:   3

TOP:   CDA: General Chairside, I. A. Demonstrate understanding of basic oral and dental anatomy, physiology, and development

MSC:  NBDHE, Scientific Basis for Dental Hygiene Practice, 1.1 Anatomy

 

  1. What is another term for midsagittal plane?
a. Median plane
b. Coronal plane
c. Frontal plane
d. Horizontal plane

 

 

ANS:  A

 

  Feedback
A The median plane or midsagittal plane is created by an imaginary line dividing the body into equal right and left halves.
B A frontal plane or coronal plane is created by an imaginary line dividing the body at any level into anterior and posterior parts.
C A frontal plane or coronal plane is created by an imaginary line dividing the body at any level into anterior and posterior parts.
D A horizontal plane is created by an imaginary line dividing the body at any level into superior and inferior parts and is always perpendicular to the median plane.

 

 

DIF:    Recall             REF:   p. 3                OBJ:   1

TOP:   CDA: General Chairside, I. A. Demonstrate understanding of basic oral and dental anatomy, physiology, and development

MSC:  NBDHE, Scientific Basis for Dental Hygiene Practice, 1.1 Anatomy

 

  1. A horizontal plane is created by an imaginary line dividing the body at any level into both superior and inferior parts and is ALWAYS _______ to the median plane.
a. anterior
b. posterior
c. parallel
d. perpendicular

 

 

ANS:  D

 

  Feedback
A A frontal plane or coronal plane is created by an imaginary line dividing the body at any level into both anterior and posterior parts. A horizontal plane is created by an imaginary line dividing the body at any level into both superior and inferior parts and is always perpendicular to the median plane.
B A frontal plane or coronal plane is created by an imaginary line dividing the body at any level into both anterior and posterior parts. A horizontal plane is created by an imaginary line dividing the body at any level into both superior and inferior parts and is always perpendicular to the median plane.
C A sagittal plane is any plane created by an imaginary plane parallel to the median plane. A horizontal plane is created by an imaginary line dividing the body at any level into both superior and inferior parts and is always perpendicular to the median plane.
D A horizontal plane is created by an imaginary line dividing the body at any level into both superior and inferior parts and is always perpendicular to the median plane.

 

 

DIF:    Recall             REF:   p. 3                OBJ:   2

TOP:   CDA: General Chairside, I. A. Demonstrate understanding of basic oral and dental anatomy, physiology, and development

MSC:  NBDHE, Scientific Basis for Dental Hygiene Practice, 1.1 Anatomy

 

  1. The ventral part is directed toward the anterior and is considered the opposite of the dorsal part when considering the entire body.
a. Both statements are true.
b. Both statements are false.
c. The first statement is true; the second is false.
d. The first statement is false; the second is true.

 

 

ANS:  A

 

  Feedback
A Both statements are true. The ventral part is directed toward the anterior and is the opposite of the dorsal part when considering the entire body.
B Both statements are true. The ventral part is directed toward the anterior and is the opposite of the dorsal part when considering the entire body.
C Both statements are true. The ventral part is directed toward the anterior and is the opposite of the dorsal part when considering the entire body.
D Both statements are true. The ventral part is directed toward the anterior and is the opposite of the dorsal part when considering the entire body.

 

 

DIF:    Recall             REF:   p. 3                OBJ:   2

TOP:   CDA: General Chairside, I. A. Demonstrate understanding of basic oral and dental anatomy, physiology, and development

MSC:  NBDHE, Scientific Basis for Dental Hygiene Practice, 1.1 Anatomy

 

  1. The transverse section is a division through a _____ plane.
a. horizontal
b. frontal
c. sagittal
d. coronal

 

 

ANS:  A

 

  Feedback
A The transverse section or horizontal section is a division through a horizontal plane.
B The frontal section or coronal section is a division through any frontal plane.
C A sagittal plane is any plane created by an imaginary plane parallel to the median plane.
D A frontal plane or coronal plane is created by an imaginary line dividing the body at any level into anterior and posterior parts.

 

 

DIF:    Recall             REF:   p. 3                OBJ:   1

TOP:   CDA: General Chairside, I. A. Demonstrate understanding of basic oral and dental anatomy, physiology, and development

MSC:  NBDHE, Scientific Basis for Dental Hygiene Practice, 1.1 Anatomy

 

  1. The dental professional MUST have a thorough understanding of head and neck anatomy when performing patient examination procedures, both extraoral and intraoral. Certain terms can be used to give information about the depth of a structure in relationship to the surface of the body.
a. Both the statement and the reason are correct and related.
b. Both the statement and the reason are correct but NOT related.
c. The statement is correct, but the reason is NOT.
d. The statement is NOT correct, but the reason is correct.
e. NEITHER the statement NOR the reason is correct.

 

 

ANS:  A

 

  Feedback
A Both the statement and the reason are correct and related. The dental professional MUST have a thorough understanding of head and neck anatomy when performing patient examination procedures, both extraoral and intraoral. Certain terms can be used to give information about the depth of a structure in relationship to the surface of the body.
B Both the statement and the reason are correct and related. The dental professional MUST have a thorough understanding of head and neck anatomy when performing patient examination procedures, both extraoral and intraoral. Certain terms can be used to give information about the depth of a structure in relationship to the surface of the body.
C Both the statement and the reason are correct and related. The dental professional MUST have a thorough understanding of head and neck anatomy when performing patient examination procedures, both extraoral and intraoral. Certain terms can be used to give information about the depth of a structure in relationship to the surface of the body.
D Both the statement and the reason are correct and related. The dental professional MUST have a thorough understanding of head and neck anatomy when performing patient examination procedures, both extraoral and intraoral. Certain terms can be used to give information about the depth of a structure in relationship to the surface of the body.
E Both the statement and the reason are correct and related. The dental professional MUST have a thorough understanding of head and neck anatomy when performing patient examination procedures, both extraoral and intraoral. Certain terms can be used to give information about the depth of a structure in relationship to the surface of the body.

 

 

DIF:    Comprehension                              REF:   p. 3                OBJ:   2

TOP:   CDA: General Chairside, I. B. Preliminary Physical Examination | CDA: General Chairside, II. C. Describe how to perform and/or assist with intraoral procedures

MSC:  NBDHE, Provision of Clinical Dental Hygiene Services, 1.0 Assessing Patient Characteristics

 

  1. The face is on the anterior side of the head, and the neck is superior and posterior to the face.
a. Both statements are true.
b. Both statements are false.
c. The first statement is true; the second is false.
d. The first statement is false; the second is true.

 

 

ANS:  C

 

  Feedback
A The first statement is true; the second is false. The face is on the anterior side of the head, and the neck is inferior and posterior to the face. The hair is superior to the face as well.
B The first statement is true; the second is false. The face is on the anterior side of the head, and the neck is inferior and posterior to the face. The hair is superior to the face as well.
C The first statement is true; the second is false. The face is on the anterior side of the head, and the neck is inferior and posterior to the face. The hair is superior to the face as well.
D The first statement is true; the second is false. The face is on the anterior side of the head, and the neck is inferior and posterior to the face. The hair is superior to the face as well.

