The Art of Public Speaking, 11th Edition by Stephen Lucas – Test Bank

$25.00

Category:

Description

INSTANT DOWNLOAD WITH ANSWERS
The Art of Public Speaking, 11th Edition by Stephen Lucas – Test Bank

 

 

  2

 

Ethics and Public
Speaking

 

 

 

 

T

he questions for each chapter are organized according to type: true-false, multiple-choice, short-answer, and essay. Within each of these categories, questions are clustered by topic, roughly following the order of topics in the textbook.

To provide as much flexibility as possible in constructing examinations, there is deliberate overlap among the questions, both within and across question types. This enables you to choose the wording and question type that best fits your testing objectives. In deciding which questions to use, take care to avoid items such as a multiple-choice question that gives away the answer to a true-false or short-answer question, or an essay question that covers essentially the same ground as a true-false, short-answer, or multiple-choice question.

Each type of question—true-false, multiple-choice, short-answer, and essay—has an automatic numbering system, which means you can copy and paste items from within a question type, and they will automatically number themselves consecutively, beginning with “1.” The five answer choices for each multiple-choice question are also ordered automatically, and so you can add, change, or reorder answer choices without rearranging the lettering.

If you would like to preserve the fonts, indents, and tabs of the original questions, you can substitute questions for those in the sample final exams or copy and paste questions into the Exam Master provided in the final Word file of the Test Bank. In the Exam Master, spaces for your course name, exam type, and the student’s name and section are followed by headings and instructions for true-false, multiple-choice, short-answer, and essay questions. You can add elements unique to your exams and delete elements you don’t want to use. After you customize the Exam Master, you can save it with your changes. Then, each time you open it, click “Save As” to give it the name of the exam you are currently constructing.

 

True-False Questions

  1. T F      The aim of an ethical speaker is to accomplish his or her goals by any means necessary.
  2. T F      Ethics is the branch of philosophy that deals with issues of right and wrong in human affairs.
  3. T F      Ethical issues can arise at every stage of the speechmaking process.
  4. T F      The ethical obligation of a speaker to be fully prepared increases as the size of the audience increases.
  5. T F      A public speaker need only be concerned about ethics in the conclusion of a speech.
  6. T F      The first responsibility of a speaker is to make sure her or his goal is ethically sound.
  7. T F      A speaker’s ethical obligations decrease as the size of the audience decreases.
  8. T F      As the Roman rhetorician Quintilian noted 2,000 years ago, the ideal of speechmaking is to persuade the audience by any means necessary.
  9. T F      As the Roman rhetorician Quintilian noted 2,000 years ago, the ideal of speechmaking is the good person speaking well.
  10. T F      Because persuasion is such a complex process, juggling statistics and quoting out of context to maximize your persuasive effect are ethically acceptable in speeches to persuade.
  11. T F      As long as the goal of your speech is ethically sound, it is acceptable to use any means necessary to achieve your goal.
  12. T F      Ethical decisions need to be justified against a set of standards or criteria.
  13. T F      Sound ethical decisions involve weighing a potential course of action against a set of ethical standards or guidelines.
  14. T F      Because ethical decisions are complex, ethical choices are simply a matter of personal preference.
  15. T F      As your textbook explains, ethical decisions are essentially a matter of personal whim or opinion.
  16. T F      You have an ethical obligation to make sure the information you present in your speeches is accurate.
  17. T F      It is true, as the old adage says, that “sticks and stones can break my bones, but words can never hurt me.”
  18. T F      As your textbook explains, the ethical obligation of a speaker to avoid name-calling and other forms of abusive language is essentially a matter of political correctness.
  19. T F      Avoiding sexist, racist, and other kinds of abusive language is important primarily as a matter of political correctness.
  20. T F      If something is legal, it is also ethical.
  21. T F      Name-calling is ethical in public speaking because it is protected by the First Amendment to the Constitution.
  22. T F      Public speakers need to take their ethical responsibilities as seriously as their strategic objectives.
  23. T F      Because the aim of speechmaking is to secure a desired response from listeners, speakers need to give their strategic objectives priority over their ethical obligations.
  24. T F      Unlike writers, public speakers can present other people’s ideas as their own without being guilty of plagiarism.
  25. T F      Global plagiarism occurs when a speaker takes material from several different sources and presents it as his or her own.
  26. T F      Taking someone’s entire speech and passing it off as your own is a form of unethical behavior called global plagiarism.
  27. T F      Copying passages from a few sources and stringing them together to make a speech is a form of unethical behavior called patchwork plagiarism.
  28. T F      One of the best ways to avoid falling into the trap of plagiarism is to start work on your speeches well before they are due.
  29. T F      It is necessary for a public speaker to identify his or her source whether the speaker is paraphrasing or quoting verbatim.
  30. T F      It is only necessary to identify your source in a speech when you are quoting directly, rather than paraphrasing.
  31. T F      Whenever you quote someone directly in a speech, you must attribute the words to that person.
  32. T F      When you paraphrase someone in a speech, you have an ethical responsibility to give that person credit for his or her ideas.
  33. T F      Incremental plagiarism occurs when a speaker uses quotations or paraphrases without citing the sources of the statements.
  34. T F      Just as you need to give credit to the authors of print books and articles that you quote or paraphrase in your speech, so you need to give credit to the authors of Internet documents.
  35. T F      If a Web page is not copyright protected, then it is ethical to cut and paste sections of the page into your speech without citing your source.
  36. T F      Because opinions on the Internet are free for anyone to use, it is ethical to use them in your speech without citing your source.
  37. T F      When citing an Internet document in a speech, it is usually sufficient to introduce it by saying, “As I found on the Internet.”
  38. T F      Just as public speakers have ethical responsibilities, so too do the people who listen to a speech.
  39. T F      As a matter of ethics, audience members should listen attentively to and agree with everything a speaker says.
  40. T F      The ethical obligation of an audience to listen to a speaker courteously and attentively is less important in speech class than for speeches outside the classroom.
  41. T F      All statements made by a public speaker are protected under the free speech clause of the First Amendment to the U.S. Constitution.
  42. T F      It is possible to disagree entirely with a speaker’s ideas but still support the speaker’s right to express those ideas.
  43. T F      No matter how well intentioned they may be, efforts to protect society by restricting free speech usually end up repressing minority viewpoints and unpopular opinions.

 

Multiple-Choice Questions    (Students are to indicate the best answer for each question by circling the correct letter.)

  1. Speechmaking is a form of power and therefore carries with it heavy __________ responsibilities.
  2. logical
  3. ethical
  4. psychological
  5. emotional
  6. sociological
  7. As your textbook makes clear, speechmaking carries heavy ethical responsibilities because it is a form of
  8. power.
  9. self-expression.
  10. Because speechmaking is a form of power, we must always be sure to speak
  11. According to your textbook, the branch of philosophy that deals with human issues of right and wrong is termed
  12. As a public speaker, you face ethical issues when
  13. selecting the topic for your speech.
  14. researching your speech.
  15. organizing your speech.
  16. all of the above.
  17. a and b only.
  18. In public speaking, sound ethical decisions involve weighing a potential course of action against
  19. the frame of reference of the audience.
  20. a set of ethical guidelines or standards.
  21. the speaker’s strategic objectives.
  22. a socially accepted code of legal rules.
  23. the personal opinions of the speaker.
  24. In public speaking, sound ethical decisions involve weighing a potential course of action against
  25. the persuasive goals of the speaker.
  26. an interpretation of the U.S. Constitution.
  27. the frame of reference of the audience.
  28. a set of ethical guidelines or standards.
  29. the majority views of public opinion.
  30. Which of the following is presented in your textbook as a guideline for ethical speechmaking?
  31. Be fully prepared for each speech.
  32. Explain your credibility in the introduction.
  33. Present your main points in nontechnical language.
  34. Use visual aids to clarify statistical trends.
  35. Be alert to feedback from the audience.
  36. Which of the following is presented in your textbook as a guideline for ethical speechmaking?
  37. Explain your motives for speaking.
  38. Cite your sources in the introduction.
  39. Make sure your goals are ethically sound.
  40. all of the above
  41. a and c only
  42. Which of the following is presented in your textbook as a guideline for ethical speechmaking?
  43. Put ethical principles into practice.
  44. Adapt to the audience’s frame of reference.
  45. Make sure your goals are ethically sound.
  46. all of the above
  47. a and c only

 

 

