Test Bank For Chemistry The Molecular Nature of Matter and Change 8th Edition by Martin Silberberg

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Chemistry The Molecular Nature of Matter and Change 8th Edition by Martin SilberbergLUTGENS – TEST BANK

 

Sample  Questions

 

 

Chapter 3 Test Bank

Stoichiometry of Formulas and Equations

 

  1. Calcium fluoride, CaF2, is a source of fluorine and is used to fluoridate drinking water. Calculate its molar mass.
  2. 118.15 g/mol
  3. 99.15 g/mol
  4. C.07 g/mol
  5. 59.08 g/mol
  6. 50.01 g/mol

Accessibility: Keyboard Navigation

Bloom’s: 3. Apply

Difficulty: Easy

Gradable: automatic

Subtopic: Molar Mass

Topic: Stoichiometry and Chemical Reactions

  1. Calculate the molar mass of tetraphosphorus decaoxide, P4O10, a corrosive substance which can be used as a drying agent.
  2. 469.73 g/mol
  3. B.89 g/mol
  4. 190.97 g/mol
  5. 139.88 g/mol
  6. 94.97 g/mol

Accessibility: Keyboard Navigation

Bloom’s: 3. Apply

Difficulty: Easy

Gradable: automatic

Subtopic: Molar Mass

Topic: Stoichiometry and Chemical Reactions

  1. Calculate the molar mass of rubidium carbonate, Rb2CO3.
  2. 340.43 g/mol
  3. 255.00 g/mol
  4. C.94 g/mol
  5. 145.47 g/mol
  6. 113.48 g/mol

Accessibility: Keyboard Navigation

Bloom’s: 3. Apply

Difficulty: Easy

Gradable: automatic

Subtopic: Molar Mass

Topic: Stoichiometry and Chemical Reactions

  1. Calculate the molar mass of (NH4)3AsO4.
  2. 417.80 g/mol
  3. B.03 g/mol
  4. 165.02 g/mol
  5. 156.96 g/mol
  6. 108.96 g/mol

Accessibility: Keyboard Navigation

Bloom’s: 3. Apply

Difficulty: Easy

Gradable: automatic

Subtopic: Molar Mass

Topic: Stoichiometry and Chemical Reactions

  1. Aluminum sulfate, Al2(SO4)3, is used in tanning leather, purifying water, and manufacture of antiperspirants. Calculate its molar mass.
  2. 450.06 g/mol
  3. B.15 g/mol
  4. 315.15 g/mol
  5. 278.02 g/mol
  6. 74.98 g/mol

Accessibility: Keyboard Navigation

Bloom’s: 3. Apply

Difficulty: Easy

Gradable: automatic

Subtopic: Molar Mass

Topic: Stoichiometry and Chemical Reactions

  1. Calculate the molar mass of Ca(BO2)2·6H2O.
  2. 273.87 g/mol
  3. B.79 g/mol
  4. 183.79 g/mol
  5. 174.89 g/mol
  6. 143.71 g/mol

Accessibility: Keyboard Navigation

Bloom’s: 3. Apply

Difficulty: Medium

Gradable: automatic

Subtopic: Molar Mass

Topic: Stoichiometry and Chemical Reactions

  1. Magnesium fluoride is used in the ceramics and glass industry. What is the mass of 1.72 mol of magnesium fluoride?
  2. 43.3 g
  3. 62.3 g
  4. 74.5 g
  5. 92.9 g
  6. E. 107 g

Accessibility: Keyboard Navigation

Bloom’s: 3. Apply

Difficulty: Medium

Gradable: automatic

Subtopic: Mole Conversions

Topic: Stoichiometry and Chemical Reactions

  1. Sodium bromate is used in a mixture which dissolves gold from its ores. Calculate the mass in grams of 4.68 mol of sodium bromate.
  2. A. 706 g
  3. 482 g
  4. 383 g
  5. 32.2 g
  6. 0.0310 g

Accessibility: Keyboard Navigation

Bloom’s: 3. Apply

Difficulty: Medium

Gradable: automatic

Subtopic: Mole Conversions

Topic: Stoichiometry and Chemical Reactions

  1. What is the mass in grams of 0.250 mol of the common antacid calcium carbonate?
  2. 4.00 × 102 g
  3. B.0 g
  4. 17.0 g
  5. 4.00 × 10–2 g
  6. 2.50 × 10–3 g

Accessibility: Keyboard Navigation

Bloom’s: 3. Apply

Difficulty: Medium

Gradable: automatic

Subtopic: Mole Conversions

Topic: Stoichiometry and Chemical Reactions

  1. Calculate the number of moles in 17.8 g of the antacid magnesium hydroxide, Mg(OH)2.
  2. 3.28 mol
  3. 2.32 mol
  4. 0.431 mol
  5. D.305 mol
  6. 0.200 mol

Accessibility: Keyboard Navigation

Bloom’s: 3. Apply

Difficulty: Easy

Gradable: automatic

Subtopic: Mole Conversions

Topic: Stoichiometry and Chemical Reactions

  1. Phosphorus pentachloride, PCl5, a white solid that has a pungent, unpleasant odor, is used as a catalyst for certain organic reactions. Calculate the number of moles in 38.7 g of PCl5.
  2. 5.38 mol
  3. 3.55 mol
  4. 0.583 mol
  5. 0.282 mol
  6. E.186 mol

Accessibility: Keyboard Navigation

Bloom’s: 3. Apply

Difficulty: Easy

Gradable: automatic

Subtopic: Mole Conversions

Topic: Stoichiometry and Chemical Reactions

  1. Aluminum oxide, Al2O3, is used as a filler for paints and varnishes as well as in the manufacture of electrical insulators. Calculate the number of moles in 47.51 g of Al2O3.
  2. 2.377 mol
  3. 2.146 mol
  4. 1.105 mol
  5. D.4660 mol
  6. 0.4207 mol

Accessibility: Keyboard Navigation

Bloom’s: 3. Apply

Difficulty: Easy

Gradable: automatic

Subtopic: Mole Conversions

Topic: Stoichiometry and Chemical Reactions

  1. Which of the following samples has the most moles of the compound?
  2. A.0 g of Li2O
  3. 75.0 g of CaO
  4. 200.0 g of Fe2O3
  5. 50.0 g of CO2
  6. 100.0 g of SO3

Accessibility: Keyboard Navigation

Bloom’s: 3. Apply

Difficulty: Medium

Gradable: automatic

Subtopic: Mole Conversions

Topic: Stoichiometry and Chemical Reactions

  1. Calculate the number of oxygen atoms in 29.34 g of sodium sulfate, Na2SO4.
  2. 1.244 × 1023 O atoms
  3. B.976 × 1023 O atoms
  4. 2.409 × 1024 O atoms
  5. 2.915 × 1024 O atoms
  6. 1.166 × 1025 O atoms

Accessibility: Keyboard Navigation

Bloom’s: 3. Apply

Difficulty: Hard

Gradable: automatic

Subtopic: Mole Conversions

Topic: Stoichiometry and Chemical Reactions

  1. A normal breath takes in about 1.0 L of air. Assuming that air has an average molar mass of 28.8 g, and that its density is 0.97 g/L, how many molecules of air do you take in with each breath?
  2. A.0 × 1022
  3. 2.2 × 1022
  4. 5.8 × 1023
  5. 1.7 × 1025
  6. 1.8 × 1025

Accessibility: Keyboard Navigation

Bloom’s: 3. Apply

Difficulty: Medium

Gradable: automatic

Subtopic: Mole Conversions

Topic: Stoichiometry and Chemical Reactions

  1. Which of the following samples contains the greatest total number atoms?
  2. 50.0 g of Li2O
  3. 75.0 g of CaO
  4. C.0 g of Fe2O3
  5. 50.0 g of CO2
  6. 100.0 g of SO3

Accessibility: Keyboard Navigation

Bloom’s: 3. Apply

Difficulty: Medium

Gradable: automatic

Subtopic: Mole Conversions

Topic: Stoichiometry and Chemical Reactions

  1. A single atom of hydrogen has a mass of 1.0 amu, while a mole of hydrogen atoms has a mass of 1.0 g. Select the correct conversion factor between atomic mass units and grams.
  2. 1 amu = 1 g exactly
  3. 1 amu = 6.0 × 1023 g
  4. C. 1 g = 6.0 × 1023 amu
  5. 1 g = 1.7 × 10–24 amu
  6. None of these choices are correct.

Accessibility: Keyboard Navigation

Bloom’s: 2. Understand

Difficulty: Medium

Gradable: automatic

Subtopic: Mole Conversions

Topic: Stoichiometry and Chemical Reactions

  1. How many atoms are in a drop of mercury that has a diameter of 1.0 mm? (Volume of a sphere is 4πr3/3; density of mercury = 13.6 g/cm3)
  2. A.1 × 1019
  3. 1.7 × 1020
  4. 2.1 × 1022
  5. 1.7 × 1023
  6. None of these choices are correct.

Accessibility: Keyboard Navigation

Bloom’s: 3. Apply

Difficulty: Medium

Gradable: automatic

Subtopic: Mole Conversions

Topic: Stoichiometry and Chemical Reactions

  1. Potassium dichromate, K2Cr2O7, is used in tanning leather, decorating porcelain, and water proofing fabrics. Calculate the number of chromium atoms in 78.82 g of K2Cr2O7.
  2. 9.490 × 1025 Cr atoms
  3. 2.248 × 1024 Cr atoms
  4. 1.124 × 1024 Cr atoms
  5. D.227 × 1023 Cr atoms
  6. 1.613 × 1023 Cr atoms

Accessibility: Keyboard Navigation

Bloom’s: 3. Apply

Difficulty: Hard

Gradable: automatic

Subtopic: Mole Conversions

Topic: Stoichiometry and Chemical Reactions

  1. Sulfur trioxide can react with atmospheric water vapor to form sulfuric acid that falls as acid rain. Calculate the mass in grams of 3.65 × 1020 molecules of SO3.
  2. 6.06 × 10–4 g
  3. 2.91 × 10–2 g
  4. C.85 × 10–2 g
  5. 20.6 g
  6. 1650 g

Accessibility: Keyboard Navigation

Bloom’s: 3. Apply

Difficulty: Medium

Gradable: automatic

Subtopic: Mole Conversions

Topic: Stoichiometry and Chemical Reactions

  1. Calculate the mass in grams of 8.35 × 1022 molecules of CBr4.
  2. 0.0217 g
  3. 0.139 g
  4. 7.21 g
  5. 12.7 g
  6. E.0 g

Accessibility: Keyboard Navigation

Bloom’s: 3. Apply

Difficulty: Medium

Gradable: automatic

Subtopic: Mole Conversions

Topic: Stoichiometry and Chemical Reactions

  1. The number of hydrogen atoms in 0.050 mol of C3H8O3 is
  2. 3.0 × 1022 H atoms.
  3. 1.2 × 1023 H atoms.
  4. C.4 × 1023 H atoms.
  5. 4.8 × 1023 H atoms.
  6. None of these choices are correct.