 

 

DIF:    Comprehension                              REF:   p. 3                OBJ:   2

TOP:   CDA: General Chairside, I. A. Demonstrate understanding of basic oral and dental anatomy, physiology, and development

MSC:  NBDHE, Scientific Basis for Dental Hygiene Practice, 1.1.1 Head and Neck Anatomy

 

MULTIPLE RESPONSE

 

  1. From the following list of anatomic terms, select which terms are DIRECTLY associated with the planes that can be noted with the body. (Select all that apply.)
a. Medial or distal
b. Median or sagittal
c. Frontal or horizontal
d. Lateral or proximal

 

 

ANS:  B, C

 

  Feedback
Correct Median, sagittal, frontal, and horizontal actually are planes, so they are DIRECTLY associated with planes that can be noted with the body.
Incorrect Medial, distal, lateral, and proximal are descriptions for parts of the body in relationship to the planes, so they are NOT DIRECTLY associated with the planes themselves.

 

 

DIF:    Recall             REF:   p. 4, Figure 1-4                               OBJ:   1

TOP:   CDA: General Chairside, I. A. Demonstrate understanding of basic oral and dental anatomy, physiology, and development

MSC:  NBDHE, Scientific Basis for Dental Hygiene Practice, 1.1 Anatomy

 

  1. From the following list of anatomic terms, select which terms can be used to give information about the depth of a structure in relationship to the surface of the body. (Select all that apply.)
a. Medial
b. Superficial
c. Deep
d. External
e. Internal

 

 

ANS:  B, C

 

  Feedback
Correct Superficial and deep are both used to give information about the depth of a structure in relationship to the surface of the body.
Incorrect Medial is closer to the median plane (and lateral is farther away from the median plane). Internal is on the inner side of the wall of a hollow structure, and external is on the outer side of the wall of a hollow structure. Both do NOT give information about the depth of a structure in relationship to the surface of the body.

 

 

DIF:    Recall             REF:   p. 3                OBJ:   1

TOP:   CDA: General Chairside, I. A. Demonstrate understanding of basic oral and dental anatomy, physiology, and development

MSC:  NBDHE, Scientific Basis for Dental Hygiene Practice, 1.1 Anatomy

 

  1. From the following list of anatomic terms, select which terms are DIRECTLY related to the median plane of the body. (Select all that apply.)
a. Medial
b. Lateral
c. Ipsilateral
d. Contralateral

 

 

ANS:  A, B

 

  Feedback
Correct Medial is closer to the median plane, and lateral is farther away from the median plane, so they both are DIRECTLY related to the median plane.
Incorrect Ipsilateral is on the same side of the body, and contralateral is on the opposite side of the body, so they both are NOT DIRECTLY related to the median plane.

 

 

DIF:    Recall             REF:   p. 3                OBJ:   1

TOP:   CDA: General Chairside, I. A. Demonstrate understanding of basic oral and dental anatomy, physiology, and development

MSC:  NBDHE, Scientific Basis for Dental Hygiene Practice, 1.1 Anatomy

 

  1. From the following list of anatomic terms, select which terms are DIRECTLY related to either an inner OR an outer side of a wall of a hollow organ. (Select all that apply.)
a. Superficial
b. Deep
c. Internal
d. External

 

 

ANS:  C, D

 

  Feedback
Correct Internal is on the inner side of the wall of a hollow structure, and external is on the outer side of the wall of a hollow structure; both are DIRECTLY related to either an inner OR an outer side of a wall of a hollow organ.
Incorrect Superficial and deep are both used to give information about the depth of a structure in relationship to the surface of the body; both are NOT DIRECTLY related to either an inner OR an outer side of a wall of a hollow organ.

 

 

DIF:    Recall             REF:   p. 3                OBJ:   1

TOP:   CDA: General Chairside, I. A. Demonstrate understanding of basic oral and dental anatomy, physiology, and development

MSC:  NBDHE, Scientific Basis for Dental Hygiene Practice, 1.1 Anatomy

 

  1. From the following list of anatomic terms, select which terms are related to a structure being either on the same side of the body OR on the opposite side of the body. (Select all that apply.)
a. Medial
b. Lateral
c. Ipsilateral
d. Contralateral

 

 

ANS:  C, D

 

  Feedback
Correct Ipsilateral is on the same side of the body, and contralateral is on the opposite side of the body; both are related to a structure being either on the same side of the body OR on the opposite side of the body.
Incorrect Medial is closer to the median plane, and lateral is farther away from the median plane; both are NOT related to a structure being either on the same side of the body OR on the opposite side of the body.

 

 

DIF:    Recall             REF:   p. 3                OBJ:   1

TOP:   CDA: General Chairside, I. A. Demonstrate understanding of basic oral and dental anatomy, physiology, and development

MSC:  NBDHE, Scientific Basis for Dental Hygiene Practice, 1.1 Anatomy

 

  1. Which of the following statements listed are CORRECT concerning the body in anatomic position? (Select all that apply.)
a. The body can be standing erect.
b. The patient’s head and neck when sitting upright in a dental chair.
c. The arms are at the sides with the palms directed forward.
d. The toes directed forward and the eyes looking forward.

 

 

ANS:  A, B, C, D

In anatomic position, the body can be standing erect. The arms are at the sides with the palms and toes directed forward and the eyes looking forward. This position is assumed with respect to the position of the patient’s head and neck when sitting upright in a dental chair.

 

DIF:    Comprehension                              REF:   p. 2                OBJ:   2

TOP:   CDA: General Chairside, I. B. Preliminary Physical Examination

MSC:  NBDHE, Scientific Basis for Dental Hygiene Practice, 1.0 Assessing Patient Characteristics

 

  1. Which of the following definitions of anatomic terms listed are CORRECT? (Select all that apply.)
a. An area that faces away from the head and toward from the feet is its superior part.
b. The ventral part is directed toward the posterior.
c. An area closer to the median plane is considered to be proximal.
d. An area closer to the median plane of the body or structure is considered medial.

 

 

ANS:  C, D

 

  Feedback
Correct An area closer to the median plane is considered to be proximal. An area closer to the median plane of the body or structure is considered medial.
Incorrect An area that faces away from the head and toward the feet is its inferior part and NOT its superior part that faces toward the head and away from the feet. The dorsal part is directed toward the posterior and NOT toward the anterior like the ventral part.

 

 

DIF:    Recall             REF:   p. 3                OBJ:   1

TOP:   CDA: General Chairside, I. A. Demonstrate understanding of basic oral and dental anatomy, physiology, and development

MSC:  NBDHE, Scientific Basis for Dental Hygiene Practice, 1.1 Anatomy

 

MATCHING

 

From the following list of anatomic terms, match those terms with their CORRECT definitions.

a. Area that is farther away from the median plane of the body or structure.
b. Area that is closer to the median plane of the body or structure.
c. Structure on the opposite side of the body.
d. Structure on the same side of the body.