  1. All of the following are presented in your textbook as guidelines for ethical speechmaking except
  2. Be honest in what you say.
  3. Avoid name calling and other forms of abusive language.
  4. Be fully prepared for each speech.
  5. Make sure your goals are ethically sound.
  6. Explain your credibility on the speech topic.
  7. Which of the following are included in your textbook as guidelines for ethical speechmaking?
  8. Make sure your goals are ethically sound, stay within your time limits, and practice your speech delivery.
  9. Be honest in what you say, be fully prepared for each speech, and make sure your goals are ethically sound.
  10. Avoid global plagiarism, use quotations rather than paraphrases, and put your ethical principals into practice.
  11. Be fully prepared for each speech, avoid name-calling, and stay within your time limits.
  12. Establish your credibility, be honest in what you say, and put your ethical principles into practice.
  13. All of the following are presented in your textbook as guidelines for ethical speechmaking except
  14. Explain your motives for speaking to the audience.
  15. Put your ethical principles into practice.
  16. Avoid name-calling and other forms of abusive language.
  17. Make sure your goals are ethically sound.
  18. Be fully prepared for each speech.
  19. All of the following are presented in your textbook as guidelines for ethical speechmaking except
  20. Be fully prepared for each speech.
  21. Make sure your goals are ethically sound.
  22. Avoid name-calling and other forms of abusive language.
  23. Respect your listeners’ frame of reference.
  24. Put your ethical principles into practice.
  25. For his informative speech, Douglas told his classmates how to get free food at a drive-through restaurant. Rather than focusing on legitimate deals, such as student discounts or coupons, Douglas talked about ways to trick employees into believing you had already paid for food when you had not. His instructor gave the speech a poor grade because it violated the ethical criteria for public speaking presented in your textbook. The guideline Douglas violated was:
  26. Be fully prepared for each speech.
  27. Make sure your goals are ethically sound.
  28. Avoid name-calling and other forms of abusive language.
  29. Adapt to your audience’s frame of reference.
  30. Avoid plagiarism.
  31. Having spent two years working in a television newsroom, Madison decided to give her informative speech on that topic. Because she knew a lot about it and was comfortable speaking to an audience, she didn’t spend much time preparing. As a result, her speech was poorly organized, ran overtime, and did not have a clear message. Which guideline for ethical public speaking discussed in your textbook did Madison fail to live up to?
  32. Be fully prepared for each speech.
  33. Make sure your goals are ethically sound.
  34. Avoid name-calling and other forms of abusive language.
  35. Be honest in what you say.
  36. Avoid plagiarism.
  37. As explained in your textbook, public speakers have an ethical obligation to avoid name-calling and other forms of abusive language because such language
  38. demeans the dignity of the groups or individuals being attacked.
  39. violates current standards of political correctness on college campuses.
  40. undermines the right of all groups in the U.S. to express their ideas.
  41. all of the above.
  42. a and c only.
  43. As explained in your textbook, public speakers have an ethical obligation to avoid name-calling and other forms of abusive language because such language
  44. violates the Bill of Rights in the U.S. Constitution.
  45. demeans the dignity of the groups or individuals being attacked.
  46. undermines the right of all groups in the U.S. to express their ideas.
  47. all of the above.
  48. b and c only.
  49. As explained in your textbook, public speakers have an ethical obligation to avoid name-calling and other forms of abusive language because such language
  50. is forbidden by the first amendment to the U.S. Constitution.
  51. violates current standards of political correctness on college campuses.
  52. changes meaning based on the frame of reference of the audience.
  53. is used by speakers who are not fully prepared for their presentations.
  54. demeans the personal dignity of the groups or individuals being attacked.
  55. The three kinds of plagiarism discussed in your textbook are
  56. universal plagiarism, incremental plagiarism, and accidental plagiarism.
  57. essential plagiarism, incidental plagiarism, and global plagiarism.
  58. literary plagiarism, scientific plagiarism, and speech plagiarism.
  59. idea plagiarism, quotation plagiarism, and paraphrase plagiarism.
  60. global plagiarism, patchwork plagiarism, and incremental plagiarism.
  61. Which of the following is recommended by your textbook as a way to avoid plagiarism?
  62. Avoid using direct quotations from other people in your speech.
  63. Try to use as few sources as possible in researching your speech.
  64. Avoid citing quotations and paraphrases in your speech.
  65. Get an early start on researching and preparing your speech.
  66. Make sure you include information from the library in your speech.
  67. According to your textbook, global plagiarism occurs when a person
  68. bases his or her speech completely on foreign sources.
  69. fails to cite sources throughout the body of the speech.
  70. takes a speech entirely from one source and passes it off as her or his own.
  71. uses two or three sources and blends the information into a unified whole.
  72. bases the speech entirely on his or her personal experience.
  73. Tanya went to the beach instead of staying in town and working on her speech. When she realized how soon the speech was due, she asked a friend who had already taken public speaking to loan her an old outline, which she used verbatim for her class speech. Which of the following statements best describes Tanya’s actions?
  74. Tanya should have planned better, but she isn’t guilty of plagiarism.
  75. Tanya is guilty of global plagiarism.
  76. Tanya is guilty of patchwork plagiarism.
  77. Tanya is ethical if she cites the friend whose speech she used.
  78. Tanya is guilty of incremental plagiarism.
  79. According to your textbook, __________ plagiarism occurs when a speaker copies word for word from two or three sources.
  80. global
  81. incremental
  82. patchwork
  83. secondary
  84. partial
  85. As your textbook explains, a speaker who assembles a speech by copying word for word from two or three sources is committing what kind of plagiarism?
  86. partial
  87. incremental
  88. global
  89. patchwork
  90. secondary
  91. Which of the following does your textbook recommend as a way to avoid patchwork plagiarism?
  92. Consult a large number of sources in your research.
  93. Do all of your research at the library.
  94. Keep a record of the order in which you locate research sources.
  95. Use encyclopedias in your research.
  96. Take all the notes from each research source on a single page.
  97. Which of the following does your textbook recommend as a way to avoid patchwork plagiarism?
  98. Do most of your research on the Internet.
  99. Take all the notes from each source on a single page.
  100. Consult a large number of sources in your research.
  101. all of the above
  102. b and c only
  103. Ryan located three excellent sources for his persuasive speech. He copied long sections from each source word for word, strung them together with a few transitions, and mentioned the sources of his information in passing. Which of the following statements best describes Ryan’s situation?
  104. Ryan is ethical because he did research for his speech.
  105. Ryan is guilty of global plagiarism.
  106. Ryan is guilty of patchwork plagiarism.
  107. Ryan is ethical because he mentioned the sources of his information.
  108. Ryan is guilty of incremental plagiarism.
  109. According to your textbook, __________ plagiarism occurs when the speech as a whole is ethical but the speaker fails to give credit for particular quotations and paraphrases.
  110. incidental
  111. informative
  112. inferential
  113. invalid
  114. incremental
  115. According to your textbook, __________ plagiarism occurs when the speech as a whole is ethical but the speaker fails to give credit for particular quotations and paraphrases.
  116. incremental
  117. patchwork
  118. accidental
  119. incidental
  120. global
  121. Which of the following does your textbook recommend as a way to avoid incremental plagiarism?
  122. Avoid doing research on the Internet.
  123. Give credit to the sources of all ideas that you paraphrase.
  124. Use encyclopedias for basic factual information.
  125. all of the above
  126. a and b only
  127. Which of the following does your textbook recommend as a way to steer clear of incremental plagiarism?
  128. Avoid using direct quotations from other people in your speech.
  129. Only use your original ideas so there is no risk of plagiarism.
  130. Avoid citing sources that might make someone suspect plagiarism.
  131. Cite the sources of all quotations and paraphrases in your speech.
  132. Avoid paraphrasing information from other people in your speech.
  133. Emil began his research early and found some excellent sources for his informative speech. He cut and pasted passages from several Web sites into a file in his word processor. When he started putting his speech together, he used some complete sentences from the cut-and-pasted materials, paraphrases from other passages, and several original ideas of his own. Unfortunately, Emil forgot to record his sources in his research notes, so he didn’t cite any of the sources in his speech. Which of the following statements best describes Emil’s situation?
  134. Emil is guilty of global plagiarism.
  135. Emil is ethical because he used many of his own ideas.
  136. Emil is ethical because he started his research early and found good materials.
  137. Emil is ethical because he meant to take better notes about his sources.
  138. Emil is guilty of incremental plagiarism.
  139. Jerome found several excellent sources for his informative speech. He pulled key information from them, blended those ideas into his own perspective, and cited his sources when he presented the speech. Which of the following statements best describes this situation?
  140. Jerome is ethical because he cited his sources and used them to develop his own slant on the topic.
  141. Jerome is guilty of incremental plagiarism because he used quotations and paraphrases from other people in his speech.
  142. Jerome is ethical because he did not copy his speech from a single source.
  143. Jerome is guilty of patchwork plagiarism because he used ideas from several different sources in his speech.
  144. Jerome is guilty of global plagiarism because he did not develop his speech entirely from his own knowledge and experience.
  145. To avoid plagiarism when using information from an Internet document in your speech, your textbook recommends that you keep a record of
  146. the title of the document.
  147. the author or organization responsible for the document.
  148. the date on which you accessed the document.
  149. all of the above.
  150. a and b only.
  151. When Sophia attended the first discussion section for her math class and heard her instructor begin speaking with an unfamiliar accent, she immediately decided, “I won’t learn anything from this teacher.” Sophia failed to uphold which guideline for ethical listening?
  152. Listen attentively.
  153. Avoid prejudging the speaker.
  154. Take accurate notes.
  155. Support free speech.
  156. Avoid name-calling.
  157. The three guidelines for ethical listening discussed in your textbook are
  158. listen attentively, take accurate notes, and avoid prejudging the speaker.
  159. support free speech, avoid name-calling, and listen attentively.
  160. listen attentively, avoid prejudging the speaker, and support free speech.
  161. take accurate notes, support free speech, and avoid name-calling.
  162. avoid stereotyping the speaker, support free speech, and take accurate notes.
  163. According to your textbook, the ethical obligations of listeners in a public speaking situation include
  164. maintaining the free and open expression of ideas.
  165. judging the speaker on the basis of her or his prestige.
  166. being courteous and attentive during the speech.
  167. all of the above.
  168. a and c only.
  169. According to your textbook, the guidelines for ethical listening in a public speaking situation include
  170. maintaining the free and open expression of ideas.
  171. judging the speaker on the basis of her or his prestige.
  172. taking accurate notes of what the speaker says.
  173. all of the above.
  174. a and c only.
  175. A listener’s ethical obligations include
  176. being courteous and attentive during a speech.
  177. agreeing with everything a speaker says.
  178. maintaining the free and open expression of ideas.
  179. all of the above.
  180. a and c only.
  181. According to your textbook, the ethical obligations of listeners include
  182. judging the speaker on the basis of his or her delivery.
  183. listening to the speaker courteously and attentively.
  184. maintaining the free and open expression of ideas.
  185. all of the above.
  186. b and c only.
  187. A listener’s ethical obligation to avoid prejudging a speaker means that a listener should
  188. agree with everything the speaker says.
  189. strive to understand the speaker before criticizing his or her ideas.
  190. focus on the speaker’s delivery when responding to the speech.
  191. all of the above.
  192. a and c only.
  193. In his persuasive speech, Jeremy argued that the category “sexual orientation” should be added to his state’s civil rights law. Most of Jeremy’s classmates listened carefully to his argument. Some were persuaded, while others continued to believe that the current system was justified. Two audience members disagreed so strongly with Jeremy that instead of listening, they wrote notes back and forth to each other throughout the speech. Which of the following statements best describes the issues of ethical listening involved in this situation?
  194. Everyone in the class was an ethical listener because no one interrupted Jeremy or prevented him from speaking.
  195. The people who listened carefully to Jeremy’s arguments were ethical listeners, regardless of whether they were persuaded.
  196. The two classmates who refused to listen to Jeremy’s speech and wrote notes back and forth violated the guidelines for ethical listening.
  197. all of the above
  198. b and c only