Accessibility: Keyboard Navigation

Bloom’s: 3. Apply

Difficulty: Easy

Gradable: automatic

Subtopic: Mole Conversions

Topic: Stoichiometry and Chemical Reactions

  1. How many protons are there in a molecule of adrenaline (C9H13NO3), a neurotransmitter and hormone?
  2. 22
  3. 26
  4. 43
  5. D. 98
  6. 183

Accessibility: Keyboard Navigation

Bloom’s: 3. Apply

Difficulty: Medium

Gradable: automatic

Subtopic: Mole Conversions

Topic: Stoichiometry and Chemical Reactions

  1. Copper(II) sulfate pentahydrate, CuSO4·5H2O, is used as a fungicide and algicide. Calculate the mass of oxygen in 1.000 mol of CuSO4·5H2O.
  2. 249.7 g
  3. B.0 g
  4. 96.00 g
  5. 80.00 g
  6. 64.00 g

Accessibility: Keyboard Navigation

Bloom’s: 3. Apply

Difficulty: Easy

Gradable: automatic

Subtopic: Mole Conversions

Topic: Stoichiometry and Chemical Reactions

  1. Lead (II) nitrate is a poisonous substance which has been used in the manufacture of special explosives and as a sensitizer in photography. Calculate the mass of lead in 139 g of Pb(NO3)2.
  2. 107 g
  3. 90.8 g
  4. C.0 g
  5. 83.4 g
  6. 62.6 g

Accessibility: Keyboard Navigation

Bloom’s: 3. Apply

Difficulty: Medium

Gradable: automatic

Subtopic: Mole Conversions

Topic: Stoichiometry and Chemical Reactions

  1. Household sugar, sucrose, has the molecular formula C12H22O11. What is the percent of carbon in sucrose, by mass?
  2. 26.7%
  3. 33.3%
  4. 41.4%
  5. D.1%
  6. 52.8%

Accessibility: Keyboard Navigation

Bloom’s: 3. Apply

Difficulty: Medium

Gradable: automatic

Subtopic: Mass Percent Composition

Topic: Stoichiometry and Chemical Reactions

  1. Determine the percent composition of potassium dichromate, K2Cr2O7.
  2. 17.5% K, 46.6% Cr, 35.9% O
  3. 29.8% K, 39.7% Cr, 30.5% O
  4. 36.5% K, 48.6% Cr, 14.9% O
  5. 37.2% K, 24.7% Cr, 38.1% O
  6. E. None of these choices are correct.

Accessibility: Keyboard Navigation

Bloom’s: 3. Apply

Difficulty: Medium

Gradable: automatic

Subtopic: Mass Percent Composition

Topic: Stoichiometry and Chemical Reactions

  1. Gadolinium oxide, a colorless powder which absorbs carbon dioxide from the air, contains 86.76 mass % Gd. Determine its empirical formula.
  2. A. Gd2O3
  3. Gd3O2
  4. Gd3O4
  5. Gd4O3
  6. GdO

Accessibility: Keyboard Navigation

Bloom’s: 3. Apply

Difficulty: Medium

Gradable: automatic

Subtopic: Formula Determination of Unknown Compounds (Empirical and Molecular Formulas)

Topic: Stoichiometry and Chemical Reactions

  1. Hydroxylamine nitrate contains 29.17 mass % N, 4.20 mass % H, and 66.63 mass % O. Determine its empirical formula.
  2. HNO
  3. B. H2NO2
  4. HN6O16
  5. HN16O7
  6. H2NO3

Accessibility: Keyboard Navigation

Bloom’s: 3. Apply

Difficulty: Medium

Gradable: automatic

Subtopic: Formula Determination of Unknown Compounds (Empirical and Molecular Formulas)

Topic: Stoichiometry and Chemical Reactions

  1. Hydroxylamine nitrate contains 29.17 mass % N, 4.20 mass % H, and 66.63 mass O. If its molar mass is between 94 and 98 g/mol, what is its molecular formula?
  2. NH2O5
  3. B. N2H4O4
  4. N3H3O3
  5. N4H8O2
  6. N2H2O4

Accessibility: Keyboard Navigation

Bloom’s: 3. Apply

Difficulty: Hard

Gradable: automatic

Subtopic: Formula Determination of Unknown Compounds (Empirical and Molecular Formulas)

Topic: Stoichiometry and Chemical Reactions

  1. Analysis of a carbohydrate showed that it consisted of 40.0 % C, 6.71 % H, and 53.3 % O by mass. Its molecular mass was found to be between 140 and 160 amu. What is the molecular formula of this compound?
  2. C4H8O6
  3. B. C5H10O5
  4. C5H12O5
  5. C6H12O4
  6. None of these choices are correct.

Accessibility: Keyboard Navigation

Bloom’s: 3. Apply

Difficulty: Hard

Gradable: automatic

Subtopic: Formula Determination of Unknown Compounds (Empirical and Molecular Formulas)

Topic: Stoichiometry and Chemical Reactions

  1. A compound of bromine and fluorine is used to make UF6, which is an important chemical in processing and reprocessing of nuclear fuel. The compound contains 58.37 mass percent bromine. Determine its empirical formula.
  2. BrF
  3. BrF2
  4. Br2F3
  5. Br3F
  6. E. BrF3

Accessibility: Keyboard Navigation

Bloom’s: 3. Apply

Difficulty: Medium

Gradable: automatic

Subtopic: Formula Determination of Unknown Compounds (Empirical and Molecular Formulas)

Topic: Stoichiometry and Chemical Reactions

  1. A compound containing chromium and silicon contains 73.52 mass percent chromium. Determine its empirical formula.
  2. CrSi3
  3. Cr2Si3
  4. Cr3Si
  5. D. Cr3Si2
  6. Cr2S

Accessibility: Keyboard Navigation

Bloom’s: 3. Apply

Difficulty: Medium

Gradable: automatic

Subtopic: Formula Determination of Unknown Compounds (Empirical and Molecular Formulas)

Topic: Stoichiometry and Chemical Reactions

  1. Alkanes are compounds of carbon and hydrogen with the general formula CnH2n+2. An alkane component of gasoline has a molar mass of between 125 and 130 g/mol. What is the value of n for this alkane?
  2. 4
  3. B. 9
  4. 10
  5. 13
  6. 14

Accessibility: Keyboard Navigation

Bloom’s: 2. Understand

Difficulty: Medium

Gradable: automatic

Subtopic: Formula Determination of Unknown Compounds (Empirical and Molecular Formulas)

Topic: Stoichiometry and Chemical Reactions

  1. Terephthalic acid, used in the production of polyester fibers and films, is composed of carbon, hydrogen, and oxygen. When 0.6943 g of terephthalic acid was subjected to combustion analysis it produced 1.471 g CO2 and 0.226 g H2O. What is its empirical formula?
  2. C2H3O4
  3. C3H4O2
  4. C. C4H3O2
  5. C5H12O4
  6. C2H2O

Accessibility: Keyboard Navigation

Bloom’s: 3. Apply

Difficulty: Hard

Gradable: automatic

Subtopic: Formula Determination of Unknown Compounds (Empirical and Molecular Formulas)

Topic: Stoichiometry and Chemical Reactions

  1. Terephthalic acid, used in the production of polyester fibers and films, is composed of carbon, hydrogen, and oxygen. When 0.6943 g of terephthalic acid was subjected to combustion analysis it produced 1.471 g CO2 and 0.226 g H2O. If its molar mass is between 158 and 167 g/mol, what is its molecular formula?
  2. C4H6O7
  3. C6H8O5
  4. C7H12O4
  5. C4H3O2
  6. E. C8H6O4

Accessibility: Keyboard Navigation

Bloom’s: 3. Apply

Difficulty: Hard

Gradable: automatic

Subtopic: Formula Determination of Unknown Compounds (Empirical and Molecular Formulas)

Topic: Stoichiometry and Chemical Reactions

  1. Hydroxylamine hydrochloride is a powerful reducing agent which is used as a polymerization catalyst. It contains 5.80 mass % H, 20.16 mass % N, 23.02 mass % O, and 51.02 mass % Cl. What is its empirical formula?
  2. H2N7O8Cl18
  3. H2N2O2Cl
  4. HN3O4Cl9
  5. D. H4NOCl
  6. H4NOCl2

Accessibility: Keyboard Navigation

Bloom’s: 3. Apply

Difficulty: Medium

Gradable: automatic

Subtopic: Formula Determination of Unknown Compounds (Empirical and Molecular Formulas)

Topic: Stoichiometry and Chemical Reactions

  1. In the combustion analysis of 0.1127 g of glucose (C6H12O6), what mass, in grams, of CO2 would be produced?
  2. 0.0451 g
  3. 0.0825 g
  4. C.1652 g
  5. 0.4132 g
  6. 1.466 g

Accessibility: Keyboard Navigation

Bloom’s: 3. Apply

Difficulty: Medium

Gradable: automatic

Subtopic: Formula Determination of Unknown Compounds (Empirical and Molecular Formulas)

Topic: Stoichiometry and Chemical Reactions

  1. Balance the following equation:

B2O3(s) + HF(l) → BF3(g) + H2O(l)

  1. A. B2O3(s) + 6HF(l) → 2BF3(g) + 3H2O(l)
  2. B2O3(s) + H6F6(l) → B2F6(g) + H6O3(l)
  3. B2O3(s) + 2HF(l) → 2BF3(g) + H2O(l)
  4. B2O3(s) + 3HF(l) → 2BF3(g) + 3H2O(l)
  5. B2O3(s) + 6HF(l) → 2BF3(g) + 6H2O(l)

Accessibility: Keyboard Navigation

Bloom’s: 3. Apply

Difficulty: Easy

Gradable: automatic

Subtopic: Writing and Balancing Chemical Equations

Topic: Stoichiometry and Chemical Reactions

  1. Balance the following equation:

UO2(s) + HF(l) → UF4(s) + H2O(l)

  1. UO2(s) + 2HF(l) → UF4(s) + H2O(l)
  2. B. UO2(s) + 4HF(l) → UF4(s) + 2H2O(l)
  3. UO2 (s) + H4F4(l) → UF4 (s) + H4O2(l)
  4. UO2(s) + 4HF(l) → UF4(s) + 4H2O(l)
  5. UO2(s) + 8HF(l) → 2UF4(s) + 4H2O(l)

Accessibility: Keyboard Navigation

Bloom’s: 3. Apply

Difficulty: Easy

Gradable: automatic

Subtopic: Writing and Balancing Chemical Equations

Topic: Stoichiometry and Chemical Reactions

  1. Balance the following equation for the combustion of benzene:

C6H6(l) + O2(g) → H2O(g) + CO2(g)

  1. C6H6(l) + 9O2(g) → 3H2O(g) + 6CO2(g)
  2. C6H6(l) + 9O2(g) → 6H2O(g) + 6CO2(g)
  3. C. 2C6H6(l) + 15O2(g) → 6H2O(g) + 12CO2(g)
  4. C6H6(l) + 15O2(g) → 3H2O(g) + 6CO2(g)
  5. 2C6H6(l) + 9O2(g) → 6H2O(g) + 12CO2(g)

Accessibility: Keyboard Navigation

Bloom’s: 3. Apply

Difficulty: Easy

Gradable: automatic

Subtopic: Writing and Balancing Chemical Equations

Topic: Stoichiometry and Chemical Reactions

  1. Balance the following equation:

C8H18O3(l) + O2(g) → H2O(g) + CO2(g)

  1. C8H18O3(l) + 😯2(g) → 9H2O(g) + 8CO2(g)
  2. B. C8H18O3(l) + 11O2(g) → 9H2O(g) + 8CO2(g)
  3. 2C8H18O3(l) + 22O2(g) → 9H2O(g) + 16CO2(g)
  4. C8H18O3(l) + 13O2(g) → 18H2O(g) + 8CO2(g)
  5. 2C8H18O3(l) + 17O2(g) → 18H2O(g) + 16CO2(g)