 

 

  1. Medial

 

  1. Lateral

 

  1. Ipsilateral

 

  1. Contralateral

 

  1. ANS:  B                    DIF:    Recall            REF:   p. 3                OBJ:   1

TOP:   CDA: General Chairside, I. A. Demonstrate understanding of basic oral and dental anatomy, physiology, and development

MSC:  NBDHE, Scientific Basis for Dental Hygiene Practice, 1.1 Anatomy

 

  1. ANS:  A                    DIF:    Recall            REF:   p. 3                OBJ:   1

TOP:   CDA: General Chairside, I. A. Demonstrate understanding of basic oral and dental anatomy, physiology, and development

MSC:  NBDHE, Scientific Basis for Dental Hygiene Practice, 1.1 Anatomy

 

  1. ANS:  D                    DIF:    Recall            REF:   p. 3                OBJ:   1

TOP:   CDA: General Chairside, I. A. Demonstrate understanding of basic oral and dental anatomy, physiology, and development

MSC:  NBDHE, Scientific Basis for Dental Hygiene Practice, 1.1 Anatomy

 

  1. ANS:  C                    DIF:    Recall            REF:   p. 3                OBJ:   1

TOP:   CDA: General Chairside, I. A. Demonstrate understanding of basic oral and dental anatomy, physiology, and development

MSC:  NBDHE, Scientific Basis for Dental Hygiene Practice, 1.1 Anatomy

 

From the following list of anatomic terms, match those terms with their CORRECT alternative terms.

a. Coronal plane
b. Midsagittal plane
c. Horizontal section
d. Coronal section

 

 

  1. Median plane

 

  1. Frontal plane

 

  1. Transverse section

 

  1. Frontal section

 

  1. ANS:  B                    DIF:    Recall            REF:   p. 3                OBJ:   1

TOP:   CDA: General Chairside, I. A. Demonstrate understanding of basic oral and dental anatomy, physiology, and development

MSC:  NBDHE, Scientific Basis for Dental Hygiene Practice, 1.1 Anatomy

 

  1. ANS:  A                    DIF:    Recall            REF:   p. 3                OBJ:   1

TOP:   CDA: General Chairside, I. A. Demonstrate understanding of basic oral and dental anatomy, physiology, and development

MSC:  NBDHE, Scientific Basis for Dental Hygiene Practice, 1.1 Anatomy

 

  1. ANS:  C                    DIF:    Recall            REF:   p. 3                OBJ:   1

TOP:   CDA: General Chairside, I. A. Demonstrate understanding of basic oral and dental anatomy, physiology, and development

MSC:  NBDHE, Scientific Basis for Dental Hygiene Practice, 1.1 Anatomy

 

  1. ANS:  D                    DIF:    Recall            REF:   p. 3                OBJ:   1

TOP:   CDA: General Chairside, I. A. Demonstrate understanding of basic oral and dental anatomy, physiology, and development

MSC:  NBDHE, Scientific Basis for Dental Hygiene Practice, 1.1 Anatomy

 

OTHER

 

  1. Place the following in the CORRECT order suggested when studying diagrams or associated photographs of anatomic structures, especially those of dissections.
  2. Note any familiar structures.
  3. Note any overall descriptions.
  4. Look to areas highlighted.

 

ANS:

B, A, C

 

  Feedback
Correct Order It is important to keep in mind when studying diagrams or associated photographs of anatomic structures, especially those of dissections, to first note any overall descriptions (e.g., view, section) as well as any nearby directional pointers. Then note any familiar structures (e.g., apex of tongue or nose, maxilla or mandible) to allow for basic orientation. Next look to the areas highlighted, if noted and, of course, those structures that are labeled.
Incorrect This process in the correct order will help overall in the study of the head and neck.

 

 

DIF:    Application    REF:   p. 3                OBJ:   2

TOP:   CDA: General Chairside, I. A. Demonstrate understanding of basic oral and dental anatomy, physiology, and development

MSC:  NBDHE, Scientific Basis for Dental Hygiene Practice, 1.1 Anatomy

Chapter 03: Skeletal System

Fehrenbach: Illustrated Anatomy of the Head and Neck, 5th Edition

 

MULTIPLE CHOICE

 

  1. Which of the following bony features listed does NOT serve as an opening in bone?
a. Foramen
b. Canal
c. Sulcus
d. Fissure

 

 

ANS:  C

 

  Feedback
A A foramen is a short windowlike opening in bone.
B A canal is a tubelike opening in bone.
C A sulcus is a shallow depression or groove on bony surface and NOT an opening in bone.
D A fissure is a narrow cleftlike opening in bone.

 

 

DIF:    Recall             REF:   p. 33              OBJ:   1 | 2

TOP:   CDA: General Chairside, I. A. Demonstrate understanding of basic oral and dental anatomy, physiology, and development

MSC:  NBDHE, Scientific Basis for Dental Hygiene Practice, 1.1.1 Head and Neck Anatomy

 

  1. Which of the following bones listed is the ONLY movable bone of the skull?
a. Hyoid bone
b. Mandible
c. Palatine
d. Vomer

 

 

ANS:  B

 

  Feedback
A Even though the hyoid bone is movable and has no bony articulations, it is a bone located in the neck and NOT the skull.
B The mandible is the only skull bone that moves; it moves at the temporomandibular joint. Within this joint, the mandibular condyle moves within the articular fossa of the temporal bone.
C The palatine bone may be a skull bone, but it does NOT move.
D The vomer may be a skull bone, but it does NOT move.

 

 

DIF:    Recall             REF:   p. 33              OBJ:   3

TOP:   CDA: General Chairside, I. A. Demonstrate understanding of basic oral and dental anatomy, physiology, and development

MSC:  NBDHE, Scientific Basis for Dental Hygiene Practice, 1.1.1 Head and Neck Anatomy

 

  1. The squamosal suture is BEST observed from which view of the skull?
a. Anterior view
b. Inferior view
c. Lateral view
d. Superior view

 

 

ANS:  C

 

  Feedback
A It is difficult to see the squamosal suture on the lateral skull surface from an anterior view.
B It is difficult to see the squamosal suture on the lateral skull surface from an inferior view.
C The squamosal suture is the suture between the parietal bones and temporal bones on each side of the skull. This suture is BEST viewed from the lateral view.
D It is difficult to see the squamosal suture on the lateral skull surface from a superior view.

 

 

DIF:    Comprehension                              REF:   p. 40              OBJ:   2

TOP:   CDA: General Chairside, I. A. Demonstrate understanding of basic oral and dental anatomy, physiology, and development

MSC:  NBDHE, Scientific Basis for Dental Hygiene Practice, 1.1.1 Head and Neck Anatomy

 

  1. Which of the following openings within the orbit connects the orbit with the cranial cavity?
a. Cribriform plate
b. Infraorbital foramen
c. Inferior orbital fissure
d. Superior orbital fissure

 

 

ANS:  D

 

  Feedback
A The cribriform plate is a passageway for olfactory nerves from the nasal cavity to the brain.
B The infraorbital foramen is located inferior to the orbit on the facial surface of the maxilla.
C The inferior orbital fissure connects the orbit with both the infratemporal and pterygopalatine fossae and NOT the cranial cavity.
D The superior orbital fissure is a slitlike opening between the lesser and greater wings of the sphenoid bone and serves as a passageway for blood vessels and nerves from the cranial cavity into the orbit, thus connecting the two.