 

Short-Answer Questions

  1. _______________ is the branch of philosophy that deals with issues of right and wrong in human affairs.

Ethics

  1. According to the ancient Roman rhetorician Quintilian, the ideal of ethical speech-making is the _______________ person speaking _______________ .

good; well

 

  1. The five guidelines in your textbook for ethical public speaking are

 

Make sure your goals are ethically sound.

Be fully prepared for each speech.

Be honest in what you say.

Avoid name-calling and abusive language.

Put ethical principles into practice.

 

  1. Representing someone else’s information in a speech or paper as though it were your own is called _______________ .

plagiarism

 

  1. The three types of plagiarism discussed in your text are _______________ ,
    _______________ , and _______________ .

patchwork plagiarism

global plagiarism

incremental plagiarism

 

  1. _______________ plagiarism occurs when a speaker steals a speech entirely from another source and passes it off as his or her own.

Global

 

  1. _______________ plagiarism occurs when a speaker fails to give credit for particular parts of the speech that are borrowed from other people.

Incremental

 

  1. _______________ plagiarism occurs when a speaker copies passages from a few sources and strings them together in a speech.

Patchwork

  1. To _______________ is to restate or summarize an author’s ideas in one’s own words.

paraphrase

 

  1. The three guidelines presented in your textbook for ethical listening are:

 

Be courteous and attentive.

Avoid prejudging the speaker.

Maintain the free and open expression of ideas.

 

 

Essay Questions

  1. Briefly explain the following statement: “Public speaking is a form of power and therefore carries with it heavy ethical responsibilities.”

 

  1. Identify and discuss four of the basic guidelines presented in your textbook for ethical speechmaking.

 

  1. Briefly discuss the ethical importance of avoiding sexist, racist, and other forms of abusive language in a public speech.

 

  1. Explain two reasons why it is important from an ethical standpoint for a public speaker to be fully prepared for each speech.

 

  1. What are the three types of plagiarism discussed in your textbook? Give a hypothetical example of each type.

 

  1. Explain the following statement: “Speechmaking is a two-way street. Just as public speakers have ethical responsibilities, so too do listeners.”

 

  1. Identify and explain the three guidelines for ethical listening discussed in your textbook.

 

  1. Explain the following statement: “It is important to keep in mind that ensuring a person’s freedom to express her or his ideas does not imply agreement with those ideas. You can disagree entirely with the message but still support the speaker’s right to express it.”

 

 

10

 

Beginning and Ending
the Speech

 

 

 

 

T

he questions for each chapter are organized according to type: true-false, multiple-choice, short-answer, and essay. Within each of these categories, questions are clustered by topic, roughly following the order of topics in the textbook.

To provide as much flexibility as possible in constructing examinations, there is deliberate overlap among the questions, both within and across question types. This enables you to choose the wording and question type that best fits your testing objectives. In deciding which questions to use, take care to avoid items such as a multiple-choice question that gives away the answer to a true-false or short-answer question, or an essay question that covers essentially the same ground as a true-false, short-answer, or multiple-choice question.

Each type of question—true-false, multiple-choice, short-answer, and essay—has an automatic numbering system, which means you can copy and paste items from within a question type, and they will automatically number themselves consecutively, beginning with “1.” The five answer choices for each multiple-choice question are also ordered automatically, and so you can add, change, or reorder answer choices without rearranging the lettering.

If you would like to preserve the fonts, indents, and tabs of the original questions, you can substitute questions for those in the sample final exams or copy and paste questions into the Exam Master provided in the final Word file of the Test Bank. In the Exam Master, spaces for your course name, exam type, and the student’s name and section are followed by headings and instructions for true-false, multiple-choice, short-answer, and essay questions. You can add elements unique to your exams and delete elements you don’t want to use. After you customize the Exam Master, you can save it with your changes. Then, each time you open it, click “Save As” to give it the name of the exam you are currently constructing.

 

True-False Questions

  1. T F      Regardless of what other methods you use to gain attention, you should always relate the topic to your audience in the introduction of a speech.
  2. T F      It is seldom a good idea to discuss the importance of your topic in the introduction of a speech.
  3. T F      The first thing you should do in the introduction of a speech is to reveal the topic.
  4. T F      A startling introduction is effective only if it is firmly related to the speech topic.
  5. T F      A rhetorical question is a question that the audience answers mentally rather than out loud.
  6. T F      When you use a rhetorical question to gain attention in a speech introduction, you should state the question, pause a moment, and then give the answer.
  7. T F      Opening your speech with a lengthy quotation is an excellent way to gain the attention of your audience.
  8. T F      A story is an effective way to get the interest and attention of the audience, regardless of how well the story is delivered.
  9. T F      Using visual aids is an acceptable method of gaining attention in the introduction of a speech.
  10. T F      The best way to gain the audience’s attention and interest in a speech introduction usually depends on the topic, the audience, and the occasion.
  11. T F      If your topic is clear in the body of the speech, there is no need to state it in the introduction.
  12. T F      It is usually a good idea to restate your topic at some point in the introduction, even if the listeners already know it.
  13. T F      Credibility is the audience’s perception of whether a speaker is qualified to speak on a given topic.
  14. T F      Establishing credibility is an important function of a speech introduction.
  15. T F      One way to establish your credibility in a speech introduction is to let the audience know the source of your expertise.
  16. T F      Goodwill is the audience’s perception of whether a speaker is qualified to speak on a given topic.
  17. T F      Goodwill is the audience’s perception of whether the speaker has the best interests of the audience in mind.
  18. T F      Establishing goodwill is more likely to be necessary in the introduction of a persuasive speech than in the introduction of an informative speech.
  19. T F      Establishing goodwill is more likely to be necessary in the introduction of an informative speech than in the introduction of a persuasive speech.
  20. T F      Establishing goodwill is especially necessary in the introduction of a speech presented to a hostile audience.
  21. T F      One function of a preview statement is to signal that the body of the speech is about to begin.
  22. T F      The preview statement is usually the last component of an introduction and serves as a bridge to the body of the speech.
  23. T F      A preview statement is usually necessary in the introduction even when a speaker is addressing an audience that is well-informed about the topic.
  24. T F      The preview statement in a speech introduction identifies the main points to be discussed in the body.
  25. T F      Under normal circumstances, the introduction should constitute about 10 to 20 percent of a speech.
  26. T F      As your textbook explains, you should usually work out the exact wording of your introduction before you prepare the body of your speech.
  27. T F      Under normal circumstances, you should work out the exact wording of your introduction after you have finished preparing the body of your speech.
  28. T F      As your textbook explains, working out a speech introduction in detail can boost a speaker’s confidence.
  29. T F      Your introduction will have the greatest impact if you begin to speak the moment you reach the front of the room.
  30. T F      One function of a speech conclusion is to establish the credibility of the speaker.
  31. T F      Arousing the curiosity of the audience is one of the major functions of a speech conclusion discussed in your textbook.
  32. T F      It is inappropriate for a public speaker to say anything so obvious as “in conclusion.”
  33. T F      The only way to convey that your speech is ending is through the use of words such as “In conclusion.”
  34. T F      A speech conclusion that builds in power and intensity as it moves toward the closing line is known as a crescendo ending.
  35. T F      A speech conclusion that builds in power and intensity as it moves toward the closing line is known as a dissolve ending.
  36. T F      The crescendo conclusion is essentially a matter of the speaker getting louder and louder as the speech comes to an end.
  37. T F      The conclusion of Martin Luther King’s “I Have a Dream” is a good example of a crescendo ending.
  38. T F      A dissolve ending is a conclusion that generates emotional appeal by fading step by step to a dramatic final statement.
  39. T F      One function of a speech conclusion is to reinforce the speaker’s central idea.
  40. T F      It is overly repetitious to restate the central idea in the conclusion of a speech.
  41. T F      Using a quotation is one of the most common and effective ways to conclude a speech.
  42. T F      When concluding a speech, it is inappropriate to refer back to ideas mentioned in the introduction.
  43. T F      Referring back to the introduction in your conclusion is a good way to give the speech psychological unity.
  44. T F      The conclusion should normally comprise about 5 to 10 percent of a speech.
  45. T F      The conclusion should normally make up about 25 percent of a speech.