Accessibility: Keyboard Navigation

Bloom’s: 3. Apply

Difficulty: Medium

Gradable: automatic

Subtopic: Writing and Balancing Chemical Equations

Topic: Stoichiometry and Chemical Reactions

  1. Balance the following equation:

Ca3(PO4)2(s) + SiO2(s) + C(s) → CaSiO3(s) + CO(g) + P4(s)

  1. Ca3(PO4)2(s) + 3SiO2(s) + 8C(s) → 3CaSiO3(s) + 8CO(g) + P4(s)
  2. Ca3(PO4)2(s) + 3SiO2(s) + 14C(s) → 3CaSiO3(s) + 14CO(g) + P4(s)
  3. Ca3(PO4)2(s) + 3SiO2(s) + 8C(s) → 3CaSiO3(s) + 8CO(g) + 2P4(s)
  4. D. 2Ca3(PO4)2(s) + 6SiO2(s) + 10C(s) → 6CaSiO3(s) + 10CO(g) + P4(s)
  5. 2Ca3(PO4)2(s) + 6SiO2(s) + 10C(s) → 6CaSiO3(s) + 10CO(g) + 4P4(s)

Accessibility: Keyboard Navigation

Bloom’s: 3. Apply

Difficulty: Medium

Gradable: automatic

Subtopic: Writing and Balancing Chemical Equations

Topic: Stoichiometry and Chemical Reactions

  1. How many molecules of molecular oxygen react with four molecules of NH3 to form four molecules of nitrogen monoxide and six molecules of water?
  2. 2
  3. 10
  4. 3
  5. 4
  6. E. 5

Accessibility: Keyboard Navigation

Bloom’s: 3. Apply

Difficulty: Medium

Gradable: automatic

Subtopic: Writing and Balancing Chemical Equations

Topic: Stoichiometry and Chemical Reactions

  1. Sulfur dioxide reacts with chlorine to produce thionyl chloride (used as a drying agent for inorganic halides) and dichlorine oxide (used as a bleach for wood, pulp, and textiles).

SO2(g) + 2Cl2(g) → SOCl2(g) + Cl2O(g)

If 0.400 mol of Cl2 reacts with excess SO2, how many moles of Cl2O are formed?

  1. 0.800 mol
  2. 0.400 mol
  3. C.200 mol
  4. 0.100 mol
  5. 0.0500 mol

Accessibility: Keyboard Navigation

Bloom’s: 3. Apply

Difficulty: Easy

Gradable: automatic

Subtopic: Calculating Amounts of Reactant and Product (including solutions)

Topic: Stoichiometry and Chemical Reactions

  1. Aluminum will react with bromine to form aluminum bromide (used as an acid catalyst in organic synthesis).

Al(s) + Br2(l) → Al2Br6(s) [unbalanced]

How many moles of Al are needed to form 2.43 mol of Al2Br6?

  1. 7.29 mol
  2. B.86 mol
  3. 2.43 mol
  4. 1.62 mol
  5. 1.22 mol

Accessibility: Keyboard Navigation

Bloom’s: 3. Apply

Difficulty: Easy

Gradable: automatic

Subtopic: Calculating Amounts of Reactant and Product (including solutions)

Topic: Stoichiometry and Chemical Reactions

  1. Ammonia will react with fluorine to produce dinitrogen tetrafluoride and hydrogen fluoride (used in production of aluminum, in uranium processing, and in frosting of light bulbs).

2NH3(g) + 5F2(g) → N2F4(g) + 6HF(g)

How many moles of NH3 are needed to react completely with 13.6 mol of F2?

  1. 34.0 mol
  2. 27.2 mol
  3. 6.80 mol
  4. D.44 mol
  5. 2.27 mol

Accessibility: Keyboard Navigation

Bloom’s: 3. Apply

Difficulty: Easy

Gradable: automatic

Subtopic: Calculating Amounts of Reactant and Product (including solutions)

Topic: Stoichiometry and Chemical Reactions

  1. Ammonia, an important source of fixed nitrogen that can be metabolized by plants, is produced using the Haber process in which nitrogen and hydrogen combine.

N2(g) + 3H2(g) → 2NH3(g)

How many grams of nitrogen are needed to produce 325 grams of ammonia?

  1. 1070 g
  2. 535 g
  3. C. 267 g
  4. 178 g
  5. 108 g

Accessibility: Keyboard Navigation

Bloom’s: 3. Apply

Difficulty: Medium

Gradable: automatic

Subtopic: Calculating Amounts of Reactant and Product (including solutions)

Topic: Stoichiometry and Chemical Reactions

  1. How many grams of sodium fluoride (used in water fluoridation and manufacture of insecticides) are needed to form 485 g of sulfur tetrafluoride?

3SCl2(l) + 4NaF(s) → SF4(g) + S2Cl2(l) + 4NaCl(s)

  1. 1940 g
  2. 1510 g
  3. C. 754 g
  4. 205 g
  5. 51.3 g

Accessibility: Keyboard Navigation

Bloom’s: 3. Apply

Difficulty: Medium

Gradable: automatic

Subtopic: Calculating Amounts of Reactant and Product (including solutions)

Topic: Stoichiometry and Chemical Reactions

  1. How many grams of oxygen are needed to react completely with 200.0 g of ammonia, NH3?

4NH3(g) + 5O2(g) → 4NO(g) + 6H2O(g)

  1. A.7 g
  2. 300.6 g
  3. 250.0 g
  4. 3.406 g
  5. 2.180 g

Accessibility: Keyboard Navigation

Bloom’s: 3. Apply

Difficulty: Medium

Gradable: automatic

Subtopic: Calculating Amounts of Reactant and Product (including solutions)

Topic: Stoichiometry and Chemical Reactions

  1. Phosphine, an extremely poisonous and highly reactive gas, will react with oxygen to form tetraphosphorus decaoxide and water.

PH3(g) + O2(g) → P4O10(s) + H2O(g) [unbalanced]

Calculate the mass of P4O10(s) formed when 225 g of PH3 reacts with excess oxygen.

  1. 1880 g
  2. 940. g
  3. 900. g
  4. D. 470 g
  5. 56.3 g

Accessibility: Keyboard Navigation

Bloom’s: 3. Apply

Difficulty: Medium

Gradable: automatic

Subtopic: Calculating Amounts of Reactant and Product (including solutions)

Topic: Stoichiometry and Chemical Reactions

  1. Potassium chlorate (used in fireworks, flares, and safety matches) forms oxygen and potassium chloride when heated.

KClO3(s) → KCl(s) + O2(g) [unbalanced]

How many grams of oxygen are formed when 26.4 g of potassium chlorate is heated?

  1. 223 g
  2. 99.1 g
  3. C.3 g
  4. 6.86 g
  5. 4.60 g

Accessibility: Keyboard Navigation

Bloom’s: 3. Apply

Difficulty: Medium

Gradable: automatic

Subtopic: Calculating Amounts of Reactant and Product (including solutions)

Topic: Stoichiometry and Chemical Reactions

  1. Aluminum metal reacts with chlorine gas to form solid aluminum trichloride, AlCl3. What mass of chlorine gas is needed to react completely with 163 g of aluminum?
  2. 214 g
  3. 245 g
  4. 321 g
  5. 489 g
  6. E. 643 g

Accessibility: Keyboard Navigation

Bloom’s: 3. Apply

Difficulty: Medium

Gradable: automatic

Subtopic: Calculating Amounts of Reactant and Product (including solutions)

Topic: Stoichiometry and Chemical Reactions

  1. Lead(II) sulfide was once used in glazing earthenware. It will also react with hydrogen peroxide to form lead(II) sulfate and water. How many grams of hydrogen peroxide are needed to react completely with 265 g of lead(II) sulfide?
  2. A. 151 g
  3. 123 g
  4. 50.3 g
  5. 37.7 g
  6. 9.41 g

Accessibility: Keyboard Navigation

Bloom’s: 3. Apply

Difficulty: Medium

Gradable: automatic

Subtopic: Calculating Amounts of Reactant and Product (including solutions)

Topic: Stoichiometry and Chemical Reactions

  1. An important reaction sequence in the industrial production of nitric acid is the following:

N2(g) + 3H2(g) → 2NH3(g)

4NH3(g) + 5O2(g) → 4NO(g) + 6H2O(l)

Starting from 20.0 mol of nitrogen gas in the first reaction, how many moles of oxygen gas are required in the second one?

  1. 12.5 mol O2
  2. 20.0 mol O2
  3. 25.0 mol O2
  4. D.0 mol O2
  5. 100. mol O2

Accessibility: Keyboard Navigation

Bloom’s: 3. Apply

Difficulty: Easy

Gradable: automatic

Subtopic: Calculating Amounts of Reactant and Product (including solutions)

Topic: Stoichiometry and Chemical Reactions

  1. In a blast furnace, elemental iron is produced from a mixture of coke (C), iron ore (Fe3O4), and other reactants. An important reaction sequence is

2C(s) + O2(g) → 2CO(g)

Fe3O4(s) + 4CO(g) → 3Fe(l) + 4CO2(g)

How many moles of iron can be formed in this sequence when 1.00 mol of carbon, as coke, is consumed?

  1. 6.00 mol Fe
  2. 3.00 mol Fe
  3. 1.33 mol Fe
  4. 1.25 mol Fe
  5. E.750 mol Fe

Accessibility: Keyboard Navigation

Bloom’s: 3. Apply

Difficulty: Easy

Gradable: automatic

Subtopic: Calculating Amounts of Reactant and Product (including solutions)

Topic: Stoichiometry and Chemical Reactions

  1. The iodine “clock reaction” involves the following sequence of reactions occurring in a reaction mixture in a single beaker.
  2. IO3(aq) + 5I(aq) + 6H+(aq) → 3I2(aq) + 3H2O(l)
  3. I2(aq) + 2S2O32–(aq) → 2I(aq) + S4O62–(aq)

 

The molecular iodine (I2) formed in reaction 1 is immediately used up in reaction 2, so that no iodine accumulates. What is the overall reaction occurring in this experiment?

  1. IO3(aq) + 3I(aq) + 2S2O32–(aq) + 6H+(aq) → 2I2(aq) + S4O62–(aq) + 3H2O(l)
  2. IO3(aq) + 4S2O32–(aq) + 6H+(aq) → I(aq) + 2S4O62–(aq) + 3H2O(l)
  3. C. IO3(aq) + 6S2O32–(aq) + 6H+(aq) → I(aq) + 3S4O62–(aq) + 3H2O(l)
  4. IO3(aq) + I2(aq) + 8S2O32–(aq) + 6H+(aq) → 3I(aq) + 4S4O62–(aq) + 3H2O(l)
  5. IO3(aq) + 2I2(aq) + 6S2O32–(aq) + 6H+(aq) → 5I(aq) + 3S4O62–(aq) + 3H2O(l)

Accessibility: Keyboard Navigation

Bloom’s: 3. Apply

Difficulty: Medium

Gradable: automatic

Subtopic: Writing and Balancing Chemical Equations

Topic: Stoichiometry and Chemical Reactions

  1. The iodine “clock reaction” involves the following sequence of reactions occurring in a reaction mixture in a single beaker.
  2. IO3(aq) + 5I(aq) + 6H+(aq) → 3I2(aq) + 3H2O(l)
  3. I2(aq) + 2S2O32–(aq) → 2I(aq) + S4O62–(aq)

 

The molecular iodine (I2) formed in reaction 1 is immediately used up in reaction 2, so that no iodine accumulates. In one experiment, a student made up a reaction mixture which initially contained 0.0020 mol of iodate ions (IO3). If the iodate ions reacted completely, how many moles of thiosulfate ions (S2O32–) were needed in reaction 2, in order to react completely with the iodine (I2) produced in reaction 1?