 

 

DIF:    Recall             REF:   pp. 46-47       OBJ:   2

TOP:   CDA: General Chairside, I. A. Demonstrate understanding of basic oral and dental anatomy, physiology, and development

MSC:  NBDHE, Scientific Basis for Dental Hygiene Practice, 1.1.1 Head and Neck Anatomy

 

  1. After the seventh cranial nerve travels through the petrous part of the temporal bone, through which opening does it exit onto the face?
a. External auditory meatus
b. Jugular notch
c. Foramen spinosum
d. Stylomastoid foramen

 

 

ANS:  D

 

  Feedback
A The external acoustic meatus is the short external canal that leads to the tympanic cavity.
B The jugular notch, formed by the articulation of temporal and occipital bones, is associated with the jugular vein and the ninth, tenth, and eleventh cranial nerves.
C The foramen spinosum is more posterior and is associated with the middle meningeal artery.
D The seventh cranial nerve enters the temporal bone through the internal acoustic meatus, travels within the temporal bone, and exits through the stylomastoid foramen onto the face.

 

 

DIF:    Recall             REF:   p. 46              OBJ:   2

TOP:   CDA: General Chairside, I. A. Demonstrate understanding of basic oral and dental anatomy, physiology, and development

MSC:  NBDHE, Scientific Basis for Dental Hygiene Practice, 1.1.1 Head and Neck Anatomy

 

  1. Which of the following external foramina can ONLY be observed from an inferior view of the skull?
a. Hypoglossal canal
b. Foramen ovale
c. Foramen spinosum
d. Stylomastoid foramen

 

 

ANS:  D

 

  Feedback
A The hypoglossal canal can be viewed from both inferior and superior aspects of the skull.
B The foramen ovale can be viewed from both inferior and superior aspects of the skull.
C The foramen spinosum can be viewed from both inferior and superior aspects of the skull.
D The stylomastoid foramen is NOT visible from a superior view of the skull and can ONLY be observed from an inferior view of the skull. It is located between the mastoid process and the styloid process on the inferior surface of the petrous part of the temporal bone.

 

 

DIF:    Comprehension                              REF:   p. 46              OBJ:   2

TOP:   CDA: General Chairside, I. A. Demonstrate understanding of basic oral and dental anatomy, physiology, and development

MSC:  NBDHE, Scientific Basis for Dental Hygiene Practice, 1.1.1 Head and Neck Anatomy

 

  1. Through which of the following openings in the skull does the twelfth cranial nerve pass?
a. Internal acoustic meatus
b. Foramen rotundum
c. Foramen spinosum
d. Hypoglossal canal

 

 

ANS:  D

 

  Feedback
A The internal acoustic meatus is located on the superior internal surface of the temporal bone and is associated with both the seventh and eighth cranial nerves.
B The foramen rotundum is located within the sphenoid bone and is associated with the maxillary nerve or second division of the fifth cranial nerve.
C The foramen spinosum is located within the sphenoid bone and is associated with the middle meningeal artery.
D The twelfth cranial nerve passes through the hypoglossal canal, an opening in the skull that is located in the occipital bone on each side of the foramen magnum.

 

 

DIF:    Recall             REF:   p. 47              OBJ:   2

TOP:   CDA: General Chairside, I. A. Demonstrate understanding of basic oral and dental anatomy, physiology, and development

MSC:  NBDHE, Scientific Basis for Dental Hygiene Practice, 1.1.1 Head and Neck Anatomy

 

  1. Why is the pterygoid process of the sphenoid bone an important feature of the skull to the dental professionals?
a. Serves as an attachment for the muscles of mastication
b. Serves as an attachment for muscles involved in swallowing
c. Serves as a landmark observed on maxillary posterior periapical radiographs
d. Serves as a landmark observed on mandibular posterior periapical radiographs

 

 

ANS:  A

 

  Feedback
A The pterygoid process is an attachment for both the lateral and medial pterygoid muscles, which are two muscles of mastication.
B The pterygoid process does NOT provide attachment for the muscles involved in swallowing.
C The pterygoid process is NOT a landmark usually observed on maxillary periapical radiographs.
D The pterygoid process is NOT a landmark observed on mandibular periapical radiographs.

 

 

DIF:    Application    REF:   p. 53              OBJ:   2

TOP:   CDA: General Chairside, I. A. Demonstrate understanding of basic oral and dental anatomy, physiology, and development

MSC:  NBDHE, Scientific Basis for Dental Hygiene Practice, 1.1.1 Head and Neck Anatomy | NBDHE, Provision of Clinical Dental Hygiene Services, 3.0 Planning and Managing Dental Hygiene Care

 

  1. Through which of the following bony landmarks is the sense of smell carried by olfactory nerves?
a. Crista galli of the ethmoid bone
b. Frontal sinuses of the frontal bone
c. Cribriform plate of the ethmoid bone
d. Perpendicular plate of the ethmoid bone

 

 

ANS:  C

 

  Feedback
A The crista galli is the vertical projection of the ethmoid bone into the cranial cavity. It is an area of attachment for the meninges.
B The frontal sinuses of the frontal bone do NOT have openings for passage of the olfactory nerves to the brain.
C The cribriform plate is the superior horizontal part of the ethmoid bone that is perforated for passage of olfactory nerves for the sense of smell.
D The perpendicular plate of the ethmoid bone forms part of the nasal septum.

 

 

DIF:    Recall             REF:   p. 57              OBJ:   2

TOP:   CDA: General Chairside, I. A. Demonstrate understanding of basic oral and dental anatomy, physiology, and development

MSC:  NBDHE, Scientific Basis for Dental Hygiene Practice, 1.1.1 Head and Neck Anatomy

 

  1. Which of the following bony features increases the surface area within the nasal cavity?
a. Perpendicular plate of the ethmoid bone
b. Inferior nasal conchae
c. Lacrimal bones
d. Nasal bones

 

 

ANS:  B

 

  Feedback
A The vertical plate is straight and serves as part of the nasal septum.
B The scroll-like shape of the inferior nasal conchae assists in increasing the surface area since it is covered with mucous membranes.
C The lacrimal bones are small, fragile bones that form a part of the anterior medial wall of the orbit.
D The nasal bones form the bridge of the nose.

 

 

DIF:    Recall             REF:   p. 40              OBJ:   2

TOP:   CDA: General Chairside, I. A. Demonstrate understanding of basic oral and dental anatomy, physiology, and development

MSC:  NBDHE, Scientific Basis for Dental Hygiene Practice, 1.1.1 Head and Neck Anatomy

 

  1. Which of the following skull bones are considered to be paired cranial bones?
a. Nasal bones
b. Temporal bones
c. Lacrimal bones
d. Zygomatic bones

 

 

ANS:  B

 

  Feedback
A The nasal bones are paired facial bones but NOT cranial bones.
B The temporal bones are paired cranial bones.
C The lacrimal bones are paired facial bones but NOT cranial bones.
D The zygomatic bones are paired facial bones but NOT cranial bones.