 

 

 

Multiple-Choice Questions    (Students are to indicate the best answer for each question by circling the correct letter.)

  1. According to your textbook, when you are in a formal speaking situation the most effective way of gaining the initial attention of your audience after you walk to the lectern is
  2. asking someone to lower the lights.
  3. beginning to speak loudly and clearly.
  4. rapping your hand lightly on the lectern until everyone is quiet.
  5. looking directly at the audience without saying a word.
  6. asking everyone to be quiet and pay attention.
  7. Which of the following is a basic objective of a speech introduction?
  8. Reinforce the central idea.
  9. Preview the main points.
  10. Gain the attention of the audience.
  11. all of the above
  12. b and c only
  13. Which of the following is a major objective of a speech introduction?
  14. Reveal the topic.
  15. Identify the audience.
  16. Reinforce the central idea.
  17. all of the above
  18. a and c only
  19. All of the following are basic objectives of a speech introduction except
  20. Establish credibility and goodwill.
  21. Support your main points.
  22. Reveal the topic of the speech.
  23. Preview the body of the speech.
  24. Get the audience’s attention and interest.
  25. Which of the following would you expect to find in a well-constructed speech introduction?
  26. a statement establishing the speaker’s credibility
  27. a statement gaining the audience’s attention
  28. a statement previewing the main points of the speech
  29. all of the above
  30. a and b only
  31. Which of the following would you be most likely to find in a well-constructed speech introduction?
  32. a visual aid
  33. a preview statement
  34. an internal summary
  35. a research citation
  36. a lengthy quotation
  37. Which of the following would you most likely find in a well-constructed speech introduction?
  38. a transition
  39. an internal summary
  40. a lengthy quotation
  41. a startling statement
  42. a causal argument
  43. Which of the following would you most likely find in a speech introduction?
  44. a credibility statement
  45. a transition
  46. a causal argument
  47. an internal summary
  48. a call to action
  49. Which of the following would you least likely find in a speech introduction?
  50. a preview statement
  51. an announcement of the topic
  52. a brief quotation
  53. a credibility statement
  54. an internal summary
  55. Even when you use other interest-arousing lures in a speech introduction, you should always
  56. startle the audience.
  57. use a rhetorical question.
  58. relate the topic to the audience.
  59. tell an interesting story.
  60. present striking statistics.
  61. When preparing a speech introduction, you should usually
  62. preview the main points to be discussed in the body.
  63. gain the attention and interest of your audience.
  64. establish your credibility on the speech topic.
  65. all of the above.
  66. a and b only.
  67. When preparing a speech introduction, you should usually
  68. reveal the topic of the speech.
  69. support the central idea with evidence.
  70. preview the main points of the speech.
  71. all of the above.
  72. a and c only.
  73. __________ is the audience’s perception of whether the speaker is qualified to speak on a given topic.
  74. Identification
  75. Goodwill
  76. Connectivity
  77. Egocentrism
  78. Credibility
  79. According to your textbook, __________ is the audience’s perception of whether a speaker has the best interests of the audience in mind.
  80. goodwill
  81. receptiveness
  82. identification
  83. connectedness
  84. egocentrism
  85. When you advocate a highly unpopular position, it is particularly important to __________ in the introduction of your speech.
  86. tell a story
  87. define unclear terms
  88. have a concise preview statement
  89. state the importance of the topic
  90. establish goodwill toward the audience
  91. According to your textbook, a speaker who attempts to establish goodwill in the introduction of a speech is aiming to convince the audience that she or he
  92. will not talk for a long time.
  93. has the best interests of the audience in mind.
  94. is willing to take questions at the end of the speech.
  95. will avoid using illogical arguments.
  96. is qualified to speak on the topic.
  97. Creating goodwill is especially important in the introduction of a(n) __________ speech.
  98. commemorative
  99. acceptance
  100. persuasive
  101. after-dinner
  102. informative
  103. When preparing an introduction for a speech to a hostile audience, you should be especially careful to
  104. preview the body of the speech.
  105. establish credibility and goodwill.
  106. state the importance of the topic.
  107. use statistics in the introduction.
  108. arouse the curiosity of the audience.
  109. When used in a speech introduction, telling a story, asking a question, making a startling statement, and arousing curiosity are all methods of
  110. previewing the body of the speech.
  111. enhancing the speaker’s credibility.
  112. establishing goodwill with the audience.
  113. revealing the topic of the speech.
  114. gaining the attention of the audience.
  115. Which of the following is least likely to gain the attention and interest of the audience?
  116. a rhetorical question
  117. an intriguing statement
  118. a lengthy quotation
  119. striking statistics
  120. a personal story
  121. According to your textbook, the last part of a speech introduction usually
  122. establishes the speaker’s credibility.
  123. identifies the topic of the speech.
  124. previews the main points in the body.
  125. relates the topic to the audience.
  126. shows the speaker’s goodwill.
  127. When you need to make sure an audience has the information necessary to understand the body of your speech, your preview statement in the introduction might include a
  128. credibility statement.
  129. statistical reference.
  130. all of the above.
  131. a and c only.
  132. If you were giving an informative speech to your classmates on the subject of photokinesis, you would probably include a __________ in your introduction.
  133. quotation
  134. startling statement
  135. rhetorical question
  136. story
  137. definition
  138. As your textbook explains, when preparing a speech introduction, you should usually
  139. practice the introduction no more than one or two times.
  140. make the introduction about 10 to 20 percent of the entire speech.
  141. plan to begin speaking immediately so the audience will quiet down.
  142. all of the above.
  143. b and c only.
  144. What does your textbook say about preparing effective speech introductions?
  145. The best introduction is likely to be the one that comes to mind first.
  146. A lengthy quotation can gain attention and help build credibility.
  147. Determine the exact wording of the introduction before preparing the body.
  148. Plan to deliver the introduction impromptu so it will be spontaneous.
  149. Make your introduction no more than 10 to 20 percent of the entire speech.
  150. To prepare an effective speech introduction, your textbook recommends that you
  151. keep your introduction relatively brief.
  152. be creative in devising your introduction.
  153. work out your introduction in detail.
  154. all of the above.
  155. a and b only.
  156. When preparing a speech introduction, your textbook recommends that you
  157. experiment with different openings until you find the best one.
  158. practice your introduction until you can deliver it with strong eye contact.
  159. start delivering your introduction while you are walking to the lectern.
  160. all of the above.
  161. a and b only.
  162. When preparing a speech introduction, your textbook recommends that you
  163. keep an eye out for introductory material as you research your speech.
  164. make sure the introduction is at least 25 percent of your speech.
  165. perfect the introduction before you work on the body of your speech.
  166. all of the above.
  167. a and b only.
  168. When preparing a speech introduction, you should usually
  169. practice the introduction no more than two or three times.
  170. make sure the introduction takes up 25 percent of the speech.
  171. complete the introduction after the body of the speech.
  172. stick with the first introduction that comes to mind.
  173. use humor to gain the audience’s attention and interest.
  174. The best time to work out the exact wording of a speech introduction is
  175. shortly after you determine the central idea.
  176. before you work out the conclusion.
  177. when you prepare your speaking outline.
  178. after you prepare the body of the speech.
  179. as you rise to deliver an extemporaneous speech.
  180. According to your textbook, the best time to work out the exact wording of a speech introduction is
  181. while you are researching the speech.
  182. as you rise to deliver a persuasive speech.
  183. at the same time you formulate the specific purpose.
  184. after you prepare the body of the speech.
  185. before you finish phrasing the central idea.
  186. Molly began her speech as follows:

I want all of you to think about your day. What did you eat? How active were you? How late will it be before you get to bed? These are the kinds of questions I would like to talk about this evening.

What method(s) for gaining attention and interest did Rachel use?

  1. questioning the audience
  2. stating the importance of the topic
  3. relating the topic to the audience
  4. all of the above
  5. a and c only
  6. Paul began his speech as follows:

They called Lou Gehrig the iron horse. This tireless worker played an astounding 2,130 consecutive baseball games even though he suffered 17 hand fractures during those years. This would be like one of us never missing a day of school for over 13 years. Can you imagine completing kindergarten through your senior year with perfect attendance? Never taking a sick day, never a college visit day, or even senior skip day. And, to match Gehrig, you would also have to end your school career with an A average.