  1. 0.0020 mol
  2. B.012 mol
  3. 0.0040 mol
  4. 0.0010 mol
  5. 0.0060 mol

Accessibility: Keyboard Navigation

Bloom’s: 3. Apply

Difficulty: Medium

Gradable: automatic

Subtopic: Calculating Amounts of Reactant and Product (including solutions)

Topic: Stoichiometry and Chemical Reactions

  1. Aluminum oxide (used as an adsorbent or a catalyst for organic reactions) forms when aluminum reacts with oxygen.

4Al(s) + 3O2(g) → 2Al2O3(s)

A mixture of 82.49 g of aluminum ( = 26.98 g/mol) and 117.65 g of oxygen ( = 32.00 g/mol) is allowed to react. What mass of aluminum oxide ( = 101.96 g/mol) can be formed?

  1. A.8 g
  2. 200.2 g
  3. 249.9 g
  4. 311.7 g
  5. 374.9 g

Bloom’s: 3. Apply

Difficulty: Hard

Gradable: automatic

Subtopic: Limiting Reactant

Topic: Stoichiometry and Chemical Reactions

  1. Aluminum reacts with oxygen to produce aluminum oxide which can be used as an adsorbent, desiccant, or catalyst for organic reactions.

4Al(s) + 3O2(g) → 2Al2O3(s)

A mixture of 82.49 g of aluminum ( = 26.98 g/mol) and 117.65 g of oxygen ( = 32.00 g/mol) is allowed to react. Identify the limiting reactant and determine the mass of the excess reactant present in the vessel when the reaction is complete.

  1. Oxygen is the limiting reactant; 19.81 g of aluminum remain.
  2. Oxygen is the limiting reactant; 35.16 g of aluminum remain.
  3. Aluminum is the limiting reactant; 16.70 g of oxygen remain.
  4. Aluminum is the limiting reactant; 35.16 g of oxygen remain.
  5. E. Aluminum is the limiting reactant; 44.24 g of oxygen remain.

Bloom’s: 3. Apply

Difficulty: Hard

Gradable: automatic

Subtopic: Limiting Reactant

Topic: Stoichiometry and Chemical Reactions

  1. Magnesium reacts with iron(III) chloride to form magnesium chloride (which can be used in fireproofing wood and in disinfectants) and iron.

3Mg(s) + 2FeCl3(s) → 3MgCl2(s) + 2Fe(s)

A mixture of 41.0 g of magnesium ( = 24.31 g/mol) and 175 g of iron(III) chloride ( = 162.2 g/mol) is allowed to react. What mass of magnesium chloride = 95.21 g/mol) is formed?

  1. 68.5 g MgCl2
  2. 77.0 g MgCl2
  3. 71.4 g MgCl2
  4. 107 g MgCl2
  5. E. 154 g MgCl2

Bloom’s: 3. Apply

Difficulty: Hard

Gradable: automatic

Subtopic: Limiting Reactant

Topic: Stoichiometry and Chemical Reactions

  1. Magnesium (used in the manufacture of light alloys) reacts with iron(III) chloride to form magnesium chloride and iron.

3Mg(s) + 2FeCl3(s) → 3MgCl2(s) + 2Fe(s)

A mixture of 41.0 g of magnesium ( = 24.31 g/mol) and 175 g of iron(III) chloride ( = 162.2 g/mol) is allowed to react. Identify the limiting reactant and determine the mass of the excess reactant present in the vessel when the reaction is complete.

  1. Limiting reactant is Mg; 67 g of FeCl3 remain.
  2. Limiting reactant is Mg; 134 g of FeCl3 remain.
  3. Limiting reactant is Mg; 104 g of FeCl3 remain.
  4. D. Limiting reactant is FeCl3; 2 g of Mg
  5. Limiting reactant is FeCl3; 87 g of Mg remain.

 

Bloom’s: 3. Apply

Difficulty: Hard

Gradable: automatic

Subtopic: Limiting Reactant

Topic: Stoichiometry and Chemical Reactions

  1. Potassium chloride is used as a substitute for sodium chloride for individuals with high blood pressure. Identify the limiting reactant and determine the mass of the excess reactant remaining when 7.00 g of chlorine gas reacts with 5.00 g of potassium to form potassium chloride.
  2. A. Potassium is the limiting reactant; 2.47 g of chlorine remain.
  3. Potassium is the limiting reactant; 7.23 g of chlorine remain.
  4. Chlorine is the limiting reactant; 4.64 g of potassium remain.
  5. Chlorine is the limiting reactant; 2.70 g of potassium remain.
  6. No limiting reagent: the reactants are present in the correct stoichiometric ratio.

Accessibility: Keyboard Navigation

Bloom’s: 3. Apply

Difficulty: Hard

Gradable: automatic

Subtopic: Limiting Reactant

Topic: Stoichiometry and Chemical Reactions

  1. Tetraphosphorus hexaoxide ( = 219.9 g/mol) is formed by the reaction of phosphorus with oxygen gas.

P4(s) + 3O2(g) → P4O6(s)

If a mixture of 75.3 g of phosphorus and 38.7 g of oxygen produce 43.3 g of P4O6, what is the percent yield for the reaction?

  1. 57.5%
  2. B.8%
  3. 38.0%
  4. 32.4%
  5. 16.3%

Bloom’s: 3. Apply

Difficulty: Hard

Gradable: automatic

Subtopic: Reaction Yield

Topic: Stoichiometry and Chemical Reactions

  1. What is the percent yield for the reaction

PCl3(g) + Cl2(g) → PCl5(g)

If 119.3 g of PCl5 (M = 208.2 g/mol) are formed when 61.3 g of Cl2 ( = 70.91 g/mol) react with excess PCl3?

  1. 195%
  2. 85.0%
  3. C.3%
  4. 51.4%
  5. 43.7%

Bloom’s: 3. Apply

Difficulty: Medium

Gradable: automatic

Subtopic: Reaction Yield

Topic: Stoichiometry and Chemical Reactions

  1. Methanol (CH4O) is converted to bromomethane (CH3Br) as follows:

CH4O + HBr → CH3Br + H2O

If 12.23 g of bromomethane are produced when 5.00 g of methanol is reacted with excess HBr, what is the percentage yield?

  1. 40.9%
  2. B.6%
  3. 100%
  4. 121%
  5. 245%

Accessibility: Keyboard Navigation

Bloom’s: 3. Apply

Difficulty: Medium

Gradable: automatic

Subtopic: Reaction Yield

Topic: Stoichiometry and Chemical Reactions

  1. One mole of O2 has a mass of 16.0 g.

FALSE

Accessibility: Keyboard Navigation

Bloom’s: 2. Understand

Difficulty: Easy

Gradable: automatic

Subtopic: Molar Mass

Topic: Stoichiometry and Chemical Reactions

  1. One mole of methane (CH4) contains a total of 3 × 1024 atoms.

TRUE

Accessibility: Keyboard Navigation

Bloom’s: 2. Understand

Difficulty: Easy

Gradable: automatic

Subtopic: Mole Conversions

Topic: Stoichiometry and Chemical Reactions

  1. The formula CH3O0.5 is an example of an empirical formula.

FALSE

Accessibility: Keyboard Navigation

Bloom’s: 2. Understand

Difficulty: Easy

Gradable: automatic

Subtopic: Chemical Formulas

Topic: Components of Matter

  1. In combustion analysis, the carbon and hydrogen contents of a substance are determined from the CO2 and H2O, respectively, which are collected in the absorbers.

TRUE

Accessibility: Keyboard Navigation

Bloom’s: 1. Remember

Difficulty: Easy

Gradable: automatic

Subtopic: Formula Determination of Unknown Compounds (Empirical and Molecular Formulas)

Topic: Stoichiometry and Chemical Reactions

  1. In combustion analysis, the oxygen content of a substance is equal to the total oxygen in the CO2 and H2O collected in the absorbers.

FALSE

Accessibility: Keyboard Navigation

Bloom’s: 1. Remember

Difficulty: Medium

Gradable: automatic

Subtopic: Formula Determination of Unknown Compounds (Empirical and Molecular Formulas)

Topic: Stoichiometry and Chemical Reactions

  1. Constitutional (structural) isomers have the same empirical formula but different molecular formulas.

FALSE

Accessibility: Keyboard Navigation

Bloom’s: 1. Remember

Difficulty: Medium

Gradable: automatic

Subtopic: Chemical Formulas

Topic: Components of Matter

  1. Constitutional (structural) isomers have the same molecular formula but different structural formulas.

TRUE

Accessibility: Keyboard Navigation

Bloom’s: 1. Remember

Difficulty: Medium

Gradable: automatic

Subtopic: Chemical Formulas

Topic: Components of Matter

  1. In a correctly balanced equation, the number of reactant molecules must equal the number of product molecules.

FALSE

Accessibility: Keyboard Navigation

Bloom’s: 1. Remember

Difficulty: Easy

Gradable: automatic

Subtopic: Stoichiometry and Chemical Reactions

Subtopic: Writing and Balancing Chemical Equations

Topic: Components of Matter

 

Category                                                                                                                                        # of Questions

Accessibility: Keyboard Navigation                                                                                                                        68

Bloom’s: 1. Remember                                                                                                                                            5

Bloom’s: 2. Understand                                                                                                                                           5

Bloom’s: 3. Apply                                                                                                                                                   64

Difficulty: Easy                                                                                                                                                       23

Difficulty: Hard                                                                                                                                                       12

Difficulty: Medium                                                                                                                                                  39

Gradable: automatic                                                                                                                                                 74

Subtopic: Calculating Amounts of Reactant and Product (including solutions)                                                       13

Subtopic: Chemical Formulas                                                                                                                                  3

Subtopic: Formula Determination of Unknown Compounds (Empirical and Molecular Formulas)                        13

Subtopic: Limiting Reactant                                                                                                                                     5

Subtopic: Mass Percent Composition                                                                                                                      2

Subtopic: Molar Mass                                                                                                                                             7

Subtopic: Mole Conversions                                                                                                                                   20

Subtopic: Reaction Yield                                                                                                                                         3

Subtopic: Stoichiometry and Chemical Reactions                                                                                                    1

Subtopic: Writing and Balancing Chemical Equations                                                                                             8

Topic: Components of Matter                                                                                                                                  4

Topic: Stoichiometry and Chemical Reactions                                                                                                         70

 

Chapter 5 Test Bank

Gases and the Kinetic-Molecular Theory

 

  1. A ballerina weighs 103 lbs and is up on her toes with only 10.0 cm2 of her slippers in contact with the floor. What pressure is she exerting on the floor?
  2. A.59 × 105 Pa
  3. 4.59 × 103 Pa
  4. 4.59 × 101 Pa
  5. 4.59 × 10–1 Pa
  6. 4.59 × 10–3 Pa

Accessibility: Keyboard Navigation

Bloom’s: 3. Apply

Difficulty: Medium

Gradable: automatic

Subtopic: Units of Pressure and STP

Topic: Gases

  1. Given that pressure has dimensions of force ÷ area; that force has dimensions of mass × acceleration; and that the S.I. unit of pressure is the pascal, what is 1 pascal in terms of S.I. base units?
  2. A. 1 Pa = 1000 g/cm·s2
  3. 1 Pa = 1 g/m·s2
  4. 1 Pa = 10–3 kg·m/s2
  5. 1 Pa = 1 kg·m/s2
  6. 1 Pa = 1 kg/m·s2

Accessibility: Keyboard Navigation

Bloom’s: 2. Understand

Difficulty: Medium

Gradable: automatic

Subtopic: Units of Pressure and STP

Topic: Gases

  1. Mineral oil can be used in place of mercury in manometers when small pressure changes are to be measured. What is the pressure of an oxygen sample in mm of mineral oil if its pressure is 28.5 mm Hg?