 

 

DIF:    Recall             REF:   p. 47              OBJ:   2

TOP:   CDA: General Chairside, I. A. Demonstrate understanding of basic oral and dental anatomy, physiology, and development

MSC:  NBDHE, Scientific Basis for Dental Hygiene Practice, 1.1.1 Head and Neck Anatomy

 

  1. Through which bony opening do BOTH the right and left nasopalatine nerves exit onto the palate?
a. Posterior superior alveolar foramina
b. Incisive foramen
c. Greater palatine foramina
d. Lesser palatine foramina

 

 

ANS:  B

 

  Feedback
A The posterior superior alveolar foramina are passageways for the posterior superior alveolar nerves and blood vessels and NOT the nasopalatine nerves.
B Both the right and left nasopalatine nerves and blood vessels travel from the nasal cavity to the anterior palate through the incisive foramen.
C The greater palatine foramina are located in the posterolateral region of the palatine bones and are NOT passageways for the nasopalatine nerves and blood vessels but for the greater palatine nerve and blood vessels.
D The lesser palatine foramina are located in the palatine bones and are NOT passageways for the nasopalatine nerves nor blood vessels but for the lesser palatine nerve and blood vessels.

 

 

DIF:    Recall             REF:   p. 64              OBJ:   2

TOP:   CDA: General Chairside, I. A. Demonstrate understanding of basic oral and dental anatomy, physiology, and development

MSC:  NBDHE, Scientific Basis for Dental Hygiene Practice, 1.1.1 Head and Neck Anatomy

 

  1. Which of the following landmarks needs to be noted during the administration of a local anesthetic agent to the maxillary posterior teeth?
a. Infraorbital foramen
b. Retromolar pad
c. Maxillary tuberosity
d. Zygomatic process of the maxilla

 

 

ANS:  C

 

  Feedback
A The infraorbital foramen is located on the facial surface of the maxilla and is NOT a passageway for nerves to the maxillary posterior teeth.
B The retromolar pad is located on the mandible posterior to the mandibular molars and is NOT used as a landmark for administration of maxillary local anesthesia.
C The posterior superior alveolar foramina serve as openings for the passage of the posterior superior alveolar nerve and blood vessels. These foramina are posterosuperior and medial to the maxillary tuberosity and perforate the infratemporal surface of the maxilla multiple times. They need to be noted during the administration of a local anesthetic agent to the maxillary posterior teeth.
D The zygomatic process of the maxilla does NOT serve as a landmark for the administration of local anesthesia to maxillary posterior teeth.

 

 

DIF:    Comprehension                              REF:   p. 63              OBJ:   3

TOP:   CDA: General Chairside, I. A. Demonstrate understanding of basic oral and dental anatomy, physiology, and development

MSC:  NBDHE, Scientific Basis for Dental Hygiene Practice, 1.1.2 Dental Anatomy

 

  1. Which of the following sutures of the skull is an immovable articulation between the occipital bone and the parietal bones?
a. Coronal suture
b. Lambdoidal suture
c. Sagittal suture
d. Squamosal suture

 

 

ANS:  B

 

  Feedback
A The coronal suture is an immovable articulation between the frontal bone and the parietal bones.
B The lambdoidal suture is an immovable articulation between the occipital bone and the parietal bones meet.
C The sagittal suture is an immovable articulation between the two parietal bones.
D The squamosal suture is an immovable articulation between the temporal bones and parietal bones on each side.

 

 

DIF:    Recall             REF:   p. 40              OBJ:   2

TOP:   CDA: General Chairside, I. A. Demonstrate understanding of basic oral and dental anatomy, physiology, and development

MSC:  NBDHE, Scientific Basis for Dental Hygiene Practice, 1.1.1 Head and Neck Anatomy

 

  1. Which of the following bony landmarks is a depression located between the coronoid process and the mandibular ramus?
a. Coronoid notch
b. Mandibular notch
c. Mandibular foramen
d. Submandibular fossa

 

 

ANS:  B

 

  Feedback
A The coronoid notch is a depression located on the anterior border of the mandibular ramus inferior to the coronoid process.
B The depression between the coronoid process and the mandibular ramus is the mandibular notch.
C The mandibular foramen is located on the medial surface of the mandibular ramus.
D The submandibular fossa is a depression located inferior to the mylohyoid line or ridge on the medial surface of the body of the mandible.

 

 

DIF:    Recall             REF:   p. 68              OBJ:   2

TOP:   CDA: General Chairside, I. A. Demonstrate understanding of basic oral and dental anatomy, physiology, and development

MSC:  NBDHE, Scientific Basis for Dental Hygiene Practice, 1.1.1 Head and Neck Anatomy

 

  1. Which of the following paranasal sinuses can be palpated during an extraoral examination by a clinician?
a. Frontal and sphenoidal sinuses
b. Sphenoidal and ethmoidal sinuses
c. Ethmoidal and maxillary sinuses
d. Maxillary and frontal sinuses

 

 

ANS:  D

 

  Feedback
A The frontal sinuses can be palpated during an extraoral examination, but the sphenoidal sinuses CANNOT be palpated as part of the extraoral examination due to their location within the sphenoid bone.
B NEITHER the sphenoidal NOR ethmoidal sinuses can be palpated during an extraoral examination due to their location within their respective bones.
C The ethmoidal sinuses CANNOT be palpated during the extraoral examination due to their location within the ethmoid bone.
D Both the maxillary and frontal sinuses can be palpated during an extraoral examination.

 

 

DIF:    Application    REF:   p. 71              OBJ:   3

TOP:   CDA: General Chairside, I. A. Demonstrate understanding of basic oral and dental anatomy, physiology, and development | CDA: General Chairside, I. B. Preliminary Physical Examination | CDA: General Chairside, II. C. Describe how to perform and/or assist with intraoral procedures

MSC:  NBDHE, Scientific Basis for Dental Hygiene Practice, 1.1.1 Head and Neck Anatomy | NBDHE, Provision of Clinical Dental Hygiene Services, 3.0 Planning and Managing Dental Hygiene Care

 

  1. How does the mandibular condyle move in relationship to the temporal bone?
a. Articular eminence
b. Coronoid notch
c. Articular fossa
d. Mandibular fossa

 

 

ANS:  C

 

  Feedback
A The mandibular condyle does NOT move within the articular eminence of the temporal bone.
B The coronoid notch is part of the mandible.
C The articular fossa of the temporal bone is the articulation area for movement of the mandibular condyle as part of the temporomandibular joint.
D The mandibular notch is part of the mandible.

 

 

DIF:    Comprehension                              REF:   p. 71              OBJ:   3

TOP:   CDA: General Chairside, I. A. Demonstrate understanding of basic oral and dental anatomy, physiology, and development

MSC:  NBDHE, Scientific Basis for Dental Hygiene Practice, 1.1.1 Head and Neck Anatomy

 

  1. When viewing the medial surface of the mandible, which of the following bony landmarks CANNOT be observed?
a. Internal oblique ridge
b. Genial tubercles
c. Mandibular foramen
d. Mental foramen

 

 

ANS:  D

 

  Feedback
A The internal oblique ridge can be observed on the medial surface of the mandible.
B The genial tubercles can be observed on the medial surface of the mandible.
C The mandibular foramen can be observed on the medial surface of the mandibular ramus.
D When viewing the medial surface of the mandible, ALL of the other structures can be observed. The mental foramen is located on the lateral surface of the mandible and CANNOT be viewed on the medial surface of the mandible.