What method for gaining attention and interest did Paul use?

  1. revealing the general purpose
  2. relating the topic to the audience
  3. previewing the body of the speech
  4. stating the importance of the topic
  5. summarizing the central idea
  6. Leung began the introduction of his informative speech with these words:

How many of you just can’t wait until spring break? How many of you plan to hit the road about a minute after your last class lets out? How many of you are looking forward to having a great time?

Which objective of a speech introduction were these words designed to fulfill?

  1. reveal the topic of the speech
  2. indicate the importance of the topic
  3. gain the attention of the audience
  4. enhance the credibility of the speaker
  5. preview the main points of the speech
  6. Tobias began his informative speech by saying:

You hear a noise under the hood of your car, so you pull over to the side of the road. Your engine goes dead; you try to start the car, but it just sits there. Then you see a lot of black smoke. What’s happened? Why won’t your car go anywhere?

What method for gaining attention and interest did Tobias use?

  1. establishing goodwill with the audience
  2. arousing the curiosity of the audience
  3. stating the importance of the topic
  4. presenting a startling statement
  5. establishing his credibility as a speaker
  6. If a real estate developer were speaking to a group of citizens opposed to the creation of a shopping center in their neighborhood, the most important objective of her or his introduction would probably be to
  7. gain the attention of the audience.
  8. reveal the topic of the speech.
  9. relate the topic to the audience.
  10. state the importance of the topic.
  11. create goodwill with the audience.
  12. If Robert Downey Jr. were to deliver a speech about the future of medical care in the United States, his main task in the introduction of his speech would probably be to
  13. establish credibility.
  14. reveal the topic.
  15. gain attention.
  16. preview the body.
  17. define key terms.
  18. If Natalie Portman were to deliver a speech on international diplomacy, her main task in the introduction would be to
  19. reveal the topic of her speech.
  20. gain attention and interest.
  21. preview the body of her speech.
  22. establish her credibility on the topic.
  23. state the importance of her topic.
  24. The following passage from a speech introduction is an example of __________ .

After attending a seminar on currency security, I became fascinated by the technology developed by the Treasury Department to prevent the counterfeiting of paper money. I learned more about the subject by reading information from the Treasury Department, as well as by interviewing Donna Marshall, a security expert at Bank of America.

  1. revealing the topic
  2. previewing the body
  3. stating the importance of the topic
  4. establishing the speaker’s credibility
  5. relating to the audience
  6. In the introduction to his speech on the art of digital photography, Terrance mentioned that he works part-time at a camera shop and has had some of his pictures printed in the newspaper. By sharing this information with his audience, Terrance was seeking to accomplish which goal of a speech introduction?
  7. gain attention
  8. preview the speech
  9. reveal the topic
  10. relate to the audience
  11. establish credibility
  12. In the introduction of his speech on the Special Olympics, Mason mentioned that he had attended the events last year to cheer on a family friend who was competing in some races. Sharing this information with the audience helped Mason achieve which goal of a speech introduction?
  13. relating to the audience
  14. generating emotional appeal
  15. stating the importance of the topic
  16. establishing credibility
  17. previewing the body
  18. According to your textbook, the following passage from a speech introduction is an example of a(n) __________ .

I became interested in canine companions two years ago when my older sister, who was paralyzed in a car accident, received a canine companion named Lucky. Since then I have learned more about the subject by watching Lucky, by talking with my sister, and by reading a number of articles and pamphlets.

  1. preview statement
  2. narrative statement
  3. credibility statement
  4. attention statement
  5. thesis statement
  6. In the introduction of her speech on bike paths, Shannon mentioned her involvement with a local cycling club and her work on a grant requesting state funding for a local bike trail. By sharing this information with her audience, Shannon was seeking to accomplish which goal of a speech introduction?
  7. gain attention
  8. establish credibility
  9. preview the body of the speech
  10. relate to the audience
  11. reveal the topic
  12. According to your textbook, the following passage from a speech introduction is an example of a(n) __________ .

Today I would like to share what I have learned about attention deficit disorder by first discussing its effects on people and then looking at the treatments that can be used to help people who suffer from this condition.

  1. opening statement
  2. attention statement
  3. preview statement
  4. credibility statement
  5. transition statement
  6. Which objective of a good speech introduction is fulfilled by the following statement?

Today we will explore the three most important forms of intellectual property protection—copyrights, trademarks, and patents.

  1. preview the body
  2. establish the speaker’s goodwill
  3. state the importance of the topic
  4. summarize the introduction
  5. relate to the audience
  6. According to your textbook, the following passage from a speech introduction is an example of a(n) __________ .

In order for you to understand why the mariachi are significant to Hispanic culture, I will give you a brief overview of the history of the mariachi, their style of dress, and the ways they are used in entertainment today.

  1. preview statement
  2. credibility statement
  3. transition statement
  4. attention statement
  5. summary statement
  6. According to your textbook, the following passage from a speech introduction is an example of a(n) __________ .

In my speech today, I will show you the serious health dangers posed by the flu, and I will urge each of you to get a flu shot every year without fail.

  1. preview statement
  2. transition statement
  3. credibility statement
  4. attention statement
  5. summary statement
  6. What does your textbook say about preparing an effective speech conclusion?
  7. Make your conclusion about 5 to 10 percent of the entire speech.
  8. Work especially hard on establishing your credibility in the conclusion.
  9. Keep an eye out for concluding materials as you research the speech.
  10. all of the above
  11. a and c only
  12. According to your textbook, which of the following statements about speech conclusions is true?
  13. The conclusion should take up about 25 percent of a speech.
  14. Ending a speech abruptly is an excellent way to reinforce the speaker’s central idea.
  15. The last sentence of a speech should usually offer to answer questions from the audience.
  16. All four methods of reinforcing the central idea can be combined in a single conclusion.
  17. It is usually best to let a conclusion grow out of the inspiration of the moment.
  18. What does your textbook say about preparing effective speech conclusions?
  19. Be sure to reinforce your credibility before ending the speech.
  20. The best conclusion is likely to be the one that comes to mind first.
  21. Leave most of the conclusion to chance so it will sound natural.
  22. Make your conclusion about 5 to 10 percent of the entire speech.
  23. Use an extended example in the conclusion for emotional appeal.
  24. As explained in your textbook, the two major functions of a speech conclusion are to
  25. signal the end of the speech and thank the audience for attending.
  26. reinforce the central idea and establish the speaker’s credibility.
  27. thank the audience for attending and apologize for any mistakes in the speech.
  28. signal the end of the speech and reinforce the speaker’s central idea.
  29. repeat the preview statement and review the speaker’s visual aids.
  30. The conclusion of a speech is an appropriate time to
  31. add supporting materials you could not work into the body.
  32. reinforce your listeners’ commitment to the central idea.
  33. apologize for any mistakes you made during the speech.
  34. all of the above.
  35. b and c only.
  36. Which of the following is recommended in your textbook as a way to reinforce the central idea in a speech conclusion?
  37. End with a quotation.
  38. Make a dramatic statement.
  39. Refer to the introduction.
  40. all of the above
  41. a and b only
  42. Which of the following does your textbook mention as a means of reinforcing the central idea in the conclusion of a speech?
  43. End with a quotation.
  44. End with a visual aid.
  45. End with thanking the audience.
  46. all of the above
  47. a and c only
  48. Referring back to your introduction in the conclusion of your speech is recommended as a way to
  49. secure the audience’s attention.
  50. reinforce your credibility as a speaker.
  51. move the audience to action.
  52. give the speech psychological unity.
  53. develop a dissolve ending.
  54. Which of the following is recommended in your textbook as a way to reinforce the central idea in a speech conclusion?
  55. Speed up your rate of delivery.
  56. Refer back to the introduction.
  57. Ask for questions from the audience.
  58. all of the above
  59. b and c only
  60. Dale started his speech on financial planning with a story about his cousin Mike’s bankruptcy hearing. In the conclusion, Dale gave an update on Mike’s current financial condition. According to your textbook, referring to the introduction in the conclusion is a way to
  61. secure the audience’s attention.
  62. reinforce your credibility as a speaker.
  63. move the audience to action.
  64. give the speech psychological unity.
  65. develop a dissolve ending.
  66. According to your textbook, in addition to reinforcing the central idea, a speech conclusion should also
  67. secure the audience’s attention.
  68. build your credibility as a speaker.
  69. reveal the topic of the speech.
  70. provide a clear preview statement.
  71. signal the end of the speech.
  72. Which of the following would you most likely find in a speech conclusion?
  73. a preview statement
  74. an announcement of the topic
  75. a lengthy quotation
  76. a reference to the introduction
  77. a statement of goodwill
  78. Which of the following would you most likely find in a speech conclusion?
  79. a personal story
  80. a reference to the introduction
  81. an internal preview
  82. a credibility statement
  83. a visual aid
  84. Which of the following would you most likely find in a speech conclusion?
  85. a preview statement
  86. an announcement of the topic
  87. a gesture of goodwill
  88. a credibility statement
  89. a restatement of the central idea
  90. Which of the following would you most likely find in a speech conclusion?
  91. a causal argument
  92. an extended example
  93. a provocative quotation
  94. a rhetorical question
  95. an internal preview
  96. Which of the following would you least likely find in a speech conclusion?
  97. dramatic statement
  98. summary of the main points
  99. a statement to arouse curiosity
  100. a reference to the introduction
  101. a brief quotation
  102. Which of the following would you least likely find in a speech conclusion?
  103. a credibility statement
  104. a provocative quotation
  105. a call to action
  106. a reference to the introduction
  107. a summary of the main points
  108. According to your textbook, a(n) __________ ending is a conclusion that builds force until reaching a peak of power and intensity.
  109. crescendo
  110. cascade
  111. dissolve
  112. reflective
  113. ascending
  114. The conclusion of Martin Luther King’s “I Have a Dream” speech is an example of a
  115. dissolve ending.
  116. connective ending.
  117. crescendo ending.
  118. cascade ending.
  119. diminutive ending.
  120. According to your textbook, when a speaker concludes a speech by fading out on an emotional note, she or he is using a __________ ending.
  121. descending
  122. crescendo
  123. cascade
  124. dissolve
  125. reflective
  126. In her persuasive speech, Josina concluded with the following statement:

So the next time you see flyers around campus announcing a blood drive, decide that this will be your moment to get involved—to do something worthwhile, to take a step that may help save someone’s life.