(d of mineral oil = 0.88 g/mL; d of Hg = 13.5 g/mL)

  1. 1.9 mm mineral oil
  2. 15 mm mineral oil
  3. 32 mm mineral oil
  4. 380 mm mineral oil
  5. E. 440 mm mineral oil

Accessibility: Keyboard Navigation

Bloom’s: 3. Apply

Difficulty: Medium

Gradable: automatic

Subtopic: Units of Pressure and STP

Topic: Gases

  1. Mercury is 13.6 times as dense as liquid water. What would be the reading of a water-filled barometer at normal atmospheric pressure, 760. mmHg?
  2. 1.03 × 103 torr
  3. 1.03 × 103 Pa
  4. 1.03 × 103 mm height of water column
  5. D.03 × 103 cm height of water column
  6. 13.6 atm

Accessibility: Keyboard Navigation

Bloom’s: 3. Apply

Difficulty: Medium

Gradable: automatic

Subtopic: Units of Pressure and STP

Topic: Gases

  1. A flask containing helium gas is connected to an open-ended mercury manometer. The open end is exposed to the atmosphere, where the prevailing pressure is 752 torr. The mercury level in the open arm is 26 mm above that in the arm connected to the flask of helium. What is the helium pressure, in torr?
  2. –26 torr
  3. 26 torr
  4. 726 torr
  5. D. 778 torr
  6. None of these choices are correct.

Accessibility: Keyboard Navigation

Bloom’s: 3. Apply

Difficulty: Easy

Gradable: automatic

Subtopic: Units of Pressure and STP

Topic: Gases

  1. A flask containing neon gas is connected to an open-ended mercury manometer. The open end is exposed to the atmosphere, where the prevailing pressure is 745 torr. The mercury level in the open arm is 50. mm below that in the arm connected to the flask of neon. What is the neon pressure, in torr?
  2. –50. torr
  3. 50. torr
  4. C. 695 torr
  5. 795 torr
  6. None of these choices are correct.

Accessibility: Keyboard Navigation

Bloom’s: 3. Apply

Difficulty: Easy

Gradable: automatic

Subtopic: Units of Pressure and STP

Topic: Gases

  1. A flask containing argon gas is connected to a closed-ended mercury manometer. The closed end is under vacuum. If the mercury level in the closed arm is 230. mm above that in the arm connected to the flask, what is the argon pressure, in torr?
  2. –230.
  3. B.
  4. 530.
  5. 790.
  6. None of these choices are correct.

Accessibility: Keyboard Navigation

Bloom’s: 3. Apply

Difficulty: Easy

Gradable: automatic

Subtopic: Units of Pressure and STP

Topic: Gases

  1. Hydrogen gas exerts a pressure of 466 torr in a container. What is this pressure in atmospheres?
  2. 0.217 atm
  3. 0.466 atm
  4. C.613 atm
  5. 1.63 atm
  6. 4.60 atm

Accessibility: Keyboard Navigation

Bloom’s: 3. Apply

Difficulty: Easy

Gradable: automatic

Subtopic: Units of Pressure and STP

Topic: Gases

  1. The pressure of hydrogen sulfide gas in a container is 35,650 Pa. What is this pressure in torr?
  2. 46.91 torr
  3. B.4 torr
  4. 351.8 torr
  5. 3612 torr
  6. 27090 torr

Accessibility: Keyboard Navigation

Bloom’s: 3. Apply

Difficulty: Easy

Gradable: automatic

Subtopic: Units of Pressure and STP

Topic: Gases

  1. The pressure of sulfur dioxide in a container is 159 kPa. What is this pressure in atmospheres?
  2. 0.209 atm
  3. 0.637 atm
  4. C.57 atm
  5. 21.2 atm
  6. 15900 atm

Accessibility: Keyboard Navigation

Bloom’s: 3. Apply

Difficulty: Easy

Gradable: automatic

Subtopic: Units of Pressure and STP

Topic: Gases

  1. The air pressure in a volleyball is 75 psi. What is this pressure in torr?
  2. 520 torr
  3. 562 torr
  4. C. 3900 torr
  5. 7600 torr
  6. 75000 torr

Accessibility: Keyboard Navigation

Bloom’s: 3. Apply

Difficulty: Easy

Gradable: automatic

Subtopic: Units of Pressure and STP

Topic: Gases

  1. “The volume of an ideal gas is directly proportional to the number of moles of the gas at constant temperature and pressure” is a statement of __________________ Law.
  2. Charles’s
  3. Boyle’s
  4. Amontons’s
  5. D. Avogadro’s
  6. Dalton’s

Accessibility: Keyboard Navigation

Bloom’s: 1. Remember

Difficulty: Easy

Gradable: automatic

Subtopic: The Gas Laws (Boyle, Avogadro, and Charles)

Topic: Gases

  1. “The pressure of an ideal gas is inversely proportional to its volume at constant temperature and number of moles” is a statement of __________________ Law.
  2. Charles’s
  3. B. Boyle’s
  4. Amontons’s
  5. Avogadro’s
  6. Gay-Lussac’s

Accessibility: Keyboard Navigation

Bloom’s: 1. Remember

Difficulty: Easy

Gradable: automatic

Subtopic: The Gas Laws (Boyle, Avogadro, and Charles)

Topic: Gases

  1. “The pressure of an ideal gas is directly proportional to its absolute temperature at constant volume and number of moles” is a statement of ________________ Law.
  2. Charles’s
  3. Boyle’s
  4. Amontons’s
  5. D. Avogadro’s
  6. Gay-Lussac’s

Accessibility: Keyboard Navigation

Bloom’s: 1. Remember

Difficulty: Easy

Gradable: automatic

Subtopic: The Gas Laws (Boyle, Avogadro, and Charles)

Topic: Gases

  1. “The volume of an ideal gas is directly proportional to its absolute temperature at constant pressure and number of moles” is a statement of ________________ Law.
  2. A. Charles’s
  3. Boyle’s
  4. Amontons’s
  5. Avogadro’s
  6. Dalton’s

Accessibility: Keyboard Navigation

Bloom’s: 1. Remember

Difficulty: Easy

Gradable: automatic

Subtopic: The Gas Laws (Boyle, Avogadro, and Charles)

Topic: Gases

  1. “The total pressure in a mixture of unreacting gases is equal to the sum of the partial pressures of the individual gases” is a statement of __________________ Law.
  2. Charles’s
  3. Graham’s
  4. Boyle’s
  5. Avogadro’s
  6. E. Dalton’s

Accessibility: Keyboard Navigation

Bloom’s: 1. Remember

Difficulty: Easy

Gradable: automatic

Subtopic: Dalton’s Law of Partial Pressures

Topic: Gases

  1. “The rate of effusion of a gas is inversely proportional to the square root of its molar mass” is a statement of ______________________ Law.
  2. Charles’s
  3. B. Graham’s
  4. Dalton’s
  5. Avogadro’s
  6. Boyle’s

Accessibility: Keyboard Navigation

Bloom’s: 1. Remember

Difficulty: Easy

Gradable: automatic

Subtopic: Effusion and Diffusion (Graham’s Law)

Topic: Gases

  1. Which of the lines on the figure below is the best representation of the relationship between the volume of a gas and its pressure, other factors remaining constant?

 

  1. a
  2. b
  3. c
  4. d
  5. E. e

Bloom’s: 2. Understand

Difficulty: Medium

Gradable: automatic

Subtopic: The Gas Laws (Boyle, Avogadro, and Charles)

Topic: Gases

  1. Which of the lines on the figure below is the best representation of the relationship between the volume of a gas and its absolute temperature, other factors remaining constant?
  2. a
  3. b
  4. C. c
  5. d
  6. e

Bloom’s: 2. Understand

Difficulty: Medium

Gradable: automatic

Subtopic: The Gas Laws (Boyle, Avogadro, and Charles)

Topic: Gases

  1. Which of the lines on the figure below is the best representation of the relationship between the volume of a gas and its Celsius temperature, other factors remaining constant?

 

  1. a
  2. B. b
  3. c
  4. d
  5. e

Bloom’s: 2. Understand

Difficulty: Medium

Gradable: automatic

Subtopic: The Gas Laws (Boyle, Avogadro, and Charles)

Topic: Gases

  1. Which of the lines on the figure below is the best representation of the relationship between the volume and the number of moles of a gas, measured at constant temperature and pressure?

 

  1. a
  2. b
  3. C. c
  4. d
  5. e

Bloom’s: 2. Understand

Difficulty: Medium

Gradable: automatic

Subtopic: The Gas Laws (Boyle, Avogadro, and Charles)

Topic: Gases

  1. A sample of an ideal gas has its volume doubled while its temperature remains constant. If the original pressure was 100 torr, what is the new pressure?
  2. 10 torr
  3. B. 50 torr
  4. 100 torr
  5. 200 torr
  6. 1000 torr

Accessibility: Keyboard Navigation

Bloom’s: 3. Apply

Difficulty: Medium

Gradable: automatic

Subtopic: The Gas Laws (Boyle, Avogadro, and Charles)

Topic: Gases

  1. A sample of the inert gas krypton has its pressure tripled while its temperature remained constant. If the original volume is 12 L, what is the final volume?
  2. A.0 L
  3. 6.0 L
  4. 9 L
  5. 36 L
  6. 48 L

Accessibility: Keyboard Navigation

Bloom’s: 3. Apply

Difficulty: Medium

Gradable: automatic

Subtopic: The Gas Laws (Boyle, Avogadro, and Charles)

Topic: Gases

  1. A weather balloon was initially at a pressure of 0.950 atm, and its volume was 35.0 L. The pressure decreased to 0.750 atm, without loss of gas or change in temperature. What was the change in the volume?
  2. increased by 44.3 L
  3. B. increased by 9.3 L
  4. increased by 7.4 L
  5. decreased by 27.6 L
  6. decreased by 7.4 L

Accessibility: Keyboard Navigation

Bloom’s: 3. Apply

Difficulty: Easy

Gradable: automatic

Subtopic: The Gas Laws (Boyle, Avogadro, and Charles)

Topic: Gases

  1. A sample of nitrogen gas at 298 K and 745 torr has a volume of 37.42 L. What volume will it occupy if the pressure is increased to 894 torr at constant temperature?
  2. 22.3 L
  3. B.2 L
  4. 44.9 L
  5. 112 L
  6. 380 L

Accessibility: Keyboard Navigation

Bloom’s: 3. Apply

Difficulty: Easy

Gradable: automatic

Subtopic: The Gas Laws (Boyle, Avogadro, and Charles)

Topic: Gases

  1. A sample of carbon dioxide gas at 125°C and 248 torr occupies a volume of 275 L. What will the gas pressure be if the volume is increased to 321 L at 125°C?
  2. A. 212 torr
  3. 289 torr
  4. 356 torr
  5. 441 torr
  6. 359 torr

Accessibility: Keyboard Navigation

Bloom’s: 3. Apply

Difficulty: Easy

Gradable: automatic

Subtopic: The Gas Laws (Boyle, Avogadro, and Charles)

Topic: Gases

  1. A sample of oxygen gas has its absolute temperature halved while the pressure of the gas remained constant. If the initial volume is 400 mL, what is the final volume?
  2. 20 mL
  3. 133 mL
  4. C. 200 mL
  5. 400 mL
  6. 800 mL