 

 

DIF:    Comprehension                              REF:   p. 68              OBJ:   3

TOP:   CDA: General Chairside, I. A. Demonstrate understanding of basic oral and dental anatomy, physiology, and development

MSC:  NBDHE, Scientific Basis for Dental Hygiene Practice, 1.1.1 Head and Neck Anatomy

 

  1. Which of the following landmarks is the MOST inferiorly located on the mandible?
a. Lingula
b. Mylohyoid line
c. Submandibular fossa
d. Retromolar triangle

 

 

ANS:  C

 

  Feedback
A The lingula is located on the medial surface of the mandibular ramus, which is superior to the body of the mandible.
B The mylohyoid line is located on the medial surface of the body of the mandible, which is superior to the submandibular fossa.
C The submandibular fossa is located on the medial surface of the mandible and is inferior to the other landmarks listed: the lingula, mylohyoid line, and retromolar triangle, so overall it is the most inferiorly located mandibular landmark.
D The retromolar triangle is located on the posterior part of the alveolar ridge of the mandible, which is located superior to the submandibular fossa.

 

 

DIF:    Comprehension                              REF:   p. 70              OBJ:   3

TOP:   CDA: General Chairside, I. A. Demonstrate understanding of basic oral and dental anatomy, physiology, and development

MSC:  NBDHE, Scientific Basis for Dental Hygiene Practice, 1.1.1 Head and Neck Anatomy

 

  1. Which of the following bony landmarks is formed by the vertical plates of the palatine bones?
a. Nasal septum
b. Posterior hard palate
c. Lateral walls of the nasal cavity
d. Superior wall of the orbit

 

 

ANS:  C

 

  Feedback
A The nasal septum is located in the midline of the nasal cavity, and the palatine bones are NOT located there.
B The posterior hard palate is formed by the horizontal plates of the palatine bones.
C The vertical plates of the palatine bones form the posterior lateral walls of the nasal cavity.
D The palatine bones are NOT located superior to the orbit and therefore do NOT form the superior orbital wall.

 

 

DIF:    Recall             REF:   p. 60              OBJ:   2

TOP:   CDA: General Chairside, I. A. Demonstrate understanding of basic oral and dental anatomy, physiology, and development

MSC:  NBDHE, Scientific Basis for Dental Hygiene Practice, 1.1.1 Head and Neck Anatomy

 

  1. Which of the following processes forms the lateral part of the infraorbital rim?
a. Temporal process of the zygomatic bone
b. Maxillary process of the zygomatic bone
c. Frontal process of the maxilla
d. Alveolar process of the maxilla

 

 

ANS:  B

 

  Feedback
A The temporal process of the zygomatic bone articulates with a part of the temporal bone and forms the zygomatic arch.
B The maxillary process of the zygomatic bone is the part that articulates with the maxilla and forms the lateral part of the infraorbital rim.
C The frontal process of the maxilla forms the medial infraorbital rim.
D The alveolar process of the maxilla is the part that surrounds the teeth by way of the alveoli or tooth sockets.

 

 

DIF:    Recall             REF:   pp. 59-60       OBJ:   3

TOP:   CDA: General Chairside, I. A. Demonstrate understanding of basic oral and dental anatomy, physiology, and development

MSC:  NBDHE, Scientific Basis for Dental Hygiene Practice, 1.1.1 Head and Neck Anatomy

 

  1. Where is the pterygoid process of the skull located?
a. Inferior to the greater wing of the sphenoid bone
b. Posterior to the greater wing of the sphenoid bone
c. Anterior to the greater wing of the sphenoid bone
d. Anterior to the body of the sphenoid bone

 

 

ANS:  A

 

  Feedback
A The pterygoid process is located inferior to the greater wing of the sphenoid bone.
B The pterygoid process is located inferior to the greater wing of the sphenoid bone.
C The pterygoid process is located inferior to the greater wing of the sphenoid bone.
D The pterygoid process is located inferior to the greater wing of the sphenoid bone.

 

 

DIF:    Recall             REF:   p. 53              OBJ:   2

TOP:   CDA: General Chairside, I. A. Demonstrate understanding of basic oral and dental anatomy, physiology, and development

MSC:  NBDHE, Scientific Basis for Dental Hygiene Practice, 1.1.1 Head and Neck Anatomy

 

  1. The pterygopalatine fossa communicates with the middle cranial fossa via the
a. foramen rotundum.
b. superior orbital fissure.
c. foramen ovale.
d. inferior orbital fissure.

 

 

ANS:  A

 

  Feedback
A Pterygopalatine fossa communicates with the middle cranial fossa via the foramen rotundum; more specifically, the pterygoid canal.
B Lateral to the optic canal is the curved and slitlike superior orbital fissure, between the greater and lesser wings of the sphenoid bone. Similar to the optic canal, the superior orbital fissure connects the orbit with the cranial cavity. The third cranial or oculomotor nerve, the fourth cranial or trochlear nerve, the sixth cranial or abducens nerve, and the ophthalmic nerve or first division from fifth cranial or trigeminal nerve and vein travel through this fissure.
C The larger anterior oval opening on the sphenoid bone is the foramen ovale for the mandibular nerve or third division of the fifth cranial or trigeminal nerve.
D The inferior orbital fissure can also be noted between the greater wing of the sphenoid bone and the maxilla. The inferior orbital fissure connects the orbit with the infratemporal and pterygopalatine fossae. The infraorbital and zygomatic nerves, branches of the maxillary nerve, and infraorbital artery enter the orbit through this fissure. The inferior ophthalmic vein travels through this fissure to join the pterygoid plexus of veins.

 

 

DIF:    Recall             REF:   p. 76              OBJ:   2

TOP:   CDA: General Chairside, I. A. Demonstrate understanding of basic oral and dental anatomy, physiology, and development

MSC:  NBDHE, Scientific Basis for Dental Hygiene Practice, 1.1.1 Head and Neck Anatomy

 

  1. . The ______ is resorbed with tooth loss, and this loss can be noted on patients radiographically.
a. body of the maxillae
b. body of the mandible
c. base of the mandible
d. alveolar process of the mandible

 

 

ANS:  D

 

  Feedback
A The body of the maxillae is NOT resorbed with tooth loss.
B The body or base of the mandible is NOT resorbed with tooth loss.
C The base or body of the mandible is NOT resorbed with tooth loss.
D The alveolar process of the mandible can be resorbed with tooth loss and can be noted on patients to some extent radiographically.