What method of concluding her speech did Josina use?

  1. extended example
  2. internal summary
  3. reference to the introduction
  4. appeal to action
  5. causal reasoning
  6. A(n) __________ is most appropriate in the conclusion of a persuasive speech.
  7. appeal to action
  8. lengthy quotation
  9. internal summary
  10. extended example
  11. definition
  12. An appeal to action is most appropriate in the conclusion of a(n) __________ speech.
  13. informative
  14. after-dinner
  15. acceptance
  16. commemorative
  17. persuasive

 

 

 

 

Short-Answer Questions

  1. What are the four major objectives of a speech introduction?

 

Get the attention and interest of the audience.

Reveal the topic of the speech.

Establish the speaker’s credibility and goodwill.

Preview the body of the speech.

 

  1. When you use a _______________ question in the introduction of a speech, you expect the audience to answer mentally rather than out loud.

rhetorical

 

  1. According to your textbook, no matter what other methods of gaining attention you use in a speech introduction, you should always _______________ .

relate the topic to the audience

 

  1. Establishing _______________ in a speech introduction is a matter of getting your audience to perceive you as qualified to speak on the topic.

credibility

 

  1. The _______________ provides a lead-in from the introduction to the body of the speech.

preview statement

 

  1. A statement in the introduction of a speech that identifies the main points to be discussed in the body is called a _______________ statement.

preview

 

  1. The two major functions of a speech conclusion are to _______________ and to _______________ .

signal the end of the speech

reinforce the central idea

 

  1. One way to let an audience know that you are coming to the end of a speech is by saying something like “In conclusion.” Another way is by your manner of ______________ .

delivery

 

  1. When you use a(n) _______________ ending, the speech builds in force until it reaches a zenith of power and intensity in the conclusion.

crescendo

 

  1. List six methods you can use to gain the attention and interest of an audience in the introduction of a speech.

The textbook discusses seven methods:

Relate the topic to the audience.

State the importance of the topic.

Startle the audience.

Arouse the curiosity of the audience.

Question the audience.

Begin with a quotation.

Tell a story.

 

The textbook also mentions five additional methods:

Refer to the occasion.

Invite audience participation.

Use audio equipment or visual aids.

Relate to a previous speaker.

Begin with humor.

 

Any six of these twelve methods should constitute a satisfactory answer.

 

  1. The four methods discussed in the text for reinforcing the central idea in a speech conclusion are:

 

summarize the main points

end with a quotation

make a dramatic statement

refer to the introduction

 

 

Essay Questions

  1. List and explain the four objectives of a speech introduction.

 

  1. What is the first thing a speaker must do in the introduction? Why?

 

  1. What are six methods a speaker can use in a speech introduction to gain the attention and interest of an audience? Identify each and offer a brief explanation.

 

  1. What is a preview statement? Why should the introduction of a speech nearly always include a preview statement?

 

  1. Which should you usually prepare first—the introduction of a speech or the body? Why?

 

  1. Explain the two main functions of a speech conclusion.

 

  1. List and explain the four methods presented in your textbook for reinforcing the central idea in the conclusion of a speech.

 

  1. Explain the following statement: “You can let your audience know your speech is coming to an end both by what you say and by your manner of delivery.”

 

  1. What are the requirements of a good speech introduction? Evaluate the following complete introduction to a classroom speech in light of those requirements. Be specific in your answer.

Imagine yourself walking through a large department store. You admire the new fashions, fiddle with the cameras, gawk at the jewelry, and check out the stereo equipment. Now imagine you can have any of those items for free—all you have to do is steal them.

The temptation is great—so great that shoplifting has become one of the most frequent and expensive crimes in the United States. According to Time magazine, there are 150 million incidents of shoplifting in the U.S. each year, and the total value of goods stolen by shoplifters amounts to about $10 billion annually.

And who pays for this? We all do. The value of stolen merchandise, the increased cost of store security, the time consumed in legal proceedings—all are passed on to us in higher prices and higher taxes. The Retail Merchants Association estimates that honest shoppers pay as much as 10 percent more to offset the cost of shoplifting.

Although shoplifting is sometimes called an invisible crime, I have learned to see it in my job as a salesperson at Sears. By doing library research and by talking with security personnel at Sears, I have come to realize how widespread and how complex a problem shoplifting is. Today I would like to discuss with you the kinds of shoplifters and the security procedures used to fight them.

 

  1. What are the requirements of a good speech introduction? Evaluate the following complete introduction to a classroom speech in light of those requirements. Be specific in your answer.

“An attack on the United States with a biological or chemical weapon is an eventuality that must be addressed.” That warning comes from Steven Rosenthal of the U.S. Food and Drug Administration. As Rosenthal’s warning suggests, we must be prepared to deal with the threat of smallpox. Smallpox is a deadly disease, but vaccination dealt with it in the past and will do so again.

Today, I will give you information that will help you understand the current situation with regard to smallpox. We’ll focus on the smallpox threat, the smallpox virus, and the smallpox vaccine.

  1. What are the requirements of a good speech introduction? Evaluate the following complete introduction to a classroom speech in light of those requirements. Be specific in your answer.

The body as we know it was not designed to participate in athletic events under the high demands that athletes face today. This leads to injuries and creates a need for trained professionals to deal with these injuries. I have taken several classes in my pursuit of an athletic training certificate. Today I will talk about what athletic trainers do to prevent injuries, how they assess injuries, and how they work with injuries in rehabilitation.

 

  1. What are the requirements of a good speech introduction? Evaluate the following complete introduction to a classroom speech in light of those requirements. Be specific in your answer.

Hi, my name is Barry. Today I want to talk to you about saving for retirement. How many people here have already started saving money in a retirement account? No one. That’s what I thought. It may seem absurd to start saving now, but it isn’t. Money magazine says college students can benefit tremendously in the long run from the power of compound interest. So let’s get started.

 

  1. What are the requirements of a good speech introduction? Evaluate the following complete introduction to a classroom speech in light of those requirements. Be specific in your answer.

“Oh beautiful for spacious skies, for amber waves of grain; for purple mountains majesty above the fruited plain.”

Most of us are familiar with the song “America the Beautiful” and its description of our natural resources. Let’s step back a minute, though, and consider what the picture might look like in the future. What if the amber waves of grain withered and died because the water table had been disrupted and contaminated? Or consider if the fruited plain was no more than a barren landscape because floods had washed away all the topsoil.

Because I believe that we have to protect our environment, I want to talk with you about one of America’s most precious resource and how it is being destroyed.

 

  1. What are the requirements of a good speech introduction? Evaluate the following complete introduction to a classroom speech in light of those requirements. Be specific in your answer.

A brain aneurysm has been described as “the worst headache you can imagine.” But the outcome is much worse than a headache. Here are the statistics: one-third of the people with a ruptured aneurysm die before they get to the hospital; another third of the people with a ruptured aneurysm die after they get to the hospital. The final third? They survive, but 40 percent of them suffer long-term neurological damage. Today I would like to explore this subject with you.

 

  1. What are the requirements of a good speech introduction? Evaluate the following complete introduction to a classroom speech in light of those requirements. Be specific in your answer.

The most dangerous source of radiation in the United States might be right here in this classroom. The threat is not nuclear power or medical X-rays. Yet according to the Environmental Protection Agency, it threatens up to eight million American homes.

The threat I am talking about is radon, a colorless, odorless gas that may cause as many as 20,000 deaths from lung cancer each year in the United States.

Today we will explore the threat caused by radon gas. We will begin by learning more about radon itself—what it is, where it comes from, and why it is so dangerous. Then we will look at some solutions to the problem—steps that can be taken by government and by individual citizens to control the dangers of radon in our homes.

 

 

 

18

 

Speaking on Special
Occasions

 

 

 

 

T

he questions for each chapter are organized according to type: true-false, multiple-choice, short-answer, and essay. Within each of these categories, questions are clustered by topic, roughly following the order of topics in the textbook.