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Bloom’s: 3. Apply

Difficulty: Medium

Gradable: automatic

Subtopic: The Gas Laws (Boyle, Avogadro, and Charles)

Topic: Gases

  1. A sample container of carbon monoxide occupies a volume of 435 mL at a pressure of 785 torr and a temperature of 298 K. What would its temperature be if the volume were changed to 265 mL at a pressure of 785 torr?
  2. A. 182 K
  3. 298 K
  4. 387 K
  5. 489 K
  6. 538 K

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Bloom’s: 3. Apply

Difficulty: Medium

Gradable: automatic

Subtopic: The Gas Laws (Boyle, Avogadro, and Charles)

Topic: Gases

  1. A 0.850-mole sample of nitrous oxide, a gas used as an anesthetic by dentists, has a volume of 20.46 L at 123°C and 1.35 atm. What would be its volume at 468°C and 1.35 atm?
  2. 5.38 L
  3. 10.9 L
  4. 19.0 L
  5. D.3 L
  6. 77.9 L

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Bloom’s: 3. Apply

Difficulty: Medium

Gradable: automatic

Subtopic: The Gas Laws (Boyle, Avogadro, and Charles)

Topic: Gases

  1. A sample of ammonia gas at 65.5°C and 524 torr has a volume of 15.31 L. What is its volume when the temperature is –15.8°C and its pressure is 524 torr?
  2. 3.69 L
  3. B.6 L
  4. 20.2 L
  5. 63.5 L
  6. not possible, since the volume would have to be negative

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Bloom’s: 3. Apply

Difficulty: Medium

Gradable: automatic

Subtopic: The Gas Laws (Boyle, Avogadro, and Charles)

Topic: Gases

  1. A 500-mL sample of argon at 800 torr has its absolute temperature quadrupled. If the volume remains unchanged what is the new pressure?
  2. 200 torr
  3. 400 torr
  4. 800 torr
  5. 2400 torr
  6. E. 3200 torr

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Bloom’s: 3. Apply

Difficulty: Medium

Gradable: automatic

Subtopic: The Gas Laws (Boyle, Avogadro, and Charles)

Topic: Gases

  1. A 750-mL sample of hydrogen exerts a pressure of 822 torr at 325 K. What pressure does it exert if the temperature is raised to 475 K at constant volume?
  2. 188 torr
  3. 562 torr
  4. 1.11 × 103 torr
  5. D.20 × 103 torr
  6. 1.90 × 103 torr

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Bloom’s: 3. Apply

Difficulty: Medium

Gradable: automatic

Subtopic: The Gas Laws (Boyle, Avogadro, and Charles)

Topic: Gases

  1. A sample of methane gas, CH4(g), occupies a volume of 60.3 L at a pressure of 469 torr and a temperature of 29.3°C. What would be its temperature at a pressure of 243 torr and volume of 60.3 L?
  2. A. –116.5°C
  3. 15.2°C
  4. 15.5°C
  5. 57.7°C
  6. 310.6°C

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Bloom’s: 3. Apply

Difficulty: Medium

Gradable: automatic

Subtopic: The Gas Laws (Boyle, Avogadro, and Charles)

Topic: Gases

  1. What are the conditions of STP?
  2. 0 K and l atm
  3. B.15 K and 760 torr
  4. 0°C and 760 atm
  5. 273.15°C and 760 torr
  6. None of these choices are correct.

Accessibility: Keyboard Navigation

Bloom’s: 1. Remember

Difficulty: Easy

Gradable: automatic

Subtopic: Units of Pressure and STP

Topic: Gases

  1. A sample of propane, a component of LP gas, has a volume of 35.3 L at 315 K and 922 torr. What is its volume at STP?
  2. 25.2 L
  3. 30.6 L
  4. 33.6 L
  5. D.1 L
  6. 49.2 L

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Bloom’s: 3. Apply

Difficulty: Medium

Gradable: automatic

Subtopic: The Ideal Gas Law

Topic: Gases

  1. Nitrogen dioxide is a red-brown gas that is responsible for the color of photochemical smog. A sample of nitrogen dioxide has a volume of 28.6 L at 45.3°C and 89.9 kPa. What is its volume at STP?
  2. A.8 L
  3. 27.6 L
  4. 29.6 L
  5. 37.6 L
  6. 153 L

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Bloom’s: 3. Apply

Difficulty: Medium

Gradable: automatic

Subtopic: The Ideal Gas Law

Topic: Gases

  1. Calculate the pressure of a helium sample at –207.3°C and 768 mL if it exerts a pressure of 175 kPa at 25.0°C and 925 mL.
  2. 32.1 kPa
  3. B.6 kPa
  4. 657 kPa
  5. 953 kPa
  6. not possible, since the pressure would have to be negative

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Bloom’s: 3. Apply

Difficulty: Medium

Gradable: automatic

Subtopic: The Ideal Gas Law

Topic: Gases

  1. Calculate the temperature of an argon sample at 55.4 kPa and 18.6 L if it occupies 25.8 L at 75.0°C and 41.1 kPa.
  2. 95.0°C
  3. 85.1°C
  4. 77.2°C
  5. 72.9°C
  6. E.2°C

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Bloom’s: 3. Apply

Difficulty: Medium

Gradable: automatic

Subtopic: The Ideal Gas Law

Topic: Gases

  1. A carbon dioxide sample weighing 44.0 g occupies 32.68 L at 65°C and 645 torr. What is its volume at STP?
  2. A.4 L
  3. 31.1 L
  4. 34.3 L
  5. 35.2 L
  6. 47.7 L

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Bloom’s: 3. Apply

Difficulty: Medium

Gradable: automatic

Subtopic: The Ideal Gas Law

Topic: Gases

  1. A sample of nitrogen gas is confined to a 14.0 L container at 375 torr and 37.0°C. How many moles of nitrogen are in the container?
  2. A.271 mol
  3. 2.27 mol
  4. 3.69 mol
  5. 206 mol
  6. 227 mol

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Bloom’s: 3. Apply

Difficulty: Easy

Gradable: automatic

Subtopic: The Ideal Gas Law

Topic: Gases

  1. A compressed gas cylinder containing 1.50 mol methane has a volume of 3.30 L. What pressure does the methane exert on the walls of the cylinder if its temperature is 25°C?
  2. 9.00 × 10–2 atm
  3. 0.933 atm
  4. 1.11 atm
  5. 1.70 atm
  6. E.1 atm

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Bloom’s: 3. Apply

Difficulty: Easy

Gradable: automatic

Subtopic: The Ideal Gas Law

Topic: Gases

  1. Assuming ideal behavior, what is the density of argon gas at STP, in g/L?
  2. 0.0176 g/L
  3. 0.0250 g/L
  4. 0.0561 g/L
  5. D.78 g/L
  6. 181. g/L

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Bloom’s: 3. Apply

Difficulty: Medium

Gradable: automatic

Subtopic: Density of a Gas

Topic: Gases

  1. What is the density of carbon dioxide gas at –25.2°C and 98.0 kPa?
  2. 0.232 g/L
  3. 0.279 g/L
  4. 0.994 g/L
  5. 1.74 g/L
  6. E.09 g/L

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Bloom’s: 3. Apply

Difficulty: Medium

Gradable: automatic

Subtopic: Density of a Gas

Topic: Gases

  1. Ima Chemist found the density of Freon-11 (CFCl3) to be 5.58 g/L under her experimental conditions. Her measurements showed that the density of an unknown gas was 4.38 g/L under the same conditions. What is the molar mass of the unknown?
  2. 96.7 g/mol
  3. B. 108 g/mol
  4. 127 g/mol
  5. 165 g/mol
  6. 175 g/mol

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Bloom’s: 3. Apply

Difficulty: Medium

Gradable: automatic

Subtopic: Molar Mass of a Gas

Topic: Gases

  1. A flask with a volume of 3.16 L contains 9.33 grams of an unknown gas at 32.0°C and 1.00 atm. What is the molar mass of the gas?
  2. 7.76 g/mol
  3. 66.1 g/mol
  4. C.0 g/mol
  5. 81.4 g/mol
  6. 144 g/mol

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Bloom’s: 3. Apply

Difficulty: Medium

Gradable: automatic

Subtopic: Molar Mass of a Gas

Topic: Gases

  1. Dr. I. M. A. Brightguy adds 0.1727 g of an unknown gas to a 125-mL flask. If Dr. B finds the pressure to be 736 torr at 20.0°C, is the gas likely to be methane, CH4, nitrogen, N2, oxygen, O2, neon, Ne, or argon, Ar?
  2. CH4
  3. N2
  4. Ne
  5. Ar
  6. E. O2

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Bloom’s: 3. Apply

Difficulty: Medium

Gradable: automatic

Subtopic: Molar Mass of a Gas

Topic: Gases

  1. A 250.0-mL sample of ammonia, NH3(g), exerts a pressure of 833 torr at 42.4°C. What mass of ammonia is in the container?
  2. 0.0787 g
  3. B.180 g
  4. 8.04 g
  5. 17.0 g
  6. 59.8 g

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Bloom’s: 3. Apply

Difficulty: Medium

Gradable: automatic

Subtopic: The Ideal Gas Law

Topic: Gases

  1. What is the pressure in a 7.50-L flask if 0.15 mol of carbon dioxide is added to 0.33 mol of oxygen? The temperature of the mixture is 48.0°C.
  2. 0.252 atm
  3. 0.592 atm
  4. C.69 atm
  5. 3.96 atm
  6. 4.80 atm

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Bloom’s: 3. Apply

Difficulty: Medium

Gradable: automatic

Subtopic: Dalton’s Law of Partial Pressures

Topic: Gases

  1. If 0.750 L of argon at 1.50 atm and 177°C and 0.235 L of sulfur dioxide at 95.0 kPa and 63.0°C are added to a 1.00-L flask and the flask’s temperature is adjusted to 25.0°C, what is the resulting pressure in the flask?
  2. 0.0851 atm
  3. 0.244 atm
  4. C.946 atm
  5. 1.74 atm
  6. 1.86 atm

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Bloom’s: 3. Apply

Difficulty: Hard

Gradable: automatic

Subtopic: Dalton’s Law of Partial Pressures

Topic: Gases

  1. A gas mixture consists of equal masses of methane (molecular weight 16.0) and argon (atomic weight 40.0). If the partial pressure of argon is 200. torr, what is the pressure of methane, in torr?
  2. 80.0 torr
  3. 200. torr
  4. 256 torr
  5. D. torr
  6. 556 torr

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Bloom’s: 3. Apply

Difficulty: Medium

Gradable: automatic

Subtopic: Dalton’s Law of Partial Pressures

Topic: Gases

  1. A gas mixture, with a total pressure of 300. torr, consists of equal masses of Ne (atomic weight 20.) and Ar (atomic weight 40.). What is the partial pressure of Ar, in torr?
  2. 75 torr
  3. B. torr
  4. 150. torr
  5. 200. torr
  6. None of these choices are correct.