 

 

DIF:    Application    REF:   p. 65              OBJ:   4

TOP:   CDA: General Chairside, I. A. Demonstrate understanding of basic oral and dental anatomy, physiology, and development | CDA: General Chairside, II. C. Describe how to perform and/or assist with intraoral procedures | CDA: General Chairside, V. A. Oral Health Information

MSC:  NBDHE, Scientific Basis for Dental Hygiene Practice, 1.1.2 Dental Anatomy | NBDHE, Scientific Basis for Dental Hygiene Practice, 5.0 Pathology | NBDHE, Provision of Clinical Dental Hygiene Services, 3.0 Planning and Managing Dental Hygiene Care

 

  1. The differences in alveolar process density determine the easiest and MOST clinically effective region for bony fracture used during tooth extraction, if needed. Thus the maxillary teeth are surgically BEST removed by fracturing the thinner facial cortical plate rather than the thicker lingual cortical plate.
a. Both the statement and reason are correct and related.
b. Both the statement and reason are correct but NOT related.
c. The statement is correct, but the reason is NOT.
d. The statement is NOT correct, but the reason is correct.
e. NEITHER the statement NOR the reason is correct.

 

 

ANS:  A

 

  Feedback
A Both the statement and reason are correct and related. The differences in alveolar process density determine the most clinically effective region for bony fracture used during tooth extraction. Thus the maxillary teeth are surgically BEST removed by fracturing the thinner facial cortical plate rather than the thicker lingual cortical plate, if needed.
B Both the statement and reason are correct and related. The differences in alveolar process density determine the most clinically effective region for bony fracture used during tooth extraction. Thus the maxillary teeth are surgically BEST removed by fracturing the thinner facial cortical plate rather than the thicker lingual cortical plate, if needed.
C Both the statement and reason are correct and related. The differences in alveolar process density determine the most clinically effective region for bony fracture used during tooth extraction. Thus the maxillary teeth are surgically BEST removed by fracturing the thinner facial cortical plate rather than the thicker lingual cortical plate, if needed.
D Both the statement and reason are correct and related. The differences in alveolar process density determine the most clinically effective region for bony fracture used during tooth extraction. Thus the maxillary teeth are surgically BEST removed by fracturing the thinner facial cortical plate rather than the thicker lingual cortical plate, if needed.
E Both the statement and reason are correct and related. The differences in alveolar process density determine the most clinically effective region for bony fracture used during tooth extraction. Thus the maxillary teeth are surgically BEST removed by fracturing the thinner facial cortical plate rather than the thicker lingual cortical plate, if needed.

 

 

DIF:    Application    REF:   p. 65              OBJ:   4

TOP:   CDA: General Chairside, I. A. Demonstrate understanding of basic oral and dental anatomy, physiology, and development | CDA: General Chairside, II. C. Describe how to perform and/or assist with intraoral procedures | CDA: General Chairside, V. A. Oral Health Information

MSC:  NBDHE, Scientific Basis for Dental Hygiene Practice, 1.1.2 Dental Anatomy | NBDHE, Scientific Basis for Dental Hygiene Practice, 5.0 Pathology | NBDHE, Provision of Clinical Dental Hygiene Services, 3.0 Planning and Managing Dental Hygiene Care

 

MULTIPLE RESPONSE

 

  1. From the following list of structures, select which structures are associated with the nasal cavity. (Select all that apply.)
a. Nasion
b. Conchae
c. Meatus
d. Fissure
e. Canal

 

 

ANS:  A, B, C

 

  Feedback
Correct The nasion, nasal conchae, and nasal meatus are associated with the nasal cavity.
Incorrect The fissure and canal are associated with the orbit (superior and inferior orbital fissure as well as the optic canal) and NOT the nasal cavity; fissure and canal are also associated with other areas of the skull but NOT the nasal cavity.

 

 

DIF:    Recall             REF:   pp. 38-40       OBJ:   2

TOP:   CDA: General Chairside, I. A. Demonstrate understanding of basic oral and dental anatomy, physiology, and development

MSC:  NBDHE, Scientific Basis for Dental Hygiene Practice, 1.1.1 Head and Neck Anatomy

 

  1. From the following list of structures, select which structures are associated with the occipital bone. (Select all that apply.)
a. Condyle
b. Tubercle
c. Notch
d. Glabella
e. Eminence

 

 

ANS:  A, B, C

 

  Feedback
Correct The occipital condyle, pharyngeal tubercle, and jugular notch are associated with the occipital bone.
Incorrect The supraorbital notch, glabella, and frontal eminence are associated with the frontal bone and NOT the occipital bone.

 

 

DIF:    Recall             REF:   pp. 47-49       OBJ:   2

TOP:   CDA: General Chairside, I. A. Demonstrate understanding of basic oral and dental anatomy, physiology, and development

MSC:  NBDHE, Scientific Basis for Dental Hygiene Practice, 1.1.1 Head and Neck Anatomy

 

  1. From the following list of structures, select which structures are associated with the frontal bone. (Select all that apply.)
a. Condyle
b. Tubercle
c. Notch
d. Glabella
e. Eminence

 

 

ANS:  C, D, E

 

  Feedback
Correct The supraorbital notch, glabella, and frontal eminence are associated with the frontal bone.
Incorrect The occipital condyle, pharyngeal tubercle, and jugular notch are associated with the occipital bone and NOT the frontal bone.

 

 

DIF:    Recall             REF:   p. 49              OBJ:   2

TOP:   CDA: General Chairside, I. A. Demonstrate understanding of basic oral and dental anatomy, physiology, and development

MSC:  NBDHE, Scientific Basis for Dental Hygiene Practice, 1.1.1 Head and Neck Anatomy

 

  1. From the following list of skull bones, select which skull bones are associated with the paranasal sinuses. (Select all that apply.)
a. Occipital bone
b. Mandible
c. Maxillary bone
d. Sphenoid bone
e. Ethmoid bone

 

 

ANS:  C, D, E

 

  Feedback
Correct The maxilla, sphenoid bone, and ethmoid bone are associated with paranasal sinuses.
Incorrect The occipital bone and mandible are NOT associated with paranasal sinuses.

 

 

DIF:    Recall             REF:   p. 71              OBJ:   2 | 3

TOP:   CDA: General Chairside, I. A. Demonstrate understanding of basic oral and dental anatomy, physiology, and development

MSC:  NBDHE, Scientific Basis for Dental Hygiene Practice, 1.1.1 Head and Neck Anatomy

 

  1. From the following list of skull bones, select which skull bones articulate with the ethmoid bone. (Select all that apply.)
a. Frontal bone
b. Sphenoid bone
c. Lacrimal bones
d. Occipital bones
e. Parietal bones

 

 

ANS:  A, B, C

 

  Feedback
Correct The frontal bone, sphenoid bone, and lacrimal bones articulate with the ethmoid bone.
Incorrect The occipital bone and parietal bones do NOT articulate with the ethmoid bone.

 

 

DIF:    Recall             REF:   pp. 54-57       OBJ:   2

TOP:   CDA: General Chairside, I. A. Demonstrate understanding of basic oral and dental anatomy, physiology, and development

MSC:  NBDHE, Scientific Basis for Dental Hygiene Practice, 1.1.1 Head and Neck Anatomy

 

  1. From the following list of structures, select which structures are associated with the petrous part of the temporal bone. (Select all that apply.)
a. Articular fossa
b. Postglenoid fossa
c. External acoustic meatus
d. Mastoid process
e. Carotid canal

 

 

ANS:  D, E

 

  Feedback
Correct The mastoid process and carotid canal are associated with the petrous part of the temporal bone.
Incorrect The articular fossa and postglenoid fossa are associated with the squamous part of the temporal bone and NOT the petrous part. The external acoustic meatus is associated with the tympanic part of the temporal bone and NOT the petrous part.