To provide as much flexibility as possible in constructing examinations, there is deliberate overlap among the questions, both within and across question types. This enables you to choose the wording and question type that best fits your testing objectives. In deciding which questions to use, take care to avoid items such as a multiple-choice question that gives away the answer to a true-false or short-answer question, or an essay question that covers essentially the same ground as a true-false, short-answer, or multiple-choice question.

Each type of question—true-false, multiple-choice, short-answer, and essay—has an automatic numbering system, which means you can copy and paste items from within a question type, and they will automatically number themselves consecutively, beginning with “1.” The five answer choices for each multiple-choice question are also ordered automatically, and so you can add, change, or reorder answer choices without rearranging the lettering.

If you would like to preserve the fonts, indents, and tabs of the original questions, you can substitute questions for those in the sample final exams or copy and paste questions into the Exam Master provided in the final Word file of the Test Bank. In the Exam Master, spaces for your course name, exam type, and the student’s name and section are followed by headings and instructions for true-false, multiple-choice, short-answer, and essay questions. You can add elements unique to your exams and delete elements you don’t want to use. After you customize the Exam Master, you can save it with your changes. Then, each time you open it, click “Save As” to give it the name of the exam you are currently constructing.

 

True-False Questions

  1. T F      The primary purpose of a special occasion speech is to convey information to an audience.
  2. T F      A graduation address and a toast at a wedding are both examples of speeches for special occasions.
  3. T F      The purpose of a speech of introduction is to introduce a person receiving an award or an honor.
  4. T F      The purpose of a speech of introduction is to introduce the main speaker to the audience.
  5. T F      One major purpose of a speech of introduction is to focus attention on the person making the introduction.
  6. T F      One major purpose of a speech of introduction is to build enthusiasm for the upcoming speaker.
  7. T F      As your textbook explains, speeches of introduction usually should be two to three minutes long.
  8. T F      As your textbook explains, speeches of introduction usually should be 8 to 10 minutes long.
  9. T F      When giving a speech of introduction, you should be sure to praise the speaking skills of the main speaker.
  10. T F      One major purpose of a speech of introduction is to establish a welcoming climate that will boost the credibility of the main speaker.
  11. T F      If you are introducing the same speaker to an audience of college students for a morning presentation and to the city chamber of commerce for an afternoon presentation, you should use the same speech for each occasion.
  12. T F      When giving a speech of introduction, you should state the name of the main speaker as soon as possible to avoid confusion among members of the audience.
  13. T F      When giving a speech of introduction, you should usually save the name of the main speaker until the final moment, even when the audience already knows who he or she is.
  14. T F      A speech of introduction should usually be read from a manuscript.
  15. T F      As defined in your textbook, a speech of presentation is a speech that presents someone a gift, an award, or some other form of public recognition.
  16. T F      Speeches of presentation are given when someone is receiving publicly a gift or an award.
  17. T F      The main purpose of a speech of presentation is to provide a biography of the speaker being presented to the audience.
  18. T F      One of the main purposes of a speech of presentation is to build the credibility of the main speaker.
  19. T F      The purpose of a speech of presentation is to present the main speaker to the audience.
  20. T F      When giving a speech of presentation, you should usually explain why the recipient is being given his or her award.
  21. T F      It is almost always in poor taste to mention the losers of an award in a speech of presentation.
  22. T F      The basic purpose of an acceptance speech is to give thanks for a gift or an award.
  23. T F      The three major traits of a good acceptance speech are brevity, humility, and graciousness.
  24. T F      A speech accepting an award is an example of a commemorative speech.
  25. T F      The purpose of a commemorative speech is to pay tribute to a person, a group of people, an institution, or an idea.
  26. T F      The fundamental purpose of a commemorative speech is to inspire your listeners.
  27. T F      The fundamental purpose of a commemorative speech is to convey information about the subject being commemorated.
  28. T F      A speech urging Congress to construct a memorial in Washington, D.C., to recognize women’s contributions to the American Revolution is an example of a commemorative speech.
  29. T F      A speech presenting an award to a professor for outstanding teaching is an example of a commemorative speech.
  30. T F      A speech praising the bravery of the firefighters killed in New York on September 11, 2001, is an example of a commemorative speech.
  31. T F      A speech honoring the astronauts who gave their lives on the space shuttle Columbia is an example of a commemorative speech.
  32. T F      A speech praising Doctors without Borders for its humanitarian contributions is an example of a commemorative speech.
  33. T F      A commemorative speech honoring a person is essentially a biography of that person.
  34. T F      In a commemorative speech, your fundamental purpose is to inspire your listeners.
  35. T F      Effective commemorative speeches depend above all on the speaker’s use of reasoning.
  36. T F      Effective commemorative speeches depend above all on the speaker’s use of language.
  37. T F      A commemorative speech is the one kind of speech in which clichés and trite sentiments are appropriate.

 

Multiple-Choice Questions    (Students are to indicate the best answer for each question by circling the correct letter.)

  1. Which of the following is an example of a speech for a special occasion?
  2. a speech presenting an award to a retiring newspaper editor
  3. a presentation on marketing strategy at a sales meeting
  4. a talk to new college students about how to register for classes
  5. a campaign speech by a candidate for the U.S. Senate
  6. a lecture by a visiting professor in a college class
  7. One main purpose of a speech of introduction is to
  8. explain why the person being introduced is receiving her or his award.
  9. inspire the audience with a sense of the significance of the occasion.
  10. create a welcoming climate to build enthusiasm for the main speaker.
  11. explain why listeners should pay tribute to a person, idea, or institution.
  12. enhance the credibility of the speaker who is making the introduction.
  13. Which of the following is recommended by your textbook as a guideline for a speech of introduction?
  14. Prepare your speech so it will last between 15 and 20 minutes.
  15. Use a quotation at the beginning to secure the attention of the audience.
  16. Make sure your remarks about the main speaker are completely accurate.
  17. Generate humor with an embarrassing story about the main speaker.
  18. Assume that the audience knows nothing about the main speaker.
  19. All of the following are presented in your textbook as guidelines for a speech of introduction except
  20. Be brief.
  21. Adapt your remarks to the occasion.
  22. Bring the speech to life by using a hypothetical example.
  23. Try to create a sense of anticipation and drama.
  24. Make sure your remarks are completely accurate.
  25. All of the following are presented in your textbook as guidelines for a speech of introduction except
  26. Make sure your remarks are completely accurate.
  27. Adapt your remarks to the main speaker.
  28. Adapt your remarks to the audience.
  29. Limit your remarks to ten minutes in length.
  30. Try to create a sense of anticipation and drama.
  31. As your textbook explains, when you give a speech of introduction, you should be sure to adapt your remarks to the
  32. main speaker.
  33. all of the above.
  34. a and b only.
  35. What does it mean to say that a speech of introduction should be “adapted to the main speaker”?
  36. The speech should preview what the main speaker’s points will be.
  37. The speech should be given in the same style as the person being introduced.
  38. The speech should avoid creating discomfort for the main speaker.
  39. all of the above
  40. a and c only
  41. One method recommended in your textbook for creating a sense of drama and anticipation in a speech of introduction is to
  42. present a brief biography of the main speaker.
  43. save the name of the main speaker until the final moment.
  44. use visual aids that focus attention on the main speaker.
  45. praise the speaking skills of the main speaker.
  46. make sure the introduction is completely accurate.
  47. According to your textbook, the best way to create a sense of anticipation and drama in a speech of introduction is to
  48. save the name of the main speaker for last.
  49. tell the audience that the main speaker is an excellent orator.
  50. use PowerPoint to explain the main speaker’s accomplishments.
  51. deliver the speech word for word from a written manuscript.
  52. give a detailed biography of the main speaker.
  53. At the annual basketball banquet, Clark is introducing the men’s coach, a man who is well known by everyone in the room. According to your textbook, the best way for Clark to create a sense of anticipation and drama in his speech of introduction is to
  54. present a detailed biography of the coach’s life.
  55. tell an embarrassing story about the coach’s childhood.
  56. be creative by learning about the coach and casting him in a new light.
  57. all of the above.
  58. b and c only.
  59. As president of the city’s historical society, Madeline is introducing the guest speaker at the society’s year-end banquet. According to your textbook, the best way for Madeline to create a sense of anticipation and drama in her speech of introduction is to
  60. save the name of the guest speaker for last.
  61. use PowerPoint to explain the guest speaker’s accomplishments.
  62. tell the audience that the guest speaker is an excellent orator.
  63. all of the above.
  64. a and c only.
  65. A speaker introducing the president of a university to an audience of prospective students and their families will best accomplish this goal by
  66. praising the president as the finest public speaker on campus.
  67. presenting a detailed biography of the president’s entire life.
  68. discussing the history of the university and its excellent athletic teams.
  69. summarizing the president’s major accomplishments at the university.
  70. defending the changes in graduation requirements instituted by the president.
  71. According to your textbook, the main purpose of a speech of presentation is to present
  72. the main speaker to the audience.
  73. thanks for a gift or an award.
  74. the reasons why a person deserves commendation.
  75. information about the importance of the occasion.
  76. a gift or an award to the recipient.