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Bloom’s: 3. Apply

Difficulty: Medium

Gradable: automatic

Subtopic: Dalton’s Law of Partial Pressures

Topic: Gases

  1. An unknown liquid is vaporized in a 273-mL flask by immersion in a water bath at 99°C. The barometric pressure is 753 torr. If the mass of the vapor retained in the flask is 1.362 g, what is its molar mass?
  2. 20.4 g/mol
  3. 40.9 g/mol
  4. 112 g/mol
  5. D. 154 g/mol
  6. 184 g/mol

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Bloom’s: 3. Apply

Difficulty: Hard

Gradable: automatic

Subtopic: Molar Mass of a Gas

Topic: Gases

  1. A gas consists of 85.7 percent carbon and 14.3 percent hydrogen, by weight. A sample of this gas weighing 0.673 g occupies 729 mL at a pressure of 720.0 mmHg and a temperature of 77°C. Calculate its empirical and molecular formulas.
  2. CH, C2H2
  3. B. CH2, C2H4
  4. CH2, C3H6
  5. CH3, C2H6
  6. CH4, CH4

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Bloom’s: 3. Apply

Difficulty: Medium

Gradable: automatic

Subtopic: Molar Mass of a Gas

Topic: Gases

  1. Magnesium metal (0.100 mol) and a volume of aqueous hydrochloric acid that contains 0.500 mol of HCl are combined and react to completion. How many liters of hydrogen gas, measured at STP, are produced?

Mg(s) + 2HCl(aq) → MgCl2(aq) + H2(g)

  1. A.24 L of H2
  2. 4.48 L of H2
  3. 5.60 L of H2
  4. 11.2 L of H2
  5. 22.4 L of H2

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Bloom’s: 3. Apply

Difficulty: Medium

Gradable: automatic

Subtopic: Limiting Reactant

Topic: Stoichiometry and Chemical Reactions

  1. Linolenic acid (C18H30O2) can be hydrogenated to stearic acid by reacting it with hydrogen gas according to the equation:

C18H30O2 + 3H2 → C18H36O2

What volume of hydrogen gas, measured at STP, is required to react with 10.5 g of linolenic acid in this reaction?

  1. A.53 L
  2. 1.69 L
  3. 1.27 L
  4. 845 mL
  5. 422 mL

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Bloom’s: 3. Apply

Difficulty: Medium

Gradable: automatic

Subtopic: Calculating Amounts of Reactant and Product (including solutions)

Topic: Stoichiometry and Chemical Reactions

  1. Hydrogen peroxide was catalytically decomposed and 75.3 mL of oxygen gas was collected over water at 25°C and 742 torr. What mass of oxygen was collected? (Pwater = 24 torr at 25°C)
  2. 0.00291 g
  3. B.0931 g
  4. 0.0962 g
  5. 0.0993 g
  6. 0.962 g

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Bloom’s: 3. Apply

Difficulty: Medium

Gradable: automatic

Subtopic: Molar Mass of a Gas

Topic: Gases

  1. Small quantities of hydrogen can be prepared by the addition of hydrochloric acid to zinc. A sample of 195 mL of hydrogen was collected over water at 25°C and 753 torr. What mass of hydrogen was collected? (Pwater = 24 torr at 25°C)
  2. 0.00765 g
  3. B.0154 g
  4. 0.0159 g
  5. 0.0164 g
  6. 0.159 g

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Bloom’s: 3. Apply

Difficulty: Medium

Gradable: automatic

Subtopic: Molar Mass of a Gas

Topic: Gases

  1. Lithium oxide is an effective absorber of carbon dioxide and can be used to purify air in confined areas such as space vehicles. What volume of carbon dioxide can be absorbed by 1.00 kg of lithium oxide at 25°C and 1.00 atm?

Li2O(aq) + CO2(g) → Li2CO3(s)

  1. 687 mL
  2. 819 mL
  3. 687 L
  4. D. 819 L
  5. 22.4 L

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Bloom’s: 3. Apply

Difficulty: Medium

Gradable: automatic

Subtopic: Calculating Amounts of Reactant and Product (including solutions)

Topic: Stoichiometry and Chemical Reactions

  1. Methane, CH4(g), reacts with steam to give synthesis gas, a mixture of carbon monoxide and hydrogen, which is used as starting material for the synthesis of a number of organic and inorganic compounds.

CH4(g) + H2O(g) → CO(g) + H2(g) [unbalanced]

What mass of hydrogen is formed if 275 L of methane (measured at STP) is converted to synthesis gas?

  1. 12.3 g
  2. 24.7 g
  3. 37.1 g
  4. 49.4 g
  5. E.2 g

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Bloom’s: 3. Apply

Difficulty: Hard

Gradable: automatic

Subtopic: Calculating Amounts of Reactant and Product (including solutions)

Topic: Stoichiometry and Chemical Reactions

  1. Hydrochloric acid is prepared by bubbling hydrogen chloride gas through water. What is the concentration of a solution prepared by dissolving 225 L of HCl(g) at 37°C and 89.6 kPa in 5.25 L of water?
  2. A.49 M
  3. 1.66 M
  4. 7.82 M
  5. 12.5 M
  6. 16.6 M

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Bloom’s: 3. Apply

Difficulty: Medium

Gradable: automatic

Subtopic: The Ideal Gas Law

Topic: Gases

  1. Which of the following gases effuses most rapidly?
  2. Nitrogen
  3. Oxygen
  4. Hydrogen chloride
  5. D. Ammonia
  6. Carbon monoxide

Accessibility: Keyboard Navigation

Bloom’s: 2. Understand

Difficulty: Easy

Gradable: automatic

Subtopic: Effusion and Diffusion (Graham’s Law)

Topic: Gases

  1. Which of the following gases will be the slowest to diffuse through a room?
  2. methane, CH4
  3. hydrogen sulfide, H2S
  4. C. carbon dioxide, CO2
  5. water, H2O
  6. neon, Ne

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Bloom’s: 2. Understand

Difficulty: Easy

Gradable: automatic

Subtopic: Effusion and Diffusion (Graham’s Law)

Topic: Gases

  1. Arrange the following gases in order of increasing rate of effusion.

C2H6            Ar            HCl         PH3

  1. A. Ar < HCl < PH3 < C2H6
  2. C2H6 < PH3 < HCl < Ar
  3. Ar < PH3 < C2H6 < HCl
  4. C2H6 < HCl < PH3 < Ar
  5. Ar < PH3< HCl < C2H6

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Bloom’s: 2. Understand

Difficulty: Easy

Gradable: automatic

Subtopic: Effusion and Diffusion (Graham’s Law)

Topic: Gases

  1. A 3.0-L sample of helium was placed in a container fitted with a porous membrane. Half of the helium effused through the membrane in 24 hours. A 3.0-L sample of oxygen was placed in an identical container. How many hours will it take for half of the oxygen to effuse through the membrane?
  2. 8.5 h
  3. 12 h
  4. 48 h
  5. 60. h
  6. E. 68 h

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Bloom’s: 3. Apply

Difficulty: Medium

Gradable: automatic

Subtopic: Effusion and Diffusion (Graham’s Law)

Topic: Gases

  1. A compound composed of carbon, hydrogen, and chlorine effuses through a pinhole 0.411 times as fast as neon. Select the correct molecular formula for the compound.
  2. A. CHCl3
  3. CH2Cl2
  4. C2H2Cl2
  5. C2H3Cl
  6. CCl4

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Bloom’s: 3. Apply

Difficulty: Medium

Gradable: automatic

Subtopic: Effusion and Diffusion (Graham’s Law)

Topic: Gases

  1. The volume of a single molecule of water is 2.99 × 10–23 mL. For a sample of gaseous water at 1.00 atm and 150°C, what fraction of the container’s volume is occupied by the molecules themselves?
  2. 5.2 × 10–7
  3. 4.5 × 10–5
  4. C.2 × 10–4
  5. 5.2 × 10–1
  6. None of these choices are correct.

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Bloom’s: 3. Apply

Difficulty: Medium

Gradable: automatic

Subtopic: Deviation From Ideal Behavior (van der Waals Equation)

Topic: Gases

  1. Helium gas is being pumped into a rigid container at a constant temperature. As a result, the pressure of helium in the container is increasing. Select the one correct statement below.
  2. As the pressure increases, helium atoms move faster, on average.
  3. As the pressure increases, helium atoms move more slowly, on average.
  4. As the pressure increases, the volume of the container must decrease.
  5. As the pressure increases, helium atoms stay closer to the wall of the container, on average.
  6. E. As the pressure increases, there are more collisions of helium atoms with the container wall.

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Bloom’s: 2. Understand

Difficulty: Easy

Gradable: automatic

Subtopic: Kinetic-Molecular Theory

Topic: Gases

  1. Which of the following changes will not affect the total pressure of gas in a container, assuming all other factors remain constant?
  2. The frequency of collisions of molecules with the walls is increased.
  3. The average velocity of the molecules is lowered.
  4. The temperature of the sample is altered.
  5. D. Half of the molecules are replaced by an equal number of molecules of a gas with a different molecular weight.
  6. The total number of molecules is altered.

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Bloom’s: 2. Understand

Difficulty: Medium

Gradable: automatic

Subtopic: Kinetic-Molecular Theory

Topic: Gases

  1. Select the statement that does not apply to an ideal gas.
  2. There are no attractive forces between the gas molecules.
  3. B. There are strong repulsive forces between the gas molecules.
  4. The volume occupied by the molecules is negligible compared to the container volume.
  5. The gas behaves according to the ideal gas equation.
  6. The average kinetic energy of the molecules is proportional to the absolute temperature.

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Bloom’s: 1. Remember

Difficulty: Easy

Gradable: automatic

Subtopic: Kinetic-Molecular Theory

Topic: Gases

  1. At what temperature in kelvin is the root mean square speed of helium atoms (atomic weight = 4.00) equal to that of oxygen molecules (molecular weight = 32.00) at 300. K?
  2. A.5 K
  3. 75 K
  4. 106 K
  5. 292 K
  6. 2400. K

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Bloom’s: 3. Apply

Difficulty: Hard

Gradable: automatic

Subtopic: Kinetic Energy and Temperature (Root-Mean-Square Speed)

Topic: Gases

  1. Select the gas with the highest average kinetic energy per mole at 298 K.
  2. O2
  3. CO2
  4. H2O
  5. H2
  6. E. All have the same average kinetic energy.

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Bloom’s: 2. Understand

Difficulty: Medium

Gradable: automatic

Subtopic: Kinetic Energy and Temperature (Root-Mean-Square Speed)

Topic: Gases

  1. The most probable speed of an oxygen molecule in the gas phase at room temperature is 450 m/s. The root-mean-square speed (urms) is therefore
  2. equal to 450 m/s.
  3. slightly less than 450 m/s.
  4. much less than 450 m/s.
  5. D. slightly greater than 450 m/s.
  6. much greater than 450 m/s.

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Bloom’s: 3. Apply

Difficulty: Medium

Gradable: automatic

Subtopic: Kinetic Energy and Temperature (Root-Mean-Square Speed)

Topic: Gases

  1. Select the gas with the largest root-mean-square molecular speed at 25°C.
  2. NH3
  3. CO
  4. C. H2
  5. SF6
  6. All the gases have the same root-mean-square molecular speed at 25°C.