 

 

DIF:    Recall             REF:   p. 46              OBJ:   2

TOP:   CDA: General Chairside, I. A. Demonstrate understanding of basic oral and dental anatomy, physiology, and development

MSC:  NBDHE, Scientific Basis for Dental Hygiene Practice, 1.1.1 Head and Neck Anatomy

 

  1. Inadequate or disproportionate bone growth of the upper face or mandible may leave inadequate room for the developing dentition and cause occlusal complications. How can these difficulties with growth involving the dentition BEST be addressed? (Select all that apply.)
a. Performing osseous surgery
b. Checking for underlying endocrine disorder
c. Undergoing orthodontic therapy
d. Extracting third molars

 

 

ANS:  A, B, C

 

  Feedback
Correct These difficulties with growth involving the dentition can BEST be addressed by orthodontic therapy and osseous surgery, if needed, after ruling out any underlying endocrine disorder.
Incorrect Extracting third molars to accommodate growth is a controversial procedure.

 

 

DIF:    Comprehension                              REF:   p. 33              OBJ:   4

TOP:   CDA: General Chairside, I. A. Demonstrate understanding of basic oral and dental anatomy, physiology, and development | CDA: General Chairside, II. C. Describe how to perform and/or assist with intraoral procedures | CDA: General Chairside, II. D. Patient Management | CDA: General Chairside, V. A. Oral Health Information

MSC:  NBDHE, Scientific Basis for Dental Hygiene Practice, 1.1.1 Head and Neck Anatomy | NBDHE, Scientific Basis for Dental Hygiene Practice, 5.0 Pathology | NBDHE, Provision of Clinical Dental Hygiene Services, 3.0 Planning and Managing Dental Hygiene Care

 

  1. From the list below, choose the factors that cause the sphenoid bone to be one of the more difficult bones of the skull to describe and visualize. (Select all that apply.)
a. Bone is only noted from one viewpoint
b. Centrally located within the skull
c. Complex with body and processes
d. Few features and openings

 

 

ANS:  B, C

 

  Feedback
Correct Since this bone is complex and centrally located, parts of the sphenoid are encountered in almost every significant juncture of the skull. The bone itself consists of a body and its processes along with a number of features and openings. Both of these factors allow the sphenoid bone to be noted from various viewpoints of the skull. Thus it is one of the more difficult bones of the skull to describe and visualize.
Incorrect Since this bone is complex and centrally located, parts of the sphenoid are encountered in almost every significant juncture of the skull. The bone itself consists of a body and its processes along with a number of features and openings and NOT few features or openings. Both of these factors allow the sphenoid bone to be noted from various viewpoints of the skull and NOT one viewpoint. Thus it is one of the more difficult bones of the skull to describe and visualize.

 

 

DIF:    Comprehension                              REF:   p. 52              OBJ:   4

TOP:   CDA: General Chairside, I. A. Demonstrate understanding of basic oral and dental anatomy, physiology, and development | CDA: General Chairside, II. C. Describe how to perform and/or assist with intraoral procedures | CDA: General Chairside, II. D. Patient Management | CDA: General Chairside, V. A. Oral Health Information

MSC:  NBDHE, Scientific Basis for Dental Hygiene Practice, 1.1.1 Head and Neck Anatomy | NBDHE, Scientific Basis for Dental Hygiene Practice, 5.0 Pathology | NBDHE, Provision of Clinical Dental Hygiene Services, 3.0 Planning and Managing Dental Hygiene Care

 

  1. From recent studies concerning chronic sinus infection, new concepts of its etiology and treatment have been discovered. What are these new concepts? (Select all that apply.)
a. Cause lies in the nasal mucus
b. Targeting nasal and sinus tissue
c. Cause lies in the bacterial infection
d. Targeting underlying damaging inflammation

 

 

ANS:  A, D

 

  Feedback
Correct Recent studies have found that the cause of chronic sinus infections lies in the nasal mucus. This suggests a beneficial effect of treatments that target primarily the underlying and presumably damage-inflicting nasal and sinus membrane inflammation.
Incorrect Recent studies have found that the cause of chronic sinus infections lies NOT in the nasal and sinus tissue targeted by standard treatment. This suggests that treatments should NOT target the secondary bacterial infection that has been the primary target of past treatments for the disease.

 

 

DIF:    Comprehension                              REF:   p. 74              OBJ:   4

TOP:   CDA: General Chairside, I. A. Demonstrate understanding of basic oral and dental anatomy, physiology, and development | CDA: General Chairside, II. C. Describe how to perform and/or assist with intraoral procedures | CDA: General Chairside, II. D. Patient Management | CDA: General Chairside, V. A. Oral Health Information

MSC:  NBDHE, Scientific Basis for Dental Hygiene Practice, 1.1.1 Head and Neck Anatomy | NBDHE, Scientific Basis for Dental Hygiene Practice, 5.0 Pathology | NBDHE, Provision of Clinical Dental Hygiene Services, 3.0 Planning and Managing Dental Hygiene Care

 

MATCHING

 

From the following list of foramina and openings of the sphenoid bone, match these openings with the CORRECT nerve within.

a. Maxillary nerve
b. Ophthalmic nerve
c. Mandibular nerve
d. Meningeal branch nerve

 

 

  1. Superior orbital fissure

 

  1. Foramen rotundum

 

  1. Foramen ovale

 

  1. Foramen spinosum

 

  1. ANS:  B                    DIF:    Recall            REF:   p. 35, Table 3-3

OBJ:   2

TOP:   CDA: General Chairside, I. A. Demonstrate understanding of basic oral and dental anatomy, physiology, and development

MSC:  NBDHE, Scientific Basis for Dental Hygiene Practice, 1.1.1 Head and Neck Anatomy

 

  1. ANS:  A                    DIF:    Recall            REF:   p. 35, Table 3-3

OBJ:   2

TOP:   CDA: General Chairside, I. A. Demonstrate understanding of basic oral and dental anatomy, physiology, and development

MSC:  NBDHE, Scientific Basis for Dental Hygiene Practice, 1.1.1 Head and Neck Anatomy

 

  1. ANS:  C                    DIF:    Recall            REF:   p. 35, Table 3-3

OBJ:   2

TOP:   CDA: General Chairside, I. A. Demonstrate understanding of basic oral and dental anatomy, physiology, and development

MSC:  NBDHE, Scientific Basis for Dental Hygiene Practice, 1.1.1 Head and Neck Anatomy

 

  1. ANS:  D                    DIF:    Recall            REF:   p. 35, Table 3-3

OBJ:   2

TOP:   CDA: General Chairside, I. A. Demonstrate understanding of basic oral and dental anatomy, physiology, and development

MSC:  NBDHE, Scientific Basis for Dental Hygiene Practice, 1.1.1 Head and Neck Anatomy

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