Our Society Human Diversity in Canada 4th Edition by Paul U. Angelini – Test Bank

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Our Society Human Diversity in Canada 4th Edition by Paul U. Angelini – Test Bank

Sample Questions

 

 

CHAPTER 3

Social Inequity and Stratification in Canada

Eddie Grattan

 

Chapter Summary

 

This chapter has examined several aspects of social inequality in Canada.  For one, the chapter presents that there is inequality of income and wealth in our society. Although both income and wealth are unequally distributed, historically inequality of wealth has exhibited greater extremes. Two major theories, structural functionalism and conflict theory provide insight into the nature of social inequality, although neither is without problems.

 

That social inequality pervades nearly all aspects of our lives is also explored in this chapter. Social class, race and ethnicity, sex, age, and physical and mental ability all have an impact on social inequality.  Additionally, this chapter explains that Canada has four major social classes (three, if working and subworking classes are combined).

 

Lastly, this chapter on social inequality and stratification presents that, in recent years, structural changes in the global economy have increased social inequality in Canada and elsewhere, and predicts that this looks likely to continue in the future.

 

 

Chapter 3 Social Inequity and Stratification in Canada

 

 

TEST BANK QUESTIONS

 

MULTIPLE CHOICE

 

  1. What kind of society is Canada?
a. caste
b. communist
c. stratified
d. traditional

 

ANS:   C

REF:    p. 66

 

  1. What is income?
a. the money left in a will
b. the money left over after taxes
c. the money you receive from weekly wages
d. the flow of money received over a specified period of time

 

ANS:   D

REF:    p. 66

 

  1. What is wealth?
a. investment income
b. the assets left for a person in a will
c. the accumulation of income a person earns over a lifetime
d. the accumulation of assets, such as a house, car, savings, cottage, and land

 

ANS:   D

REF:    p. 71

 

  1. Which of the following factors is strongly associated with social inequality?
a. height
b. weight
c. attitude
d. social background

 

ANS:   D

REF:    p. 75

 

 

  1. What was the average after-tax income of Canadian families in 2007?
a. 45 300
b. 59 500
c. 71 900
d. 95 300

 

ANS:   C

REF:    p. 68

 

  1. In 2007, what did the lowest 20 percent of income-earners in Canada earn?
a. 1 percent of total income
b. 4 percent of total income
c. 7 percent of total income
d. 15 percent of total income

 

ANS:   B

REF:    p. 69

 

  1. In 2007, what did the highest 20 percent of income-earners in Canada earn?
a. 20 percent of total income
b. 27 percent of total income
c. 46 percent of total income
d. 55 percent of total income

 

ANS:   A

REF:    p. 70

 

  1. In 2005, what did the lowest 20 percent of family units in Canada own?
a. 0.1 percent of total net worth
b. 1 percent of total net worth
c. 5 percent of total net worth
d. 20 percent of total net worth

 

ANS:   A

REF:    p. 71

 

  1. From 1999 to 2005, what happened to the median net worth of the lowest quintile?
a. It dropped by 9.1 percent.
b. It dropped by 3.6 percent.
c. It increased by 2.5 percent.
d. It increased by 7 percent.

 

ANS:   A

REF:    p. 72

 

 

  1. Which of the following is not an ascribed status?
a. sex
b. ethnicity
c. attitude
d. social background

 

ANS:   C

REF:    pp. 73-78

 

  1. Who did Karl Marx consider to be the players in society’s major conflict? The capitalist class and middle class
a. the capitalist class and the working class
b. the capitalist class and the bourgeoisie
c. the working class and the middle class
d. the working class and the middle class

 

ANS:   B

REF:    p. 81

 

  1. According to Marx, what is exploitation related to?
a. the legal age of employment
b. the political role of the workers
c. the level of wages
d. the amount of surplus value

 

ANS:   B

REF:    p. 82

 

  1. What did Max Weber write about?
a. social class and status groups
b. inequality as stemming only from property ownership
c. the proletariat as the dominant class
d. the coming communist revolution

 

ANS:   A

REF:    pp. 81-82

 

  1. Of the options below, which makes up about 4 to 5 percent of the Canadian population?
a. middle class
b. upper class
c. working class
d. subworking class

 

ANS:   B

REF:    p. 86

 

 

  1. Which of the following is an important element of upward social mobility?
a. income
b. sex
c. age
d. education

 

ANS:   D

REF:    p. 89

 

TRUE/FALSE

 

  1. Inequality exists in all societies.

 

ANS: T

REF: p. 66

 

  1. Income is defined as the property a person possesses.

 

ANS: F

REF: p. 67

 

  1. There is a close relationship between income and wealth.

 

ANS: T

REF: p. 71

 

  1. Our ascribed statuses can restrict our ability to achieve our goals.

 

ANS: T

REF: p. 73

 

  1. Structural–functionalists consider inequality inevitable and natural.

 

ANS: T

REF: p. 79

 

  1. Marx argued that all societies would move smoothly toward communism.

 

ANS: F

REF: pp. 82-83

 

  1. Weber argued that property ownership was irrelevant to a society’s functioning.

 

ANS: F

REF: p. 85

 

 

  1. The size of Canada’s working class is insignificant.

 

ANS: F

REF: p. 87

 

  1. Working-class people tend to possess relatively little wealth.

 

ANS: T

REF: p. 87

 

  1. Most middle-class people have a private education.

 

ANS: F

REF: p. 87

 

SHORT ANSWER

 

  1. Describe the differences between income and wealth, and how income and wealth are related.

 

ANS: Answers will vary

 

  1. Describe the class structure of Canada.

 

ANS: Answers will vary

 

  1. Compare and contrast the theories of structural–functionalism and conflict theory.

 

ANS: Answers will vary

 

  1. What is an ascribed status? List the main ascribed statuses.

 

ANS: Answers will vary

 

  1. What are some of the problems structural–functionalism has in explaining income and wealth inequality?

 

ANS: Answers will vary

 

ESSAY QUESTIONS

 

  1. Using Statistics Canada, find data on the average total income for families in two provinces. Explain why the averages may be different.

 

ANS: Answers will vary

 

  1. In what ways does a person’s social background influence his or her life chances?

 

ANS: Answers will vary

 

  1. Compare the class structure of Canada with that of Great Britain. What are the major similarities and differences?

 

ANS: Answers will vary

 

  1. Summarize Marx’s theory of inequality. Do you agree or disagree with Marx? Explain.

 

ANS: Answers will vary

 

  1. Income and wealth inequality have increased in recent years. What factors explain this increase?

 

ANS: Answers will vary

 

 

 

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