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Bloom’s: 2. Understand

Difficulty: Medium

Gradable: automatic

Subtopic: Kinetic Energy and Temperature (Root-Mean-Square Speed)

Topic: Gases

  1. Calculate the root-mean-square speed of methane, CH4 (g), at 78°C.
  2. 23 m/s
  3. 350 m/s
  4. 550 m/s
  5. 667 m/s
  6. E. 740 m/s

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Bloom’s: 3. Apply

Difficulty: Medium

Gradable: automatic

Subtopic: Kinetic Energy and Temperature (Root-Mean-Square Speed)

Topic: Gases

  1. Freon-12, CF2Cl2, which has been widely used in air conditioning systems, is considered a threat to the ozone layer in the stratosphere. Calculate the root-mean-square velocity of Freon-12 molecules in the lower stratosphere where the temperature is –65°C.
  2. 20 m/s
  3. 120 m/s
  4. C. 210 m/s
  5. 260 m/s
  6. 4.4 × 104 m/s

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Bloom’s: 3. Apply

Difficulty: Medium

Gradable: automatic

Subtopic: Kinetic Energy and Temperature (Root-Mean-Square Speed)

Topic: Gases

  1. Calculate the rms speed of carbon dioxide molecules at STP.
  2. 12.4 m/s
  3. 155 m/s
  4. C. 393 m/s
  5. 1.55 × 105 m/s
  6. The answer can’t be calculated without more data.

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Bloom’s: 3. Apply

Difficulty: Medium

Gradable: automatic

Subtopic: Kinetic Energy and Temperature (Root-Mean-Square Speed)

Topic: Gases

  1. If the molecular mass of a gas increases by a factor of 4 at constant temperature, its rms speed will
  2. decrease by a factor of 4.
  3. increase by a factor of 4.
  4. decrease by a factor of 16.
  5. increase by a factor of 16.
  6. E. decrease by a factor of 2.

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Bloom’s: 3. Apply

Difficulty: Medium

Gradable: automatic

Subtopic: Kinetic Energy and Temperature (Root-Mean-Square Speed)

Topic: Gases

  1. The temperature of the carbon dioxide atmosphere near the surface of Venus is 475°C. Calculate the average kinetic energy per mole of carbon dioxide molecules on Venus.
  2. 2520 J/mol
  3. 4150 J/mol
  4. 5920 J/mol
  5. D. 9330 J/mol
  6. 5920 kJ/mol

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Bloom’s: 3. Apply

Difficulty: Medium

Gradable: automatic

Subtopic: Kinetic Energy and Temperature (Root-Mean-Square Speed)

Topic: Gases

  1. The ozone layer is important because
  2. ozone absorbs low energy radiation which warms the troposphere.
  3. ozone purifies the atmosphere by reacting with excess fluorocarbons.
  4. C. ozone absorbs ultraviolet radiation.
  5. ozone reflects high energy radiation such as X-rays and gamma rays.
  6. humans need to breathe air containing some ozone.

Accessibility: Keyboard Navigation

Bloom’s: 1. Remember

Difficulty: Easy

Gradable: automatic

Subtopic: Atmospheric Chemistry

Topic: Environmental Chemistry

  1. Nitrogen will behave most like an ideal gas
  2. at high temperature and high pressure.
  3. B. at high temperature and low pressure.
  4. at low temperature and high pressure.
  5. at low temperature and low pressure.
  6. at intermediate (moderate) temperature and pressure.

Accessibility: Keyboard Navigation

Bloom’s: 1. Remember

Difficulty: Easy

Gradable: automatic

Subtopic: Deviation From Ideal Behavior (van der Waals Equation)

Topic: Gases

  1. The ideal gas law tends to become inaccurate when
  2. the pressure is lowered and molecular interactions become significant.
  3. B. the pressure is raised and the temperature is lowered.
  4. the temperature is raised above the temperature of STP.
  5. large gas samples are involved.
  6. the volume expands beyond the standard molar volume.

Accessibility: Keyboard Navigation

Bloom’s: 1. Remember

Difficulty: Easy

Gradable: automatic

Subtopic: Deviation From Ideal Behavior (van der Waals Equation)

Topic: Gases

  1. Use the van der Waals equation for real gases to calculate the pressure exerted by 1.00 mole of ammonia at 27°C in a 750-mL container. (a = 4.17 L2·atm/mol2, b = 0.0371 L/mol)
  2. 23.2 atm
  3. B.1 atm
  4. 32.8 atm
  5. 42.0 atm
  6. 32.8 torr

Accessibility: Keyboard Navigation

Bloom’s: 3. Apply

Difficulty: Hard

Gradable: automatic

Subtopic: Deviation From Ideal Behavior (van der Waals Equation)

Topic: Gases

  1. At moderate pressures (~ 200 atm), the measured pressure exerted by CO2 gas is less than that predicted by the ideal gas equation. This is mainly because
  2. such high pressures cannot be accurately measured.
  3. CO2 will condense to a liquid at 200 atm pressure.
  4. gas phase collisions prevent CO2 molecules from colliding with the walls of the container.
  5. D. of attractive intermolecular forces between CO2
  6. the volume occupied by the CO2 molecules themselves becomes significant.

Accessibility: Keyboard Navigation

Bloom’s: 1. Remember

Difficulty: Medium

Gradable: automatic

Subtopic: Deviation From Ideal Behavior (van der Waals Equation)

Topic: Gases

  1. At very high pressures (~ 1000 atm), the measured pressure exerted by real gases is greater than that predicted by the ideal gas equation. This is mainly because
  2. such high pressures cannot be accurately measured.
  3. real gases will condense to form liquids at 1000 atm pressure.
  4. gas phase collisions prevent molecules from colliding with the walls of the container.
  5. of attractive intermolecular forces between gas molecules.
  6. E. the volume occupied by the gas molecules themselves becomes significant.

Accessibility: Keyboard Navigation

Bloom’s: 1. Remember

Difficulty: Medium

Gradable: automatic

Subtopic: Deviation From Ideal Behavior (van der Waals Equation)

Topic: Gases

  1. When a closed-ended manometer is used for pressure measurements, and the closed end is under vacuum, the level of manometer liquid in the closed arm can never be lower than that in the other arm.

TRUE

Accessibility: Keyboard Navigation

Bloom’s: 1. Remember

Difficulty: Easy

Gradable: automatic

Subtopic: Units of Pressure and STP

Topic: Gases

  1. For a gas obeying Boyle’s Law, a plot of V versus 1/P will give a straight line passing through the origin.

TRUE

Accessibility: Keyboard Navigation

Bloom’s: 2. Understand

Difficulty: Medium

Gradable: automatic

Subtopic: The Gas Laws (Boyle, Avogadro, and Charles)

Topic: Gases

  1. For a gas obeying Charles’s Law, a plot of V versus 1/T will give a straight line passing through the origin.

FALSE

Accessibility: Keyboard Navigation

Bloom’s: 2. Understand

Difficulty: Medium

Gradable: automatic

Subtopic: The Gas Laws (Boyle, Avogadro, and Charles)

Topic: Gases

  1. At a temperature of absolute zero, the volume of an ideal gas is zero.

TRUE

Accessibility: Keyboard Navigation

Bloom’s: 1. Remember

Difficulty: Easy

Gradable: automatic

Subtopic: The Gas Laws (Boyle, Avogadro, and Charles)

Topic: Gases

  1. According to the postulates of kinetic-molecular theory, the molecules of all gases at a given temperature have the same average speed.

FALSE

Accessibility: Keyboard Navigation

Bloom’s: 1. Remember

Difficulty: Medium

Gradable: automatic

Subtopic: Kinetic Energy and Temperature (Root-Mean-Square Speed)

Topic: Gases

  1. According to the postulates of kinetic-molecular theory, the molecules of all gases at a given temperature have the same average kinetic energy.

TRUE

Accessibility: Keyboard Navigation

Bloom’s: 1. Remember

Difficulty: Easy

Gradable: automatic

Subtopic: Kinetic Energy and Temperature (Root-Mean-Square Speed)

Topic: Gases

  1. According to the kinetic theory of gases, in a collision between two molecules the kinetic energy of one molecule will decrease by the same amount that the kinetic energy of the other one increases.

TRUE

Accessibility: Keyboard Navigation

Bloom’s: 1. Remember

Difficulty: Easy

Gradable: automatic

Subtopic: Kinetic-Molecular Theory

Topic: Gases

  1. According to the postulates of kinetic-molecular theory, the average kinetic energy of gas molecules is proportional to the absolute temperature.

TRUE

Accessibility: Keyboard Navigation

Bloom’s: 1. Remember

Difficulty: Easy

Gradable: automatic

Subtopic: Kinetic Energy and Temperature (Root-Mean-Square Speed)

Topic: Gases

  1. For a pure gas sample, the average kinetic energy is also the most probable kinetic energy.

FALSE

Accessibility: Keyboard Navigation

Bloom’s: 1. Remember

Difficulty: Medium

Gradable: automatic

Subtopic: Kinetic Energy and Temperature (Root-Mean-Square Speed)

Topic: Gases

  1. The rate of diffusion of a gas is inversely proportional to its molar mass.

FALSE

Accessibility: Keyboard Navigation

Bloom’s: 1. Remember

Difficulty: Medium

Gradable: automatic

Subtopic: Effusion and Diffusion (Graham’s Law)

Topic: Gases

  1. For an ideal gas, a plot of PV/nRT versus P gives a straight line with a positive slope.

FALSE

Accessibility: Keyboard Navigation

Bloom’s: 2. Understand

Difficulty: Medium

Gradable: automatic

Subtopic: The Ideal Gas Law

Topic: Gases

  1. For real gases, PV > nRT, always.

FALSE

Accessibility: Keyboard Navigation

Bloom’s: 1. Remember

Difficulty: Medium

Gradable: automatic

Subtopic: Deviation From Ideal Behavior (van der Waals Equation)

Topic: Gases

  1. For real gases, PV < nRT, always.

FALSE

Accessibility: Keyboard Navigation

Bloom’s: 1. Remember

Difficulty: Medium

Gradable: automatic

Subtopic: Deviation From Ideal Behavior (van der Waals Equation)

Topic: Gases

  1. Convert a gas pressure of 485 cmHg to atmospheres.
  2. 0.64 atm
  3. 33.0 atm
  4. C.38 atm
  5. 5.50 atm
  6. 6.46 atm

Accessibility: Keyboard Navigation

Bloom’s: 3. Apply

Difficulty: Easy

Gradable: automatic

Subtopic: Units of Pressure and STP

Topic: Stoichiometry and Chemical Reactions

 

Category                                                                                                                                        # of Questions

Accessibility: Keyboard Navigation                                                                                                                        94

Bloom’s: 1. Remember                                                                                                                                            23

Bloom’s: 2. Understand                                                                                                                                           15

Bloom’s: 3. Apply                                                                                                                                                   60

Difficulty: Easy                                                                                                                                                       33

Difficulty: Hard                                                                                                                                                       5

Difficulty: Medium                                                                                                                                                  60

Gradable: automatic                                                                                                                                                 98

Subtopic: Atmospheric Chemistry                                                                                                                           1

Subtopic: Calculating Amounts of Reactant and Product (including solutions)                                                       3

Subtopic: Dalton’s Law of Partial Pressures                                                                                                           5

Subtopic: Density of a Gas                                                                                                                                      2

Subtopic: Deviation From Ideal Behavior (van der Waals Equation)                                                                      8

Subtopic: Effusion and Diffusion (Graham’s Law)                                                                                                7

Subtopic: Kinetic Energy and Temperature (Root-Mean-Square Speed)                                                                 13

Subtopic: Kinetic-Molecular Theory                                                                                                                        4

Subtopic: Limiting Reactant                                                                                                                                     1

Subtopic: Molar Mass of a Gas                                                                                                                               7

Subtopic: The Gas Laws (Boyle, Avogadro, and Charles)                                                                                      23

Subtopic: The Ideal Gas Law                                                                                                                                  10

Subtopic: Units of Pressure and STP                                                                                                                      14

Topic: Environmental Chemistry                                                                                                                             1

Topic: Gases                                                                                                                                                            92

Topic: Stoichiometry and Chemical Reactions                                                                                                         5

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