 

 

  1. When giving a speech of presentation, you should usually
  2. tell why the recipient is receiving her or his award.
  3. present the main speaker briefly and accurately.
  4. avoid mentioning the losers of the award competition.
  5. adapt your presentation to the main speaker.
  6. give a brief biography of the main speaker.
  7. Which of the following is an example of a speech of presentation?
  8. a speech presenting a new reporter to the newspaper staff
  9. a speech presenting reasons why a new high school needs to be built
  10. a speech presenting a famous professor who will lecture on economics
  11. a speech presenting a certificate of recognition to an outstanding worker
  12. a speech presenting the annual earnings report to stockholders
  13. Which of the following is an example of a speech of presentation?
  14. a speech presenting a main speaker to the audience
  15. a speech presenting a eulogy at a funeral
  16. a speech presenting a toast to the bride and groom
  17. a speech presenting a new manager to her employees
  18. a speech presenting an award to an outstanding student
  19. At a comedy awards show, Adam Sandler gave a splendid speech explaining why David Letterman was receiving a special award for his achievements in television comedy. According to your textbook, what kind of special occasion speech did Sandler deliver?
  20. an after-dinner speech
  21. a speech of introduction
  22. a speech of presentation
  23. a memorial speech
  24. a celebratory speech
  25. Before presenting the college’s Athlete of the Year award, the athletic director made a point of praising the two athletes who were runners up in this year’s competition. According to your textbook, was this choice appropriate for a speech of presentation?
  26. It is almost always in poor taste to mention the losers.
  27. Identifying the losers makes the winner look even better.
  28. Naming anyone other than the winner usually irritates the audience.
  29. It is often appropriate to praise the losers of a competition.
  30. Mentioning the losers diminishes the value of an award.
  31. When Carlos Bustamante received the Alumni of the Year award at his alma mater’s annual award dinner, he gave a speech thanking the school for recognizing his work. What kind of speech did Carlos give?
  32. an acceptance speech
  33. a speech of introduction
  34. a commemorative speech
  35. a speech of presentation
  36. an informative speech
  37. When Gabriel received the Top Engineering Student award at the department’s annual award ceremony, he gave a speech thanking the department for according him this honor. According to your textbook, what kind of special-occasion speech did Gabriel give?
  38. an inspirational speech
  39. a speech of introduction
  40. a commemorative speech
  41. an acceptance speech
  42. a speech of presentation
  43. According to your textbook, a speech in which an individual gives thanks for a gift or award is termed a(n)
  44. speech of presentation.
  45. commemorative speech.
  46. after-dinner speech.
  47. acceptance speech.
  48. speech of introduction.
  49. According to your textbook, in a speech of acceptance a speaker should usually
  50. thank the people who are bestowing the award.
  51. praise himself or herself for having the talent to win the award.
  52. express appreciation for the people who helped him or her gain the award.
  53. all of the above.
  54. a and c only.
  55. According to your textbook, the major traits of a good acceptance speech are brevity, humility, and
  56. According to your textbook, a speech that pays tribute to a person, a group, an institution, or an idea is called a
  57. dedication speech.
  58. commemorative speech.
  59. remembrance speech.
  60. celebratory speech.
  61. memorial speech.
  62. According to your textbook, when your fundamental purpose in a speech is to inspire the audience, you are most likely presenting a(n) __________ speech.
  63. informative
  64. persuasive
  65. after-dinner
  66. commemorative
  67. acceptance
  68. According to your textbook, the fundamental purpose of a commemorative speech is to
  69. As explained in your textbook, when delivering a commemorative speech, you should take special care to
  70. provide a detailed biography of the person being commemorated.
  71. heighten appreciation for the person being commemorated.
  72. use creative language to express feelings and sentiments.
  73. all of the above.
  74. b and c only.
  75. According to your textbook, a commemorative speech
  76. uses visual aids to create persuasive images.
  77. pays tribute to a person, a group, an institution, or an idea.
  78. is essentially the same as an informative speech.
  79. all of the above.
  80. b and c only.
  81. As your textbook explains, perhaps no speech depends more on the creative and subtle use of language than does the
  82. commemorative speech.
  83. speech of presentation.
  84. persuasive speech.
  85. speech of introduction.
  86. informative speech.
  87. As your textbook explains, a successful commemorative speech usually depends on the speaker’s ability to
  88. motivate a passive audience to take action.
  89. put into language the thoughts and emotions appropriate to the occasion.
  90. explain why the recipient is receiving an award.
  91. all of the above.
  92. a and b only.
  93. As your textbook explains, we continue to find commemorative speeches like the Gettysburg Address meaningful and inspiring primarily because
  94. they were given by important historical figures.
  95. of their eloquent use of language.
  96. they were delivered from memory.
  97. of the occasions on which they were delivered.
  98. they motivated people to take heroic action.
  99. As your textbook explains, when giving a commemorative speech, a speaker should take care to
  100. avoid falling back on clichés and trite sentiments.
  101. thank the people who made the award possible.
  102. use PowerPoint to generate strong emotions..
  103. all of the above.
  104. a and c only.
  105. At the dedication of the national World War II memorial, Tom Hanks gave a speech praising Americans who fought and sacrificed during the war. According to your textbook, Hanks gave a(n)
  106. persuasive speech.
  107. invitational speech.
  108. speech of presentation.
  109. commemorative speech.
  110. informative speech.
  111. Which of the following speeches that you might hear on a college campus would be an example of a commemorative speech?
  112. an activist’s call to boycott local grocers
  113. a governor’s remarks at the graduation ceremony
  114. a campus speaker’s talk on ending sexual violence
  115. a guest lecturer’s presentation of her research
  116. a professor’s lecture on the causes of the Civil War
  117. If you attended the Academy Awards and heard the following speeches, which one would be an example of a commemorative speech?
  118. a speech accepting the best actor award.
  119. a speech explaining the history of the Oscar statue.
  120. a speech honoring Audrey Hepburn for her lifetime achievements.
  121. a speech explaining the balloting system and new security measures.
  122. a speech calling for an end to land mines throughout the world.
  123. Which of the following is an example of a commemorative speech?
  124. a political candidate’s campaign speech
  125. a soccer coach’s pre-game pep talk
  126. a speaker’s acceptance of an award
  127. a teacher’s lecture on banking ethics
  128. a daughter’s eulogy in honor of her father
  129. Which of the following is an example of a commemorative speech?
  130. a speech to a local history club recounting the major events in the life of the famous architect Frank Lloyd Wright
  131. a speech urging the city council to use architectural plans by Frank Lloyd Wright as the basis for a new convention center
  132. a speech explaining the major elements of Frank Lloyd Wright’s architectural genius to a class of art history students
  133. a speech praising the architectural accomplishments of Frank Lloyd Wright at the opening of a museum devoted to his work
  134. a speech telling the audience where they can visit buildings designed by Frank Lloyd Wright
  135. Which of the following is an example of a commemorative speech?
  136. a speech seeking to convince the school board to keep the schools open for extracurricular activities on Martin Luther King Day
  137. a speech to the student government aimed at getting funding for special campus activities on Martin Luther King Day
  138. a lecture to a community audience explaining the oratorical techniques used in Martin Luther King’s “I Have a Dream”
  139. a speech analyzing the philosophy of nonviolent protest employed by Martin Luther King during the civil rights movement
  140. a speech honoring Martin Luther King’s life and legacy at the opening event for the campus-wide Martin Luther King Day observances

 

Short-Answer Questions

  1. A speech presenting the main speaker to the audience is called a speech of _______________ .

introduction

 

  1. Name four guidelines presented in your textbook for a speech of introduction:

 

Possible answers include:

Be brief.

Make sure your remarks are completely accurate.

Adapt your remarks to the occasion.

Adapt your remarks to the speaker.

Adapt your remarks to the audience.

Try to create a sense of anticipation and drama.

 

  1. A speech announcing the winner of an award and giving the award to the recipient is called a speech of _______________ .

presentation

 

  1. A speech that gives thanks for a gift or an award is called a(n) _______________ speech.

acceptance

 

  1. A speech paying tribute to a person, idea, or institution is called a(n) _______________ speech.

commemorative

 

  1. A Memorial Day speech honoring U.S. soldiers who have died in defense of their country is an example of a(n) _______________ speech.

commemorative

 

  1. Bill Clinton’s speech dedicating the Monument to the Struggle against World Terrorism at the site of the 9/11 attack in New York City is an example of a(n) _______________ speech.

commemorative

Essay Questions

  1. Define and give an example of each of the following:
  2. speech of introduction
  3. speech of presentation
  4. acceptance speech
  5. commemorative speech

 

  1. Your textbook provides six guidelines for effective speeches of introduction. In a well-developed essay, identify and explain four of these guidelines.

 

  1. What does it mean to say that a speech of introduction should be adapted to the main speaker?

 

  1. How might a speaker try to create a sense of anticipation and drama in a speech of introduction?

 

  1. What is the difference between a speech of presentation and an acceptance speech?

 

  1. How is a commemorative speech similar to and different from an informative speech?

 

  1. Explain the following statement: “In some ways a commemorative speech is like an Impressionist painting—a picture with warm colors and texture capturing a mood or a moment.”

 

Reviews

There are no reviews yet.

Be the first to review “The Art of Public Speaking, 11th Edition by Stephen Lucas – Test Bank”

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *